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NEWS
November 11, 2004
The Pacific Park branch of the Glendale Public Library will host a special program focusing on Armenian-American heritage. Armenian Heritage & Culture vis-a-vis the American Identity begins 2 p.m. Saturday. A panel of guests will address keeping Armenian traditions alive in the U.S., backgrounds of Armenian families, influences on Armenian society and the Armenian language. Panelists include Ardashes Kassakhian, Nareg Keshishian, Tamar Kevonian, Jenny Kilejian, Roger Kupelian, Stepan Partamian, Anahid Oshagan, Serouj Ourishian and Garen Yegparian.
NEWS
By ANI AMIRKHANIAN | January 7, 2006
A little over five years ago, I noticed a trend among the Armenian diaspora families in Glendale. Armenians living in diaspora communities were concerned that their children would grow to lose their Armenian identity and become less in touch with their culture. As a result, many moved to Armenia, and immersed their children in the culture so that they would not forget their Armenian identity. I know families who made this bold move without ever questioning what their life would be like in a country that many Armenians flee in the first place.
NEWS
By ANI AMIRKHANIAN | December 23, 2006
This year, my family will be celebrating a somber holiday. With the passing of my grandmother earlier in the year, the family will be in a less festive mood than usual. Traditionally, Armenian families forgo the celebration of the holidays in times of death and mourning. A family get-together will often be in the memory of the loved one who passed away, but the celebration of the season will be kept to a minimum. Family members are not the only ones who are remembered.
NEWS
March 5, 2005
ANI AMIRKHANIAN When I was child, my brother and I had a typical sibling relationship. Our days consisted of peaceful harmony and then turned to rivalry that would end with one of us yelling and the other raising fists of fury in defense. My brother had the advantage of being bigger and taller, not to mention older, while I had the advantage of being the younger sibling, which sometimes meant I could "get away" with things. As the older sibling, my parents believed he needed to set the example.
NEWS
July 4, 2001
The tune of "Yesterday When I Was Young," sung by Andy Williams, filled the banquet hall of Brandview Collection, where 350 Armenian graduates celebrated a quarter-century of success in a free world. They were graduates of 1976 from Armenian high schools of Tehran, Iran. They came from as far as Europe to be part of that reunion and celebrate their common past. These graduates are the epitome of the Iranian modern golden era under the shah. All in their 40s, they received the best of the Eastern and the Western worlds.
NEWS
By Verzhine Nikoghosyan | February 14, 2012
Nearly 60 volunteers marched the streets of Glendale and Burbank on Monday to raise awareness and gain support for a new domestic violence help center that they hope will make inroads with Armenian families. Volunteers met in front of St. Peter Armenian Apostolic Church in Glendale and walked to St. Leon Armenian Apostolic Church in Burbank, marching under the slogan “Violence Hurts, Love Conquers.” Fr. Vazken Movsesian of St. Peter Armenian Apostolic Church in Glendale formed the domestic violence task force under the auspices of His Eminence Archbishop Hovnan Derderian, primate of the Western Diocese of the Armenian Church of North America.
NEWS
April 20, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- A group of Armenian youths reflected on their ethnic history Wednesdy night and celebrated a rebirth of their cultural identity. The Armenian Youth Cultural Organization commemorated the 85th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide during ceremonies in Parcher Plaza behind Glendale City Hall. More than 200 people attended the event that featured singing, dancing, essay reading and political speeches. The big attraction was art by Glendale-area teens, and men and women in their 20s highlighting Armenian history and culture.
NEWS
January 1, 2002
Karen S. Kim GLENDALE -- While some Glendale families are already taking down the old Christmas tree and packing up tinsel and ornaments until next year, many Armenian families in the community are just getting ready for the Christmas holiday to begin. Armenian Christmas falls on Sunday this year, as it's celebrated every year on Jan. 6 instead of Dec. 25. Armenian religious officials say Jan. 6 is the date that Christian churches used to celebrate Christmas until about the 4th century.
NEWS
January 28, 2002
Karen S. Kim NORTHEAST GLENDALE -- Their studio is just a borrowed office embellished with a makeshift wooden set left over from years ago and ivory sheets taped over the fluorescent ceiling bulbs to soften the lighting. Their set lighting and cameras are all borrowed, nearly all of their staff is young and unpaid, and their budget is minimal. But the 30 or so youths that work on "ANC-TV" -- a cable news show focusing on Armenian issues at the international, national and local level -- put in long hours to make the best with what they have.
NEWS
By Zanku Armenian | June 30, 2010
This past weekend was my son's baptism, which is an important moment for Armenian families, not just because of its religious significance, but also as a milestone where a new generation is welcomed into an extended family. It's a moment that imposes a pause in our busy lives and forces reflection. In the case of Armenian families, part of the indirect but inherent reflection is about the long multigenerational road traveled that includes tragic experiences of families torn apart by genocide and survival for the lucky few, and then dispersion to multiple countries trying to get economically established to provide basic necessities and education for the young.
