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Sports | By Robert Fulton | June 23, 2013
LOS ANGELES - The Crescenta Valley High boys' basketball team ran into a freight train in the form of El Camino Real in the semifinals of the War on the Floor Tournament at Los Angeles Pierce College on Sunday. “I'm frustrated by the loss,” Crescenta Valley's Kevin Dinges said. “I take every game seriously no matter what. This team came ready to play and we were a little bit lagging in the beginning. They came through and blew us out.” El Camino Real, last year's L.A. City Section runner-up, defeated the Falcons, 67-38.
NEWS
By Jason Wells, jason.wells@latimes.com | March 27, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) on Tuesday introduced legislation that would set a deadline for establishing a new federal cap on chromium 6 contamination in drinking water. The move comes two weeks after the congressman called on the Environmental Protection Agency to release a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans. Those findings - which would be key for setting new maximum contamination levels - were postponed so the agency could also finish studying the effects of inhaling hexavalent chromium, and then release both reports at the same time.
NEWS
By Lisa Dupuy | April 14, 2014
A parking lot lined with red tassels marks the opening of the 18th Gelson's Market location in La Cañada Flintridge. Food chat sites like Chowhound suggest that the shopping experience at Gelson's is somewhere between that at Whole Foods and Ralphs. In an effort to get to know the store better, I took it upon myself to test that theory with a very unscientific experiment. Below are the results. By most accounts, Gelson's is renowned for their high-quality meats, seafood and produce.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | June 21, 2007
As the graduating class of Glendale High School walked off Moyse Field, a group of about 10 students spontaneously ran a lap around the track. It was a reminder of the school's spirit that graduation speakers said will lead them to success in life. "We have a free spirit, rebelliousness," said 18-year-old Ani Antanesyan, who was panting from her short run. "We just did it. It's over. Yeah!" A crowd of adoring parents and friends packed the bleachers looking over about 650 students garbed in their school colors — the boys in black gowns and the girls in red gowns.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com and By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 28, 2013
With pulsating jazz music blaring, Glendale resident Paul Karmiryan popped on stage Tuesday night doing flip after flip toward the audience during one of his final performances on "So You Think You Can Dance. " For the past several weeks, the judges on the hit Fox show have gushed over Karmiryan, but that didn't save him from being booted off the show as he fell behind the top four finalists in garnering audience votes. VIDEO: Paul and Kathryn perform in "So You Think You Can Dance" "It's so unpredictable," Karmiryan said during a conference call with reporters Wednesday afternoon, adding that although he didn't make it to the finale, he wouldn't have changed a thing.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | September 25, 2011
Unexpected medical issues have forced two longtime Glendale police dogs to retire early and another one to work part time, leaving just one full-strength dog to carry the unit. Police dogs Marlin and Sam retired this summer after roughly six years sniffing out bombs, narcotics and suspects. Marlin lost his sense of smell, and Sam, after years of strenuous physical demands, developed arthritis and a pinched nerve that causes his legs to fall asleep without steroids. The third dog, Quwai, is working part time in narcotics searches because he also has been struggling with medical issues, including having difficulty climbing and bouncing in and out of cars.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 14, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) increased pressure on the Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday to issue a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans, calling the slow progress “unconscionable.” In his letter to U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, the congressman whose district has a long-running problem with chromium 6 contamination of underground water said the agency “must stop wasting time...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 23, 2013
While welcoming a draft of a proposed and long-awaited limit on the drinking water contaminant chromium 6, local politicians said they fear the state standard doesn't go far enough. The California Department of Public Health on Thursday set a draft limit of chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly higher than a goal set by state officials in 2011. At the time, officials set a goal of 0.02 parts per billion for the cancer-causing ion, but the Department of Public Health decided on a much higher maximum level, stating that the lower target would not be economically feasible for water agencies.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | November 21, 2013
The story behind Kenneth Village, the cluster of shops on Kenneth Road between Sonora and Grandview avenues in northwest Glendale, goes back to a time before those streets even existed. It was a time when it was open country, west of the little village of Casa Verdugo, and totally separate from another settlement to the southeast called Glendale. Vineyards, citrus orchards and commercial gardens covered most of the land. The most dominant man-made feature was a small cemetery, called Grand View, which opened in the mid-1880s, and it was one of the few such places around.
THE818NOW
By Ross A. Benson and Maria Hsin | August 31, 2011
A man who was allegedly approached by an officer Tuesday night at the Fry's Electronics parking lot in Burbank led police on a chase before crashing into the entrance of Valhalla Cemetery. Edvard Takhmazyan, 31, of Sunland was arrested Tuesday night for allegedly possessing heroine and driving under the influence, Burbank Police Officer Joshua Kendrick said. _________________________ FOR THE RECORD: This amends an earlier version that incorrectly stated that there was an altercation with store security guards.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | October 20, 2010
Where I work, one of the most common questions editors ask each other is whether some term — say soymilk or healthcare — should be written as one word or two. And the responses we get and give might surprise you. Though occasionally one of us will answer, "I just looked that up today! Soymilk is one word," more often, someone will yell out, "Let me check. " Knowing whether a term is one word, two words, or hyphenated would be the hardest part of an editor's job were it not for one thing: We're not supposed to know.
NEWS
By June Casagrande | March 22, 2013
There's got to be something in the air. In recent weeks, I've gotten not one but two e-mails from readers about the word “got” and its cousin “gotten.” “I will never forget several teachers telling me that using 'got' in any sentence anytime was simply being lazy,” wrote John in Pasadena, “that it was bad English, uncouth, uneducated, etc.” We could probably write this off as a fluke, perhaps guessing that John went to a...
NEWS
April 25, 2014
Dunkin' Donuts is bringing its famous doughnuts, breakfast sandwiches and coffee to Burbank and Glendale over the next several years. Dunkin' Donuts signed a multi-unit store development agreement with two new franchise groups. One will develop 10 locations in the San Fernando Valley and the other will develop 10 locations in South Orange County, the Los Angeles Times reported .  The Massachusetts-based company has also signed agreements to develop more than 150 new locations all over California, the first expected to open by the end of the year, according to a spokesperson for the company.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | June 20, 2009
Hoover High School Principal Kevin Welsh knew the class of 2009 was unique when he saw the students dancing at their prom. “It’s the anti-freaking class,” he told an audience at the school’s football field for the seniors’ graduation ceremony Friday, explaining that the students had “danced appropriately” during their final high school dance. “I’ve never had a class like that,” he said, drawing laughs from the audience.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | February 1, 2013
Glendale played a starring role in the 1945 movie "Mildred Pierce," the story of a single mother who opens a restaurant right here in the heart of Glendale. The movie was based on a book by the same name written by James M. Cain in 1941. “Cain portrayed Glendale as the epitome of the working-class aspirations and disappointments in Depression-era California,” said Arlene Vidor, past president of the Glendale Historical Society, who wrote an article on the movie for the society's Summer 2010 newsletter.
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