Advertisement

Intersections: Feeling flush over a taboo topic

April 02, 2014|By Liana Aghajanian

I am sitting on a gray, velvet, diamond-tufted couch in a top-floor apartment that overlooks Los Angeles. The view is breathtaking. There are hookah pipes strewn around on tables outside and a Mariah Carey song is the background music of the day.

But I’m not here to talk about organizing parties or how “Always Be My Baby” is Carey’s best song ever (you can argue this point with me later.)

I’m here to talk about something a little less appropriate when it comes to polite conversation, something taboo, something there’s no good word for when you’re trying to explain what it is you’re actually talking about.

I’m here to talk about going to the bathroom, or perhaps, bathroom posture, I should say. Burbank resident Bud Lavassani, creator of the “Step and Go” is telling me how I’ve been doing it all wrong.

There’s a better way to eliminate, he says. That’s why he’s created the “Step and Go,” a plastic attachment that fits snugly around the base of your toilet, elevating your feet and leading to more, ahem, “comfortable elimination.”

Advertisement

This position, the modern-day reincarnation of squatting — which is what humans have done for millennia — helps in alleviating your bowels completely.

This, says Lavassani, is “a natural option and a healthy option to get rid of their existing problems such as hemorrhoids and constipation and other lower-digestive-tract issues.”

I’d be skeptical, but at the risk of providing you with too much information, I’ve been trying out Lavassani’s product for the past few weeks

The difference is noticeable.

In fact, doctors and medical experts advocate it. Squatting, they say, is the best posture for defecation, a practice that went away with the invention of the flushing toilet in the 16th century. It can help alleviate a slew of issues such as inflammatory bowel disease and appendicitis.

While the concept seems quite foreign and even a bit uncouth to Western audiences, the practice is still very common and widespread in places like Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

Lavassani, along with his brother Fred and business partner Michael Halioua, are on a mission to revolutionize how Americans are going to the bathroom with the “Step and Go.”

Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|
|
|