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NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | July 21, 2009
Jupiter is showing off an earth-size scar after being struck by a mystery object, scientists at the La Cañada based Jet Propulsion Laboratory confirmed Monday. An Australian amateur astronomer, Anthony Wesley, reported the dark mark near the planet’s South Pole. JPL scientists used NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii to confirm the astral event. “We have a dedicated team of amateur astronomers across the world that observes Jupiter just for fun. Anthony is very good at keeping records of what he sees,” said Leigh Fletcher, JPL planetary scientist.
SPORTS
By Charles Rich | June 26, 2007
Anaheim ? Less than halfway through the season, it appears the Houston Astros are thankful they made a wise investment. The Astros lost starting shortstop Adam Everett to a serious knee injury June 14 when he fractured his right fibula in a violent collision with robust outfielder Carlos Lee. Everett will likely miss the next two months. Fortunately for the Astros, they have been able to alleviate the concerns of Everett's absence by turning to a former area star to provide quality at bats and defensive stability around the infield.
NEWS
By Natalie Yemenidjian | October 29, 2008
At 8:45 a.m. Tuesday, Henry Avetisian and his fellow classmates gazed at the starry sky. “I like when the [guest speaker] took us into the past and then the future,” the 9-year-old said. Marcio Tomic, of Sky Dome Planetarium, took about 20 students more than 10,000 years into the future after leading them through a small tunnel Tuesday into the mobile planetarium in the auditorium of Salem Lutheran School. “This is Polaris, or the North Star, tonight,” Tomic said to the class as he pointed to the star with a laser pointer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | June 17, 2009
Bob Alborzian is giving novice astronomers a glimpse of a whole new world through his Sidewalk Astronomers group. The 64-year-old Burbank resident conducts stargazing events once a month at the Chandler Bikeway at Chandler Boulevard and Lima Street. Members bring out their telescopes, and the public can take a peek at the moon, stars, Venus and other planets — if the skies are clear. “We always emphasize ‘weather permitting,’” Alborzian said. “It all depends on whatever the exterior decorator has planned.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | February 15, 2008
Students gazed up at a starry sky from the inside of the auditorium at Chamlian Armenian School on Thursday, picking out constellations and locating the North Star. The children learned about the solar system and the Milky Way galaxy while ensconced under a billowing tarp known as the Sky Dome Planetarium. The mobile planetarium, which is a program run by Mobile Ed Productions, a Michigan-based educational programming company, was spending the day at the school for the first time to teach students about astronomy, said Rita Kaprielian, the school’s vice principal.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | May 15, 2013
They traveled more than 200 miles from the San Gabriel Valley to reach one of the darkest corners in Southern California. Three hours before sunset on Saturday, half a dozen amateur astronomers unloaded high-powered telescopes onto a concrete platform next to a group campground in the Mojave National Preserve, about 115 miles east of Barstow. One of the instruments would later be used to tour galaxies - including our own - while others would show the Cassini Division between Saturn's rings, and the moons orbiting Jupiter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2007
Morrie Dukes was named manager of Sparky’s Market in the 2900 block of Honolulu Avenue. He planned to add a bakery section and coffee corner to the store, and said he also hoped to expand the wine selection there.   The drama “The Living Constitution” was presented by Masons to an appreciate audience that filled the auditorium at La Cañada High School. The event was in commemoration of the Bicentennial of the signing of the U.S. Constitution and was sponsored by the Crescenta Valley, Tujunga and La Cañada-Oakwood Masonic lodges.
NEWS
January 19, 2007
Anti-violence message presented The Glendale Commission on the Status of Women is partnering with the Glendale School District to present Yellow Ribbon Week this week to raise awareness of non-violent conflict resolution. The commission has donated $3,500 of materials on the subject to 23 schools. Diamond awards nominations sought The Glendale Cultural Affairs office is looking for nominations of individuals and groups for Diamond Awards, celebrating outstanding achievement in the arts.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
The largest asteroid to come in close contact with Earth is set to fly by our planet Friday morning. The rock, called Asteroid 2012 DA14, is 150 feet in diameter and will fly around 27,000 km above the surface of Earth. The moon is roughly 384,400 km from Earth. NASA astronomers have said there is no chance of an impact. The close encounter will take place around 11 a.m. Unfortunately, you won't be able to see the rock during the day, even with a small telescope. But NASA will stream images and live commentary from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on NASA TV . Images from Europe and Australia will be shown starting at 9 a.m. Commentary from JPL starts at 11 a.m. The broadcast is available online at: www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2 and www.nasa.gov/ntv . -- Tiffany Kelly, Times Community News Follow Tiffany Kelly on Google+ and on Twitter @LATiffanyKelly .
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NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | May 15, 2013
They traveled more than 200 miles from the San Gabriel Valley to reach one of the darkest corners in Southern California. Three hours before sunset on Saturday, half a dozen amateur astronomers unloaded high-powered telescopes onto a concrete platform next to a group campground in the Mojave National Preserve, about 115 miles east of Barstow. One of the instruments would later be used to tour galaxies - including our own - while others would show the Cassini Division between Saturn's rings, and the moons orbiting Jupiter.
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NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | July 22, 2009
Jupiter is showing off an Earth-size scar after being struck by a mystery object, scientists at the La Cañada-based Jet Propulsion Laboratory confirmed Monday. An Australian amateur astronomer, Anthony Wesley, reported the dark mark near the planet’s south pole. JPL scientists used NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii to confirm the astral event. “We have a dedicated team of amateur astronomers across the world that observes Jupiter just for fun. Anthony is very good at keeping records of what he sees,” said Leigh Fletcher, JPL planetary scientist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | June 17, 2009
Bob Alborzian is giving novice astronomers a glimpse of a whole new world through his Sidewalk Astronomers group. The 64-year-old Burbank resident conducts stargazing events once a month at the Chandler Bikeway at Chandler Boulevard and Lima Street. Members bring out their telescopes, and the public can take a peek at the moon, stars, Venus and other planets — if the skies are clear. “We always emphasize ‘weather permitting,’” Alborzian said. “It all depends on whatever the exterior decorator has planned.
NEWS
By Natalie Yemenidjian | October 29, 2008
At 8:45 a.m. Tuesday, Henry Avetisian and his fellow classmates gazed at the starry sky. “I like when the [guest speaker] took us into the past and then the future,” the 9-year-old said. Marcio Tomic, of Sky Dome Planetarium, took about 20 students more than 10,000 years into the future after leading them through a small tunnel Tuesday into the mobile planetarium in the auditorium of Salem Lutheran School. “This is Polaris, or the North Star, tonight,” Tomic said to the class as he pointed to the star with a laser pointer.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | February 15, 2008
Students gazed up at a starry sky from the inside of the auditorium at Chamlian Armenian School on Thursday, picking out constellations and locating the North Star. The children learned about the solar system and the Milky Way galaxy while ensconced under a billowing tarp known as the Sky Dome Planetarium. The mobile planetarium, which is a program run by Mobile Ed Productions, a Michigan-based educational programming company, was spending the day at the school for the first time to teach students about astronomy, said Rita Kaprielian, the school’s vice principal.
SPORTS
By Charles Rich | June 26, 2007
Anaheim ? Less than halfway through the season, it appears the Houston Astros are thankful they made a wise investment. The Astros lost starting shortstop Adam Everett to a serious knee injury June 14 when he fractured his right fibula in a violent collision with robust outfielder Carlos Lee. Everett will likely miss the next two months. Fortunately for the Astros, they have been able to alleviate the concerns of Everett's absence by turning to a former area star to provide quality at bats and defensive stability around the infield.
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