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Armenian Genocide

NEWS
By Ruth Sowby | March 12, 2014
The ladies of the Oakmont League decided to have fun at their recent dinner meeting. The venue, the Beckham Grill in Pasadena, was only a hop, skip and a jump from Glendale. The group is commemorating 75 years of service in Glendale and the surrounding communities. Each event seems more celebratory than the last one. This one was strictly entertainment. In her encore appearance, former "Harlettes" star, Frannie McCartney strutted and pranced her way through several musical numbers.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 20, 2014
The front desk at Roslin Art Gallery used to be where Seeroon Yeretzian would sketch fantastical drawings of peacocks, serpents and colorful flora that, with a mix of oils and gold foil, took on an illuminated, glow-in-the-dark quality. VIDEO: Artist Seeroon Yeretzian painting "Heavenly Peacocks" But now, the Glendale artist sits at that same desk, mostly motionless, unable to draw. Her muscles have been frozen by a degenerative disease. “It's terrible. My hands are gone,” Yeretzian said, using her eyes to select each letter of her sentence on a computer screen that repeats her selections verbally, giving her a digital voice.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | February 12, 2014
While browsing in an antique shop in Oregon last summer, a tiny, glass bottle filled with grains of rice caught my eye. I picked it up and read the label. “The daily ration for 750 children in 1 Near East [Armenian] Relief Orphanage is 40 pounds of rice, less than 7/8 ounce per child. For lack of this small amount, they are turning children away by the thousands. Will you help?" The label included the names of Samuel C. Lancaster as state chairman and J.J. Handsaker as director and included an address of 606 Stock Exchange Bldg., Portland, Ore. There was no date or any other information.
COMMUNITY
By Nicole Charky, nicole.charky@latimes.com | February 11, 2014
Novelist Chris Bohjalian knows that he inherited a history of survival. As the descendant of Armenian genocide survivors, The New York Times best-selling author discovered resilience was in his blood, inspiring his epic love story “The Sandcastle Girls.” Library staff selected his work for Glendale's One Book/One City project, an open invitation for local residents to read a novel together. “They found me,” said Bohjalian, the first Armenian American author to be featured in the reading event in conversation with City Clerk Ardy Kassakhian at 7 p.m. on Feb. 27 at the Glendale Central Library.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 25, 2013
Sevan Kabakian moved with his wife and children, who were all born in Glendale, to Armenia with a plan. The couple knew where they'd enroll their three children in school. They knew Kabakian would have a job - working for Birthright Armenia, an organization that offers volunteer opportunities in that country for those of Armenian descent - leaving an 18-year career as an aerospace engineer behind. They knew they wanted to help build something. “All of us who move here, we kind of want to be part of this country's development,” said Kabakian, who moved in 2006.
COMMUNITY
By Joyce Rudolph | November 26, 2013
Officials with the Community Foundation of the Verdugos reported they reached more than $10 million in assets this year when donors, fund holders and key community representatives gathered for the organization's annual dinner in November at the Castaway restaurant in Burbank. “We are really excited about that,” said Edna Karinski, chief executive of the foundation. The organization's purpose is to link donors and their philanthropic interests with nonprofit causes within the communities of Glendale, Burbank, La Canada-Flintridge, La Crescenta, Montrose and Verdugo City.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
Local Armenian leaders urged President Obama on the same day of his arrival at DreamWorks Animation in Glendale to recognize the Armenian genocide and the refugee orphans who spent 10 months hand-knotting a tapestry to thank the United States for its humanitarian aid nearly a century ago.  Students from the Chamlian Armenian School, representatives from the Armenian National Committee of America and area clergy signed a letter describing why the...
NEWS
November 21, 2013
A News-Press article describes the signing of a petition urging President Barack Obama to display a rug woven by Armenian orphans in 1920. This was a time of struggle for Armenians. The world had suffered the first genocide of the 20th century where more than 1.5-million human beings were killed brutally. Men were castrated for no reproduction and even pregnant women were abused, raped and killed. Imagine dead bodies of more than a million innocent humans who were killed just because they were Armenian.
NEWS
By Richard Simon | November 12, 2013
In a new twist to efforts to call attention to the Armenian genocide, a group of lawmakers has accused the Obama administration of blocking a Smithsonian display of a rug woven by orphans of the mass killings about a century ago. The lawmakers have written President Obama urging him to make available the rug, presented in 1925 toPresident Calvin Coolidge and in storage as part of the White House collection, for exhibition. The bipartisan group includes more than a dozen representatives from California, which has a large Armenian American population, the Los Angeles Times reported .  The roughly 12-foot-by-18-foot Armenian Orphan Rug was to be featured in a Dec. 16 exhibit at the Smithsonian Castle in Washington that sought to call attention to a new book about the rug, which the lawmakers called a “pivotal icon related to the Armenian Genocide.” A White House spokeswoman said Tuesday that displaying the rug “for only half a day in connection with a private book launch event, as proposed, would have been an inappropriate use of U.S. government property, would have required the White House to undertake the risk of transporting the rug for limited public exposure, and was not viewed as commensurate with the rug's historical significance.” Aram S. Hamparian, executive director of the Armenian National Committee of America, attributed the decision to politics, contending it was due to the administration “catering to the Turkish government's...
NEWS
October 31, 2013
A petition on Whitehouse.gov is urging President Barack Obama to display a rug woven by Armenian orphans at a refugee camp in 1920. The tapestry was donated to President Calvin Coolidge in 1925, as a gift to thank Americans for their humanitarian support following World War I. The carpet has remained in storage and was expected to make its debut on Dec. 16 during a Smithsonian event and book launch for Hagop Martin Deranian's " ...
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