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NEWS
October 29, 2004
Mountain Avenue Elementary School has more than 600 residents newly trained to respond to a medical emergency. They're a little on the young side, but they're eager. The residents, all students at Mountain Avenue Elementary, graduated from the American Medical Response Junior Paramedic Program, a weeklong class that culminated in a rally and swearing-in ceremony Thursday at the school. Paramedics from American Medical Response taught students the basics of responding to a medical crisis, including recognizing breathing and bleeding emergencies and what to do when calling 911. The lessons were driven home during a simulated emergency at a rally for the students.
NEWS
January 24, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- Glendale is gearing up to take over ambulance service in the city from a private company. The Glendale Fire Department has targeted March 1 for taking over the responsibility from American Medical Response and will have four ambulances staffed with two paramedics each at fire stations. Two two-team paramedics had been assigned at fire stations since August, but American Medical Response has continued to provide its paramedic and ambulance service.
NEWS
January 8, 2005
Jackson Bell They might not be tall enough to see over the steering wheel of an ambulance, but a gymnasium full of excited Monte Vista Elementary School students were sworn in as the most recent batch of junior paramedics. The students graduated from the American Medical Response Junior Paramedic Program, a weeklong class that ended Friday with a rally and swearing-in ceremony conducted at the school by Crescenta Valley Town Councilman Brian Ostler.
NEWS
February 1, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- A Sacramento company has been hired to handle the billing for Glendale's paramedic and ambulance service. Wittman Enterprises will be paid a fee of 6.3% on collections over two years. Based on expected collections of $3.37 million, the agreement will cost the city about $212,000. Glendale officials had expected a fee of 7.5% for those services. A private company is needed because of the complexity of billing Medicare, MediCal and insurance plans, said Fire Chief Richard Hinz.
NEWS
February 25, 2004
Robert Chacon La Canada Flintridge has 750 more residents trained to respond in a medical emergency. The residents, all students at La Canada Elementary School, graduated from the American Medical Response Junior Paramedic Program, a weeklong class that culminated in a rally and swearing-in ceremony Tuesday at the school. Paramedics from American Medical Response -- one of the country's largest medical transportation companies -- taught students the basics of responding to a medical crisis, including recognizing breathing and bleeding emergencies and what to do when calling 911 for help.
NEWS
By: | October 8, 2005
AMANDA CHASE AND TRAVIS KUEHN Amanda Joanne Chase will marry Travis Joseph Kuehn in March. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Jim and Diana Chase and Gina and Tom Martin of La Crescenta, and a graduate of Crescenta Valley High School. She will receive her bachelor's degree in nursing from Azusa Pacific University in December. The bridegroom-elect is the son of Jim Kuehn and Joni and Ernie Myatt of Santa Clarita, and is a graduate of Hart High School.
NEWS
February 9, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- The estate of a Glendale woman has filed a $5-million claim against the city, claiming wrongful death when she was treated by paramedics. The claim cited negligence and wrongful conduct by paramedics Aug. 4 when Yeghsabet Petrossian was transported to Glendale Adventist Medical Center and died. City Atty. Scott Howard said it is the city's policy not to comment on claims. Glendale's new paramedic program did not start until Aug. 16, said Glendale Assistant Fire Chief Chris Gray.
NEWS
March 1, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman GLENDALE -- It's late on a weekday night, and the two paramedics at Fire Station 25 turn on the siren to head to yet another call. They've been going nonstop for hours. Jamil Lozano pulls the ambulance to a stop in front of a fire engine that barely beat them there. He and fellow Firefighter/Paramedic Gregg Shaw jump out of the ambulance, pausing only to collect a medical kit and a defibrillator before heading into the apartment.
NEWS
December 10, 2003
Darleene Barrientos When faced with gridlock, drivers fantasize about having all stoplights go green on command, but state and city officials are intent on restricting that privilege to police, fire and medical emergency personnel. Legislation sponsored by Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Glendale) will be introduced to ban the public sale of mobile infrared transmitters, devices that can cause a stoplight to change from red to green if the light is equipped with that technology.
NEWS
October 20, 2001
Amber Willard SOUTHWEST GLENDALE -- An impasse in contract negotiations led to cries of protest among a group of picketing emergency services workers Friday. About 30 paramedics and emergency medical technicians carried protest signs in front of the American Medical Response dispatch office on Broadway. "They start EMTs at $8.46 an hour. That's why we're here," said Carlos Osorio, who has worked for the company as an EMT for 12 years and is a chief shop steward for their union.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By: | October 8, 2005
AMANDA CHASE AND TRAVIS KUEHN Amanda Joanne Chase will marry Travis Joseph Kuehn in March. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Jim and Diana Chase and Gina and Tom Martin of La Crescenta, and a graduate of Crescenta Valley High School. She will receive her bachelor's degree in nursing from Azusa Pacific University in December. The bridegroom-elect is the son of Jim Kuehn and Joni and Ernie Myatt of Santa Clarita, and is a graduate of Hart High School.
