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By Terri Martin | June 16, 2010
T he exhibition, "Three Artists, One World," at the Burbank Creative Arts Center Gallery, highlights three markedly different artists in style and media. The common characteristic that threads the three together is their passion for the world, human equality, animal rights and children's security. The sculpture, painting and mixed media of Toni Scott commemorates the journey of "ceiling shattering" African Americans and honors their heritage with a clay bust of a Mangbetu woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | July 1, 2012
The second annual Russian and Ukrainian Painting Exhibition at the Silvana Gallery in Glendale consists of more than 100 paintings that retain techniques of the first generation of rebellious Russian Impressionists. The same turgid brushwork, out-of-tube pigment and other elements that once disguised the meanings in propagandistic art are used here by a new generation for narratives of life, architecture and landscape. Subject matter for this second generation of Russian and Ukrainian impressionists celebrates the life and land of the common people, no longer because Soviet sensors have secrets, but because after Perestroika in the 1990s, they have the freedom to choose the content in their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian McGackin | July 14, 2010
For centuries, artists and critics have argued the merits of form versus function in not only the art world, but in everyday life. It is often difficult to determine the specific role that art plays in our society when many pieces found in museums lack any discernible practicality. While aesthetic choices almost always play a role in which sculptures or paintings become priceless works of art and which are labeled junk, artist David D. Gilbaugh of La Crescenta has discovered a way to ensure that his work is appreciated beyond merely pleasing the eye. Gilbaugh is a sculptor who works primarily in paper clay, a forgiving type of clay that lends itself generously to a broad range of movements and positions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | February 25, 2012
The Forest Lawn Museum retrospective exhibition of Syd Mead's half-century career as designer, illustrator and artist is composed of more than just renderings of his curious futuristic inventions. Mead shapes a utopian future made believable. His visions of aerodynamic transportation, orbital architecture, sporting robots and interplanetary society are persuasive, delivered with ingenious perspective and fastidious detail. In his book, “Sentury II,” Mead calls auto design his first love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kirk Silsbee | April 15, 2012
The flurry of traditional Japanese arts and crafts in Southern California this month is not in Los Angeles proper. L.A. County Art Museum's majestic Pavilion for Japanese Art remains the West Coast's greatest showcase, but three unrelated Pasadena events form a fascinating cultural convergence. They signify a quietly strong century of Japanese-American history in the area. After a $6.8-million upgrade, the Huntington Library in San Marino has just reopened its historic Japanese Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | July 3, 2010
"The Artwork of Robert Brown: A Retrospective Exhibition of a Life's Work," is presented at the Brand Library Galleries after the fashion of a museum shop. The purpose of the exhibition is to raise funds to support free arts and cultural events programs at the Brand and to share Brown's art with the community. A prolific and master printmaker, Brown's limited-edition serigraphs are pinned to gallery walls and stacked on tables staged throughout the main room. One end of the gallery is lit up with Brown's glassworks — sculptures, panes, etched panels and plates capture and refract light from gallery windows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | June 9, 2010
T he range of artistic expression in the exhibition "Devise and Evolve" at the Brand Library is immediately visible. From explosions of color in paintings by Mary Addison Hackett to color management in Janet Bothne's two-piece diptych paintings; in minimalist sculpture by Alice Clements to abstract sculptural inventions of Julie Schustack, contrast defines the theme. Hackett exposes herself artistically with no pretense. Her work cannot be confined by the "isms" that define artistic movements, because she crosses disciplines fearlessly with the genuineness of movement makers like Arshile Gorky and Willem de Kooning, icons of modern art. Abstract Expressionism (nonobjective art)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kirk Silsbee | January 20, 2012
One of the unexpected dividends of the Getty's far-reaching “Pacific Standard Time” series is the cross-pollination of audiences and institutions; another is focused historic perspective. The Pacific Asia Museum, not known for modern-art exhibitions, is playing host to a modest retrospective of the influential Pasadena Art Museum. The former was initially housed in the Pacific Asia's building, hence the title of the show: “46 N. Robles: A History of the Pasadena Art Museum.” It's a nifty piece of site-specific heritage in the form of a mixed media art survey.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | July 1, 2012
