Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsArmenian Diaspora
IN THE NEWS

Armenian Diaspora

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 21, 2012
Fewer Armenian Americans are speaking the language of their native country, eroding the ability of the diaspora to preserve its culture, according to an expert at UCLA who addressed a conference organized at the Central Library on Saturday. Since 1970, the use of the Armenian language has decreased dramatically in all areas of diasporan life, including weddings, baptisms, schools and newspapers, said Hagop Gulludjian, a lecturer of Armenian studies at UCLA. Language is key to the survival of ethnic identity, particularly because the Armenian diaspora appears to be permanent, he added.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
His Holiness Aram I, Catholicos of the Great House of Cilicia and spiritual leader of Armenian Diaspora, visited Glendale Memorial Hospital Friday as part of a larger tour of Southern California. Having proclaimed 2011 “The Year of the Armenian Child,” the pontiff bestowed blessings to some of the hospital's patients, newborns and other visitors, organizers said. The pontiff's itinerary for his 20-day tour includes a lecture at UCLA and visits to local churches, school and other organizations.
NEWS
November 13, 2000
Paul Clinton GLENDALE -- When it comes to human rights, France has succeeded where the United States has failed, according to a local Armenian group. The French senate's passage of a resolution recognizing accusations that Ottoman Turkey carried out genocide against Armenians in the first quarter of the 20th Century stands in contrast to the failure of a similar bill in the U.S. Congress last month, a leader of the group said. "France does take the issue of human rights much more seriously than the U.S.," Alex Sardar, executive director of the Western region of the Armenian National Committee, said.
NEWS
April 23, 2011
For the Armenian American community, presidential candidate Barack Obama was full of promise and hope. His position on the Armenian Genocide of 1915, in which 1.5 million Armenian were massacred at the hands of Ottoman Turks, had been well documented. It was genocide, he said. He even called on the federal government to officially recognize it as such. But in the years since winning the presidency, the pull of geo-political complications has so far muted his pledge to officially recognize the genocide.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | March 12, 2007
Hundreds gathered to honor and pay tribute to slain Turkish-Armenian journalist Hrant Dink on Sunday at the Civic Auditorium. Dink, the 52-year-old founder and editor-in-chief of the bilingual Turkish-Armenian newspaper Agos, was assassinated in Istanbul on Jan. 19. He was a proponent of human rights and an advocate of fostering dialogue and reconciliation between Turks and Armenians. “Hrant Dink represented what is happening in modern-day Turkey and his passing is a reflection of that,” said Lena Kaimian, director of the Armenian Assembly of America western office.
NEWS
June 11, 2005
ANI AMIRKHANIAN Recently, I was approached by a stranger at a local coffee house in Glendale who saw the employee identification badge I was wearing around my neck. He struggled to pronounce my last name, which proved to be one of the most difficult tasks he has ever completed. "Amer...Amirkan....," he muttered, making every effort to say it out loud. "How do you say that?" he asked, with a puzzled look. I corrected his pronunciation and agreed with him that it was a long name.
FEATURES
By Natalie Yemenidjian | September 17, 2008
Grish Davtian has studied at Tehran University in Iran and the University of London. The poet has since seen a countrywide revolution engulf his daily routine in Iran. After moving to the U.S., he created television programs, books, anthologies and organizations to increase knowledge and discussion of Armenian and English literature. Reporter Natalie Yemenidjian sat down with the 73-year-old Glendale resident and asked him a few questions about his life and experiences. When did you begin to write?
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | June 8, 2011
“The motherland is best loved from afar,” I was told several times en route to Armenia late last month. When I arrived in Yerevan, the country’s capital and its largest city, this cautionary advice lingered in my mind as I rode by blocks of flashy casinos, my taxi zipping through the center of a city that's said to be 29 years older than Rome. My driver, a chubby man who chain-smoked and yelled out to other drivers at various stoplights, begged for more money as I handed him the fare.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | February 8, 2012
In November 2008, a Glendale resident logged onto the Internet forum Topix looking for answers about hostility between Armenian and non-Armenian residents of the city. What, if anything, was the explanation behind the animosity and generalizations that this person had observed? Nearly 3,000 posts, 400 pages and four years later, the thread is still active. In fact, the latest posting was this weekend. Over time, this forum, as is typical of a large amount of discussions on Topix, has turned into a two-way racist cesspool with little intelligent conversation, bruised egos and posts so ridiculous you can't help but laugh.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | June 22, 2013
To understand why Zaven Khanjian wants the Armenian community in Syria - a dwindling population caught in the crossfire of civil war - to endure, you have to go back nearly a century. Long before in-fighting began more than two years ago, Armenians settled in Syria after being driven out of Turkey during the genocide of 1915. Destitute and sick, the Christians were welcomed by the mostly Arabic Syrians and flourished, especially in Aleppo, a city close to the Turkish border and hard hit by war between rebel forces and the sitting government.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian and By Liana Aghajanian | April 17, 2013
On a Saturday morning in a brightly lit classroom at the Burbank Adult School, a group of students are practicing their language skills. Except it's not English they're learning. It's not even Spanish. It's Armenian. Though its Western counterpart has been on an UNESCO endangered language list for a few years, there seems to be a demand for Armenian-language skills in Southern California, a mecca for the Armenian diaspora that has settled more steadily in the area over four decades.
