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NEWS
July 13, 2005
Darleene Barrientos Students were not the cause of the commotion on Jefferson Elementary School's blacktop for once Tuesday. This time it came from construction trucks breaking up and scooping away the asphalt, in preparation for a new surface. The construction began just four days after the first day of school at Jefferson Elementary, the only school in the district with a year-round schedule that is the same for all students. But students were not too worried about a lack of access to their blacktop until August, they said, because the alternative activities provided by teachers and administrators are just as fun. "It's kind of the same because recess is still good," 10-year-old Andre Davidian said.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | October 4, 2013
One of Glendale Unified's oldest schools is in the running for a $1-million grant that would transform its asphalt-dominated campus into a modern environmental beacon. The parents of children who attend Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, Glendale's foreign language magnet school that attracts students from throughout the city and beyond, are the driving force behind the grant proposal. Their concern is over the environmental sustainability of the school, which is located 450 feet from the Golden State (5)
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | November 11, 2010
CITY HALL — Parents from Glendale Adventist Academy on Wednesday rallied for the installation of artificial turf on the school's playground, pointing out instances when several children fell on the asphalt and suffered cuts, bruises and broken bones. The school submitted an application with the city's Community Planning Department to install artificial turf on its 14,800-square-foot playground in the 700 block of Kimlin Drive, replacing the current asphalt material. The kindergarten through 12th grade school is located in a residential zone where artificial turf isn't allowed in publicly viewable areas — a rule that has been the source of debate and contention for months.
COMMUNITY
February 13, 2014
Funeral Services are set for Sunday, Feb. 16 in Glendale, for longtime asphalt industry leader Douglas L. Goode of La Crescenta. He was 72. Goode's great-grandfather, E.D. Goode, was a prominent civic leader and one of the founders of the city of Glendale, and his house, located on Cedar Street, is a historical landmark. There is also a street named after him - Goode Avenue - that runs along the 134 freeway in Glendale. Leo D. Goode was the owner of one of the first asphalt plants in Los Angeles County.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
RUBBER ROADS Rubberized asphalt was given the green light for sections of four Glendale streets after the City Council unanimously approved a request from Public Works officials to pursue state grant funding. Four streets — including portions of Glenoaks Boulevard, Los Feliz Road, Piedmont Avenue and Verdugo Road — will be included in the grant application, which request funding for more than 9,600 tons of the mixed asphalt. While the California Integrated Waste Management Board has already approved more than $3 million for the Waste Tire Recycling Management Program for fiscal year 2007-08, it has not yet allocated funds for future years.
NEWS
June 11, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum When Armine Hacopian goes shopping, she usually drives from north Glendale into south Glendale on Verdugo Road and Glendale Avenue, a trip that takes about 15 minutes. Over the past three months, those 15 minutes have stretched to 30, thanks to familiar, frustrating orange signs and cones that mean road construction. "No matter what time of the day, it's very difficult to go through," said Hacopian, who is a member of the board of trustees at Glendale Community College.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
Here are some of issues the City Council will consider today: RUBBERIZED ASPHALT The improvement of Foothill Boulevard from Cypress Avenue to La Canada Boulevard is part of the city's plans for the 2004-05 fiscal year. The project proposes to resurface this portion of the street with rubberized asphalt and concrete pavement. The City Council will consider authorizing the submittal of an application to a state grant program. If awarded, the grant would give $6,500 for the project.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | October 13, 2006
An informational meeting was hosted Tuesday night at the La Cañada Flintridge Country Club by Caltrans to discuss upcoming construction on Angeles Crest Highway (North Highway 2). Although the construction and delays will affect many, the meeting was attended by a mere handful of locals. "We are conducting this workshop to inform you of the project," said Mirna Dagher, Caltrans project manager for the project. "Construction will start at 330 feet west of [Hwy. 2] and 210 freeway, all the way to the San Bernardino county line."
NEWS
June 16, 2005
LEGAL ACTION The City Council has ordered the city attorney to take legal action against two Glendale property owners to correct health and safety violations. One of the homes, located on North Louise Street, has a roof that is in a "very bad state of disrepair," Councilman Ara Najarian said. The other, on Stocker Street, involves a second-floor condominium in which the owner illegally installed marble flooring throughout the unit. The installation violated city codes because the weight of the flooring exceeds what the building is designed for and poses a danger to residents on the first floor.
NEWS
August 15, 2006
Swapping trees for asphalt cause of heat Regarding "City's leafy moniker is in jeopardy" (Mailbag, July 27). As a decades-long, deep-rooted Glendale denizen, I remember when Fremont Park was raided by the city for some of its signature palm trees ? purportedly at the behest of a hotel-owner/landscaper (read: campaign contributions) somewhere in Glendale. Note the swath of dirt where the spike-gouged grass and those removed trees used to be next time you're there. Now by an unpleasantly amazing coincidence, a "newcomer" neighbor/owner recently cut down three trees on his duplex property very close by to where I rent.
