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NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | January 29, 2008
Glendale High School teachers Sarah Morrison and Katie Williams knew from experience that once serious math students reach college, group study sessions become an integral part of grasping the advanced material. So the two math teachers started after-school study sessions this fall for their students in Advanced Placement calculus, a course in which students can earn college credit if they score high enough on the exam they’ll take in the spring. Attending the after-school sessions is optional, but each day two to three dozen students show up and work for hours on calculus classwork, homework or challenge questions that push them beyond the material they’ve already covered.
NEWS
November 4, 2003
As a parent of a high school student, I take exception to Richard M. Holbrook's attitudes toward my child's educational experience. If Holbrook, of Sylmar, had his way, teachers with an opinion different from his own should be recalled for spreading their "mistaken or ideologically driven" opinions. This obviously conservative writer denounces Nareg Keshishian's editorial regarding California's recall, but he does not even mention that Nick Doom -- another Advanced Placement government teacher -- provided a conservative counterpoint on the same editorial page.
NEWS
December 21, 2002
Heather Hamasaki of Glendale High School has received an Advanced Placement Scholar With Distinction Award. This award is granted to students who have taken at least five Advanced Placement exams and received an average grade of at least 3.5 on all Advanced Placement exams taken. She is the daughter of Clay and Laurie Hamasaki. Lindsey Elise Gary, daughter of Laura Gary of Burbank, has enrolled at Harvard College. She is a graduate of Notre Dame High School.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | February 13, 2010
GLENDALE — Students enrolled in college-level courses in Glendale Unified School District out performed state and national pass rates on AP exams, officials said. Glendale Unified students passed more than 2,550 Advanced Placement exams, a 58% pass rate out of the roughly 3,690 tests taken last year. National and state Advanced Placement data was released this week by the College Board, a nonprofit organization of colleges and universities that owns and administers the AP curriculum.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
Mr. Kimber's discussion of the Advanced Placement program ("Stuck in the middle with AP courses," Aug. 13) offers two alternatives: limited student access to Advanced Placement courses and high test scores or open student access to these classes and low test scores. Though he gives seemingly logical arguments to defend this dichotomy, he fails to present or accept the idea that other options are possible. This is not a two-sided situation. The possibility exists of having open access to the AP program and having high performance on the tests.
NEWS
June 25, 2003
Josh Kleinbaum Justin Kim didn't think it was unusual to take advanced-placement classes in eighth grade because everyone at his school was doing it. He was a student at Walter Reed Middle School in Los Angeles, a public school with a special accelerated program. His classes included advanced-placement classes in calculus and physics. "In the program, everyone was smart," Kim said. "Only one other person took the same courses as me, but everyone was really smart."
NEWS
December 7, 2002
About 100 Glendale High School students got a taste of the brighter side of medieval life Thursday evening at the school's Medieval Night celebration. English literature and Advanced Placement English literature students dressed in full medieval-era costumes and participated in a costume parade. Students and faculty then ate a hearty meal of chicken and mashed potatoes served by the school's Bistro students. "We're talking drumsticks as big as your forearm," English literature teacher Paul Burghdorf said.
NEWS
April 13, 2004
Nane Gevorgyan, a seventh-grader at Toll Middle School, was recently won the bronze medal in the fifth annual AVID "Write-Off" essay competition. Advancement Via Individual Determination is a college-preparation program geared for students with grade-point averages between 2.5 and 3.0. Students enrolled in the program typically take at least one Advanced Placement college-preparatory course, are exposed to tutorials on time management, college entrance and critical thinking, and take field trips to area colleges.
NEWS
June 14, 2000
Jenna Bordelon LA CRESCENTA -- For Anita Hovanissian, 18, being named the Crescenta Valley High School valedictorian came as no surprise to her, her family or her teachers. "Of course she was, because she's very bright and hard-working," her mother, Nektar Hovanissian, said. "I brag about it." "She has a sparkle about her," Spanish teacher Sue Mohr said. "Anita is the best of American youth," co-principal Gary Talbert said. "She's the best we have to offer."
NEWS
By Jason Wells | May 30, 2007
LA CRESCENTA — For the fourth time in a row, Crescenta Valley High School has placed in the top third of a nationwide survey that ranks schools on the number of college prep tests they administer in proportion to the size of their graduating classes. The high school was the only Glendale Unified campus on Newsweek's High School Challenge Index — a list of 1,288 schools nationwide that had the highest proportion of 12th-graders who took college prep tests during the 2006-07 school year.