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NEWS
January 8, 2005
Jackson Bell They might not be tall enough to see over the steering wheel of an ambulance, but a gymnasium full of excited Monte Vista Elementary School students were sworn in as the most recent batch of junior paramedics. The students graduated from the American Medical Response Junior Paramedic Program, a weeklong class that ended Friday with a rally and swearing-in ceremony conducted at the school by Crescenta Valley Town Councilman Brian Ostler.
NEWS
October 29, 2004
Mountain Avenue Elementary School has more than 600 residents newly trained to respond to a medical emergency. They're a little on the young side, but they're eager. The residents, all students at Mountain Avenue Elementary, graduated from the American Medical Response Junior Paramedic Program, a weeklong class that culminated in a rally and swearing-in ceremony Thursday at the school. Paramedics from American Medical Response taught students the basics of responding to a medical crisis, including recognizing breathing and bleeding emergencies and what to do when calling 911. The lessons were driven home during a simulated emergency at a rally for the students.
LOCAL
By Mary O'Keefe | October 28, 2004
With the help of paramedics and emergency medical technicians, Mountain Avenue Elementary students this week learned what happens after you call 911. The medical teams came from American Medical Response, the team that responds to 911 calls in Los Angeles County, according to Leagh Clausen, who coordinates a program that brings emergency personnel to schools to teach elementary children what an emergency is and what happens from the time they...
NEWS
April 27, 2004
Robert Chacon A wildfire will break out Wednesday in the hills above La Canada Flintridge, wounding 50 people, some fatally. That is not the future as told by a soothsayer. Later this week is the city's annual disaster drill, in which local emergency agencies will practice coordinating services in case of a major disaster. The exercise this year will center on the wildfire. The Los Angeles County Fire and Sheriff's departments, water agencies, Pasadena Humane Society, American Medical Response ambulances, La Canada Flintridge Chamber of Commerce, city staff and American Red Cross will participate in the two-day event.
NEWS
February 25, 2004
Robert Chacon La Canada Flintridge has 750 more residents trained to respond in a medical emergency. The residents, all students at La Canada Elementary School, graduated from the American Medical Response Junior Paramedic Program, a weeklong class that culminated in a rally and swearing-in ceremony Tuesday at the school. Paramedics from American Medical Response -- one of the country's largest medical transportation companies -- taught students the basics of responding to a medical crisis, including recognizing breathing and bleeding emergencies and what to do when calling 911 for help.
NEWS
December 10, 2003
Darleene Barrientos When faced with gridlock, drivers fantasize about having all stoplights go green on command, but state and city officials are intent on restricting that privilege to police, fire and medical emergency personnel. Legislation sponsored by Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Glendale) will be introduced to ban the public sale of mobile infrared transmitters, devices that can cause a stoplight to change from red to green if the light is equipped with that technology.
NEWS
March 29, 2003
LA CANADA FLINTRIDGE -- If you're going to trip, fall down and knock yourself unconscious, Palm Crest Elementary School is the place to do it. About 700 students at the school were deemed junior paramedics Friday, after a week of receiving training in safety from representatives of American Medical Response. But before they could take the oath of a junior paramedic, the students had one last test to take. They had to review the basic fundamentals of safety they had spent a week learning.
NEWS
March 1, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman GLENDALE -- It's late on a weekday night, and the two paramedics at Fire Station 25 turn on the siren to head to yet another call. They've been going nonstop for hours. Jamil Lozano pulls the ambulance to a stop in front of a fire engine that barely beat them there. He and fellow Firefighter/Paramedic Gregg Shaw jump out of the ambulance, pausing only to collect a medical kit and a defibrillator before heading into the apartment.
NEWS
October 20, 2001
Amber Willard SOUTHWEST GLENDALE -- An impasse in contract negotiations led to cries of protest among a group of picketing emergency services workers Friday. About 30 paramedics and emergency medical technicians carried protest signs in front of the American Medical Response dispatch office on Broadway. "They start EMTs at $8.46 an hour. That's why we're here," said Carlos Osorio, who has worked for the company as an EMT for 12 years and is a chief shop steward for their union.
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