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COMMUNITY
February 13, 2014
Funeral Services are set for Sunday, Feb. 16 in Glendale, for longtime asphalt industry leader Douglas L. Goode of La Crescenta. He was 72. Goode's great-grandfather, E.D. Goode, was a prominent civic leader and one of the founders of the city of Glendale, and his house, located on Cedar Street, is a historical landmark. There is also a street named after him - Goode Avenue - that runs along the 134 freeway in Glendale. Leo D. Goode was the owner of one of the first asphalt plants in Los Angeles County.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | October 4, 2013
One of Glendale Unified's oldest schools is in the running for a $1-million grant that would transform its asphalt-dominated campus into a modern environmental beacon. The parents of children who attend Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, Glendale's foreign language magnet school that attracts students from throughout the city and beyond, are the driving force behind the grant proposal. Their concern is over the environmental sustainability of the school, which is located 450 feet from the Golden State (5)
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | November 11, 2010
CITY HALL — Parents from Glendale Adventist Academy on Wednesday rallied for the installation of artificial turf on the school's playground, pointing out instances when several children fell on the asphalt and suffered cuts, bruises and broken bones. The school submitted an application with the city's Community Planning Department to install artificial turf on its 14,800-square-foot playground in the 700 block of Kimlin Drive, replacing the current asphalt material. The kindergarten through 12th grade school is located in a residential zone where artificial turf isn't allowed in publicly viewable areas — a rule that has been the source of debate and contention for months.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
RUBBER ROADS Rubberized asphalt was given the green light for sections of four Glendale streets after the City Council unanimously approved a request from Public Works officials to pursue state grant funding. Four streets — including portions of Glenoaks Boulevard, Los Feliz Road, Piedmont Avenue and Verdugo Road — will be included in the grant application, which request funding for more than 9,600 tons of the mixed asphalt. While the California Integrated Waste Management Board has already approved more than $3 million for the Waste Tire Recycling Management Program for fiscal year 2007-08, it has not yet allocated funds for future years.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | October 13, 2006
An informational meeting was hosted Tuesday night at the La Cañada Flintridge Country Club by Caltrans to discuss upcoming construction on Angeles Crest Highway (North Highway 2). Although the construction and delays will affect many, the meeting was attended by a mere handful of locals. "We are conducting this workshop to inform you of the project," said Mirna Dagher, Caltrans project manager for the project. "Construction will start at 330 feet west of [Hwy. 2] and 210 freeway, all the way to the San Bernardino county line."
NEWS
August 15, 2006
Swapping trees for asphalt cause of heat Regarding "City's leafy moniker is in jeopardy" (Mailbag, July 27). As a decades-long, deep-rooted Glendale denizen, I remember when Fremont Park was raided by the city for some of its signature palm trees ? purportedly at the behest of a hotel-owner/landscaper (read: campaign contributions) somewhere in Glendale. Note the swath of dirt where the spike-gouged grass and those removed trees used to be next time you're there. Now by an unpleasantly amazing coincidence, a "newcomer" neighbor/owner recently cut down three trees on his duplex property very close by to where I rent.
NEWS
By By Fred Ortega | January 9, 2006
Street resurfacing and other work will cost $1.4 million; construction slated to begin in May.CITY HALL -- Work has barely begun on the remaining stretch of roadway of the Brand Boulevard Improvement Project, but city officials have already turned their focus to the southern portion of the city's main drag. The City Council will review final plans Tuesday for the South Brand Boulevard Rehabilitation Project, a $1.45- to $1.65-million revamp of the boulevard from Colorado Street to San Fernando Road.
NEWS
July 25, 2005
Fred Ortega The City Council will vote Tuesday on who will get to build the next phase of the Brand Boulevard Improvements Project, a $2.3 million job that will replace asphalt and sidewalks for a stretch of the boulevard between Milford and Doran streets. City staff members are recommending that the lucrative contract go to Downey-based Shawnan Construction, the company that is in the process of completing Phase I of the improvement project, a $7.92-million endeavor that began in April.
NEWS
July 13, 2005
Darleene Barrientos Students were not the cause of the commotion on Jefferson Elementary School's blacktop for once Tuesday. This time it came from construction trucks breaking up and scooping away the asphalt, in preparation for a new surface. The construction began just four days after the first day of school at Jefferson Elementary, the only school in the district with a year-round schedule that is the same for all students. But students were not too worried about a lack of access to their blacktop until August, they said, because the alternative activities provided by teachers and administrators are just as fun. "It's kind of the same because recess is still good," 10-year-old Andre Davidian said.
NEWS
June 16, 2005
LEGAL ACTION The City Council has ordered the city attorney to take legal action against two Glendale property owners to correct health and safety violations. One of the homes, located on North Louise Street, has a roof that is in a "very bad state of disrepair," Councilman Ara Najarian said. The other, on Stocker Street, involves a second-floor condominium in which the owner illegally installed marble flooring throughout the unit. The installation violated city codes because the weight of the flooring exceeds what the building is designed for and poses a danger to residents on the first floor.
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