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NEWS
By Max Zimbert | February 13, 2010
GLENDALE — Students enrolled in college-level courses in Glendale Unified School District out performed state and national pass rates on AP exams, officials said. Glendale Unified students passed more than 2,550 Advanced Placement exams, a 58% pass rate out of the roughly 3,690 tests taken last year. National and state Advanced Placement data was released this week by the College Board, a nonprofit organization of colleges and universities that owns and administers the AP curriculum.
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NEWS
By Max Zimbert | October 30, 2009
NORTHEAST GLENDALE ? It?s a rite of passage for many ambitious high school students ? the annual college fair. More than 100 representatives from colleges, universities and career institutes fielded questions while pitching their campuses to hundreds of high school students and their parents Wednesday at the Civic Auditorium. Students of every grade level attended the college fair. Some had begun the application process, others were looking at community colleges, and many agreed: There were too many forms to fill out. ?
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | January 29, 2008
Glendale High School teachers Sarah Morrison and Katie Williams knew from experience that once serious math students reach college, group study sessions become an integral part of grasping the advanced material. So the two math teachers started after-school study sessions this fall for their students in Advanced Placement calculus, a course in which students can earn college credit if they score high enough on the exam they’ll take in the spring. Attending the after-school sessions is optional, but each day two to three dozen students show up and work for hours on calculus classwork, homework or challenge questions that push them beyond the material they’ve already covered.
FEATURES
By Helen Kantor | November 16, 2007
Part one of two ? Advanced placement classes in high school continue to grow significantly in number and enrollment at Crescenta Valley and La CaƱada high schools as both schools have seen a steady and often dramatic increase over the last five years. During the fall season when seniors apply for college, these classes take on considerable importance. An AP course is a college level course taught on a high school campus and approved by College Board, a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | May 30, 2007
LA CRESCENTA — For the fourth time in a row, Crescenta Valley High School has placed in the top third of a nationwide survey that ranks schools on the number of college prep tests they administer in proportion to the size of their graduating classes. The high school was the only Glendale Unified campus on Newsweek's High School Challenge Index — a list of 1,288 schools nationwide that had the highest proportion of 12th-graders who took college prep tests during the 2006-07 school year.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
Mr. Kimber's discussion of the Advanced Placement program ("Stuck in the middle with AP courses," Aug. 13) offers two alternatives: limited student access to Advanced Placement courses and high test scores or open student access to these classes and low test scores. Though he gives seemingly logical arguments to defend this dichotomy, he fails to present or accept the idea that other options are possible. This is not a two-sided situation. The possibility exists of having open access to the AP program and having high performance on the tests.
NEWS
April 13, 2004
Nane Gevorgyan, a seventh-grader at Toll Middle School, was recently won the bronze medal in the fifth annual AVID "Write-Off" essay competition. Advancement Via Individual Determination is a college-preparation program geared for students with grade-point averages between 2.5 and 3.0. Students enrolled in the program typically take at least one Advanced Placement college-preparatory course, are exposed to tutorials on time management, college entrance and critical thinking, and take field trips to area colleges.
NEWS
March 25, 2004
Gary Moskowitz Matt Berryman is not worried about the overachieving or low-performing students in his classroom. He is mostly concerned about the students right in the middle. Berryman teaches computer graphics to juniors and seniors in the Antelope Valley Union High School District. He and about 50 other educators from throughout Los Angeles County visited Hoover High School on Wednesday to learn more about Hoover's Advancement Via Individual Determination, or AVID, program.
NEWS
November 4, 2003
As a parent of a high school student, I take exception to Richard M. Holbrook's attitudes toward my child's educational experience. If Holbrook, of Sylmar, had his way, teachers with an opinion different from his own should be recalled for spreading their "mistaken or ideologically driven" opinions. This obviously conservative writer denounces Nareg Keshishian's editorial regarding California's recall, but he does not even mention that Nick Doom -- another Advanced Placement government teacher -- provided a conservative counterpoint on the same editorial page.
NEWS
August 16, 2003
National Charity League, Glendale Chapter recently recognized 21 graduating Ticktockers at the Senior Presentation at the Regent Beverly Wilshire. The group is a mother/daughter organization that promotes volunteerism and community service. Over the last six years, the Class of 2003 contributed 7,703 hours of service to such philanthropies as the Salvation Army, YWCA of Glendale, American Red Cross and others. Today we feature four of the Ticktockers.
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