The second annual Russian and Ukrainian Painting Exhibition at the Silvana Gallery in Glendale consists of more than 100 paintings that retain techniques of the first generation of rebellious Russian Impressionists. The same turgid brushwork, out-of-tube pigment and other elements that once disguised the meanings in propagandistic art are used here by a new generation for narratives of life, architecture and landscape. Subject matter for this second generation of Russian and Ukrainian impressionists celebrates the life and land of the common people, no longer because Soviet sensors have secrets, but because after Perestroika in the 1990s, they have the freedom to choose the content in their work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kirk Silsbee | April 15, 2012
The flurry of traditional Japanese arts and crafts in Southern California this month is not in Los Angeles proper. L.A. County Art Museum's majestic Pavilion for Japanese Art remains the West Coast's greatest showcase, but three unrelated Pasadena events form a fascinating cultural convergence. They signify a quietly strong century of Japanese-American history in the area. After a $6.8-million upgrade, the Huntington Library in San Marino has just reopened its historic Japanese Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | February 25, 2012
The Forest Lawn Museum retrospective exhibition of Syd Mead's half-century career as designer, illustrator and artist is composed of more than just renderings of his curious futuristic inventions. Mead shapes a utopian future made believable. His visions of aerodynamic transportation, orbital architecture, sporting robots and interplanetary society are persuasive, delivered with ingenious perspective and fastidious detail. In his book, “Sentury II,” Mead calls auto design his first love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kirk Silsbee | January 20, 2012
One of the unexpected dividends of the Getty's far-reaching “Pacific Standard Time” series is the cross-pollination of audiences and institutions; another is focused historic perspective. The Pacific Asia Museum, not known for modern-art exhibitions, is playing host to a modest retrospective of the influential Pasadena Art Museum. The former was initially housed in the Pacific Asia's building, hence the title of the show: “46 N. Robles: A History of the Pasadena Art Museum.” It's a nifty piece of site-specific heritage in the form of a mixed media art survey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian McGackin | July 17, 2010
For centuries, artists and critics have argued the merits of form versus function in not only the art world, but in everyday life. It is often difficult to determine the specific role that art plays in our society when many pieces found in museums lack any discernible practicality. While aesthetic choices almost always play a role in which sculptures or paintings become priceless works of art and which are labeled junk, artist David D. Gilbaugh of La Crescenta has discovered a way to ensure that his work is appreciated beyond merely pleasing the eye. Gilbaugh is a sculptor who works primarily in paper clay, a forgiving type of clay that lends itself generously to a broad range of movements and positions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | July 3, 2010
"The Artwork of Robert Brown: A Retrospective Exhibition of a Life's Work," is presented at the Brand Library Galleries after the fashion of a museum shop. The purpose of the exhibition is to raise funds to support free arts and cultural events programs at the Brand and to share Brown's art with the community. A prolific and master printmaker, Brown's limited-edition serigraphs are pinned to gallery walls and stacked on tables staged throughout the main room. One end of the gallery is lit up with Brown's glassworks — sculptures, panes, etched panels and plates capture and refract light from gallery windows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | June 16, 2010
T he exhibition, "Three Artists, One World," at the Burbank Creative Arts Center Gallery, highlights three markedly different artists in style and media. The common characteristic that threads the three together is their passion for the world, human equality, animal rights and children's security. The sculpture, painting and mixed media of Toni Scott commemorates the journey of "ceiling shattering" African Americans and honors their heritage with a clay bust of a Mangbetu woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | June 12, 2010
T he mid-20th century was a fertile time for the invention of artistic movements. Minor movements bridged the major movements; Surrealism made the transition to abstract Expressionism through an artistic style that was coined abstract Impressionism. The exhibition of paintings by Harold Olov Wang at Towns-Burr Gallery strongly represents this mini movement with a revival of the technique. Although Wang was a contemporary of movement masters like Hans Hofmann, Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, he did not participate in the world of abstract art until 2000 when, at the age of 89, he put brush to canvas and revolutionized abstract Impressionism.
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