NEWS
May 21, 2012
Fewer Armenian Americans are speaking the language of their native country, eroding the ability of the diaspora to preserve its culture, according to an expert at UCLA who addressed a conference organized at the Central Library on Saturday. Since 1970, the use of the Armenian language has decreased dramatically in all areas of diasporan life, including weddings, baptisms, schools and newspapers, said Hagop Gulludjian, a lecturer of Armenian studies at UCLA. Language is key to the survival of ethnic identity, particularly because the Armenian diaspora appears to be permanent, he added.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | February 8, 2012
In November 2008, a Glendale resident logged onto the Internet forum Topix looking for answers about hostility between Armenian and non-Armenian residents of the city. What, if anything, was the explanation behind the animosity and generalizations that this person had observed? Nearly 3,000 posts, 400 pages and four years later, the thread is still active. In fact, the latest posting was this weekend. Over time, this forum, as is typical of a large amount of discussions on Topix, has turned into a two-way racist cesspool with little intelligent conversation, bruised egos and posts so ridiculous you can't help but laugh.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
His Holiness Aram I, Catholicos of the Great House of Cilicia and spiritual leader of Armenian Diaspora, visited Glendale Memorial Hospital Friday as part of a larger tour of Southern California. Having proclaimed 2011 “The Year of the Armenian Child,” the pontiff bestowed blessings to some of the hospital's patients, newborns and other visitors, organizers said. The pontiff's itinerary for his 20-day tour includes a lecture at UCLA and visits to local churches, school and other organizations.
THE818NOW
September 27, 2011
Armenian organizations are denouncing a planned performance by an Ottoman military marching band in Hollywood. The event planned for Oct. 3 on Hollywood Boulevard between Highland and La Brea avenues has drawn widespread condemnation from Armenian groups, including the Armenian Youth Federation, which plans to protest the marching band. Opponents to the march say the presence of the band, which represents the military glory of Turkey, is an affront to the largest Armenian population outside Armenia.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | June 8, 2011
“The motherland is best loved from afar,” I was told several times en route to Armenia late last month. When I arrived in Yerevan, the country’s capital and its largest city, this cautionary advice lingered in my mind as I rode by blocks of flashy casinos, my taxi zipping through the center of a city that's said to be 29 years older than Rome. My driver, a chubby man who chain-smoked and yelled out to other drivers at various stoplights, begged for more money as I handed him the fare.
NEWS
April 23, 2011
For the Armenian American community, presidential candidate Barack Obama was full of promise and hope. His position on the Armenian Genocide of 1915, in which 1.5 million Armenian were massacred at the hands of Ottoman Turks, had been well documented. It was genocide, he said. He even called on the federal government to officially recognize it as such. But in the years since winning the presidency, the pull of geo-political complications has so far muted his pledge to officially recognize the genocide.
FEATURES
April 28, 2009
Turkey speech not Obama’s first slip President Obama played Armenians for fools (“President comes up a word short,” Editorials, Saturday). I hope the Armenian American political party will wake up and stop endorsing politicians based on their empty promises. This year, Democrats controlled all three houses and did not have any excuse to not recognize the genocide. For years, they told us that it was Bush’s fault and their pressure, but how are they going to spin it this time around?
FEATURES
By Natalie Yemenidjian | September 17, 2008
Grish Davtian has studied at Tehran University in Iran and the University of London. The poet has since seen a countrywide revolution engulf his daily routine in Iran. After moving to the U.S., he created television programs, books, anthologies and organizations to increase knowledge and discussion of Armenian and English literature. Reporter Natalie Yemenidjian sat down with the 73-year-old Glendale resident and asked him a few questions about his life and experiences. When did you begin to write?
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|