Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsAlgebra
IN THE NEWS

Algebra

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 26, 2012
Historical revisionism and political correctness continue to gain space in the “Mailbag” section. Latest is the claim by Richard Bennett (Oct. 20) criticizing the Rev. Bryan Griem about yoga. Bennett claims “algebra … was invented by a Muslim.” This is utter nonsense. A Muslim? Who? Well, several pro-Islamist websites claim he was Abu Ja'far Muhammad ibn Musa, described by them as the father of algebra. But there's a slight problem: Abu Ja'far was a newcomer. He lived from 780 to 850 AD. The origins of algebra precede his birth by 2,500 years - in ancient Babylonia, Egypt and Athens.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | July 14, 2008
GLENDALE — Some local and state educators are dismayed over the state board of education’s recent decision that, three years from now, will effectively require California students to take Algebra I in eighth grade. The state board, which sets policy for kindergarten through 12th-grade education in areas such as standards and assessment, approved the change with an 8-1 vote during its meeting on Wednesday. The move was supported by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who endorsed the change the day before the meeting.
NEWS
By: Darleene Barrientos | September 20, 2005
Glendale High School senior Jess Parmele is not a fan of algebra. After failing the regular, yearlong class twice, he enrolled in the summer program, an intensive four-hour class -- and passed. The big difference was "the fact that it was four hours long and there was tutors to help and it was a lot more intense," 17-year-old Jess said, adding that he is now enrolled in geometry. "With the main year, it's like that whole period of time was way too long."
NEWS
May 22, 2002
Gary Moskowitz GLENDALE -- Reports released by the school district last week show almost 20% of Glendale's sophomores are falling behind in mathematics. The same reports show 13% of the class of 2004 have failed the first semester of algebra and an additional 5% have failed the first semester of geometry. Eighteen percent of the district's 2,569 sophomores -- 345 students -- are now enrolled in a math class below the algebra level. Special education students could account for 5% to 8% of that figure.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | August 7, 2007
About 40 Roosevelt Middle School students gave up a part of their summer vacation to get ahead in math. Students took introduction to algebra so they could be eligible for Algebra 1 this fall. Tatevik Sarkisian walked up to the white board last week and solved an algebra problem that dealt with parallel and perpendicular slopes. Solving for the slope came easy for the 12-year-old, as her peers tried to keep up with her in their notebooks. "It's kind of getting harder, but when you get it, it's easy," she said of Algebra.
NEWS
June 7, 2001
Alecia Foster NORTHWEST GLENDALE -- Students in the Glendale Unified School District fared well in the annual Los Angeles County Math Field Day. Students from 13 Glendale elementary and middle schools participated with schools from 24 other districts in Saturday's competition. Teams were grouped according to grade level. The fourth-grade team took first place in algebra, fourth place in number sense and third place in statistics. The fifth-grade team took first place in geometry, fourth-place in number sense and sixth place in algebra.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 25, 2008
On July 9, the state Board of Education voted to implement a proposal to require all eighth grade students in California public schools to be assessed in algebra 1. The proposal was initially made by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. In a letter to Theodore Mitchell, the president of the state Board of Education, the governor promoted the requirement by stating, ?the state board must choose whether we align the eighth grade mathematics test with our high expectations or perpetuate a two-track system: one for high achievers and one for those of whom we expect less.
NEWS
June 4, 2002
Assemblyman Dario Frommer needs to get his priorities in order. "The really big need in our state right now is communities like ours that don't have any more open space and growing populations of children that have nowhere to play," Frommer states. "It's the parents' responsibility to provide a place for their children to play." California is $24 billion short, Glendale $8 million short, we are at war fighting for our lives, 20% of Glendale sophomores are falling behind in mathematics, 13% of the Class of 2004 has failed the first semester of algebra, and an additional 5% have failed the first semester of geometry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 26, 2012
Historical revisionism and political correctness continue to gain space in the “Mailbag” section. Latest is the claim by Richard Bennett (Oct. 20) criticizing the Rev. Bryan Griem about yoga. Bennett claims “algebra … was invented by a Muslim.” This is utter nonsense. A Muslim? Who? Well, several pro-Islamist websites claim he was Abu Ja'far Muhammad ibn Musa, described by them as the father of algebra. But there's a slight problem: Abu Ja'far was a newcomer. He lived from 780 to 850 AD. The origins of algebra precede his birth by 2,500 years - in ancient Babylonia, Egypt and Athens.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | March 5, 2010
GLENDALE — Students will have to pay $375 if they choose to take two semesters’ worth of classes during summer school, according to a cost-saving plan school board members unanimously approved Tuesday. The Glendale Unified School District plan comes without any guarantee of financial aid or scholarships for students who want to advance through a subject or who want to fulfill a graduation requirement. Students who want to take one semester’s worth of course work, such as health, would pay $190.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Arvizu | January 17, 2010
Just the very mention of math makes some people run for the hills. But for “Math Doctor” Ron Hartwell, it’s just another day in the classroom. Hartwell, owner of Glendale-based Math Doctor, tutors students from across the region — including Glendale, La Crescenta, La Cañada and Burbank — and specializes in making mathematics less intimidating. “Each student’s different,” Hartwell said as he sat in a booth at a Starbucks in Glendale, which sometimes doubles as one of his classrooms.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | February 3, 2009
Kindergarten teacher Robyn Wisinski has been secretly teaching her students algebra. Using a color-coordinated number chart and a pointer, she led her 5- and 6-year-old students Wednesday as they counted by tens up to 80, then by ones up to 87 to represent the number of days the students have been at Edison Elementary School this year. Then came the excitement. “We’re almost at 100!” one student called out, prompting Wisinski to ask the class how many days were left until day 100. No one had an answer, but the students were learning algebraic principles, even simple ones, just by looking at the chart, she said.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 25, 2008
On July 9, the state Board of Education voted to implement a proposal to require all eighth grade students in California public schools to be assessed in algebra 1. The proposal was initially made by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. In a letter to Theodore Mitchell, the president of the state Board of Education, the governor promoted the requirement by stating, ?the state board must choose whether we align the eighth grade mathematics test with our high expectations or perpetuate a two-track system: one for high achievers and one for those of whom we expect less.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | July 14, 2008
GLENDALE — Some local and state educators are dismayed over the state board of education’s recent decision that, three years from now, will effectively require California students to take Algebra I in eighth grade. The state board, which sets policy for kindergarten through 12th-grade education in areas such as standards and assessment, approved the change with an 8-1 vote during its meeting on Wednesday. The move was supported by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who endorsed the change the day before the meeting.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | August 7, 2007
About 40 Roosevelt Middle School students gave up a part of their summer vacation to get ahead in math. Students took introduction to algebra so they could be eligible for Algebra 1 this fall. Tatevik Sarkisian walked up to the white board last week and solved an algebra problem that dealt with parallel and perpendicular slopes. Solving for the slope came easy for the 12-year-old, as her peers tried to keep up with her in their notebooks. "It's kind of getting harder, but when you get it, it's easy," she said of Algebra.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|