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NEWS
By Verzhine Nikoghosyan | February 14, 2012
Nearly 60 volunteers marched the streets of Glendale and Burbank on Monday to raise awareness and gain support for a new domestic violence help center that they hope will make inroads with Armenian families. Volunteers met in front of St. Peter Armenian Apostolic Church in Glendale and walked to St. Leon Armenian Apostolic Church in Burbank, marching under the slogan “Violence Hurts, Love Conquers.” Fr. Vazken Movsesian of St. Peter Armenian Apostolic Church in Glendale formed the domestic violence task force under the auspices of His Eminence Archbishop Hovnan Derderian, primate of the Western Diocese of the Armenian Church of North America.
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NEWS
By Zanku Armenian | June 30, 2010
This past weekend was my son's baptism, which is an important moment for Armenian families, not just because of its religious significance, but also as a milestone where a new generation is welcomed into an extended family. It's a moment that imposes a pause in our busy lives and forces reflection. In the case of Armenian families, part of the indirect but inherent reflection is about the long multigenerational road traveled that includes tragic experiences of families torn apart by genocide and survival for the lucky few, and then dispersion to multiple countries trying to get economically established to provide basic necessities and education for the young.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | June 11, 2008
Glendale resident Sevak Ohanian recreates the problems of growing up in an Armenian American family in his new film “My Big Fat Armenian Family” but adds a twist of humor. The film, which will premiere July 12 and 18 at Glendale High School, tells the story of a family of four — a father, mother, son and daughter. The son can’t seem to do anything right in his father’s eyes, and there is a constant air of friction between them. The parents, Robert and Rima, are played by one man, Ajmin Baghramian, Ohanian said.
NEWS
By ANI AMIRKHANIAN | December 23, 2006
This year, my family will be celebrating a somber holiday. With the passing of my grandmother earlier in the year, the family will be in a less festive mood than usual. Traditionally, Armenian families forgo the celebration of the holidays in times of death and mourning. A family get-together will often be in the memory of the loved one who passed away, but the celebration of the season will be kept to a minimum. Family members are not the only ones who are remembered.
NEWS
By ANI AMIRKHANIAN | January 7, 2006
A little over five years ago, I noticed a trend among the Armenian diaspora families in Glendale. Armenians living in diaspora communities were concerned that their children would grow to lose their Armenian identity and become less in touch with their culture. As a result, many moved to Armenia, and immersed their children in the culture so that they would not forget their Armenian identity. I know families who made this bold move without ever questioning what their life would be like in a country that many Armenians flee in the first place.
NEWS
By: Tania Chatila | September 30, 2005
It has been nearly a month since Hurricane Katrina ripped through the Gulf Coast, killing hundreds, destroying infrastructure and homes and displacing hundreds of thousands of residents. And after a month, the amount people stuff into aid jars has dwindled. Virgil's general manager DeLaura Kurkowski said she has seen less money being put into the five-gallon water bottles set up at the hardware store's cash registers to collect funds for victims.
NEWS
March 5, 2005
ANI AMIRKHANIAN When I was child, my brother and I had a typical sibling relationship. Our days consisted of peaceful harmony and then turned to rivalry that would end with one of us yelling and the other raising fists of fury in defense. My brother had the advantage of being bigger and taller, not to mention older, while I had the advantage of being the younger sibling, which sometimes meant I could "get away" with things. As the older sibling, my parents believed he needed to set the example.
NEWS
January 8, 2005
ANI AMIRKHANIAN I am happy to say that after 20-plus years of living in the United States, my parents have finally made the wise decision to purchase a microwave. Unlike most families, who rely on kitchen appliances for the added convenience of quick and easy food preparation, my family, for the longest time, preferred more traditional methods of cooking and reheating meals. My Armenian mother, if I were to guess, has owned more than 100 pots and pans in her lifetime.
NEWS
November 11, 2004
The Pacific Park branch of the Glendale Public Library will host a special program focusing on Armenian-American heritage. Armenian Heritage & Culture vis-a-vis the American Identity begins 2 p.m. Saturday. A panel of guests will address keeping Armenian traditions alive in the U.S., backgrounds of Armenian families, influences on Armenian society and the Armenian language. Panelists include Ardashes Kassakhian, Nareg Keshishian, Tamar Kevonian, Jenny Kilejian, Roger Kupelian, Stepan Partamian, Anahid Oshagan, Serouj Ourishian and Garen Yegparian.
NEWS
April 24, 2004
Gary Moskowitz To Sarkis Asatryan, remembering the Armenian Genocide today is not enough. Asatryan, a Hoover High School senior of Armenian descent, believes people need to work hard to make sure that the 1.5 million Armenians killed between 1915 and 1923 did not die in vain. Since the Armenian Genocide began on the night of April 24, 1915, today marks its 89th anniversary. "My grandfather's brother was killed because he wanted to buy bread and the government would not let him, and he was beheaded," said Asatryan, 18. "I think the first step is to educate people not just about the Armenian Genocide, but the genocide of Native Americans, Cambodians, Serbs and Jews, and what an inhumane thing genocide is. "I think we are truly making an effort to make the Armenian Genocide known to the world.
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