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NEWS
April 26, 2013
Thank you for the front-page story covering the Walk Now for Autism Speaks event (“ Concerned about the danger, but still walking ,” April 21). In 2002 I was one of a small group of volunteer parents who had this idea of putting on a walk to raise money for autism research and awareness, which at the time was affecting approximately one in 250 children. To see what started back then with 1,400 attendees grow to an event that brings 40,000 families, friends and service providers together is so inspiring, and the potential danger from the week's events in Boston didn't affect the mood.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | May 3, 2007
GLENDALE — New courses aimed at improving communication skills of students with autism — the first courses of their kind for Glendale Unified School District's special education programs — passed the first step in the district's approval process Tuesday. Board of Education members reviewed three new courses of study — social communications I, II and III — that would directly address some of the greatest challenges students with autism face in the world outside the educational setting, said Greg Franklin, assistant superintendent, educational services.
NEWS
April 28, 2003
If you live in California today, chances are you or someone you know has a child with autism. Autism is the third most-common developmental disability in the United States today, affecting nearly 500,000 people. In California alone, the number of children diagnosed with autism skyrocketed 273% between 1987 and 1998. Today, nine new cases of autism are diagnosed every day -- more than 18,500 new cases each year. Despite these alarming rates, autism remains a mystery to the majority of the public, and many medical and educational professionals are still not fully aware of the disease's effects and best treatments.
NEWS
December 26, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman State Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Glendale) is the chairman of the Assembly Committee on Health, but his real inspiration for legislation he intends to introduce came closer to home. Two of his cousins have children who are autistic. "They're tenacious advocates for their kids," he said. "In that process, I've learned some of the barriers parents face. It's a real struggle and it's heartbreaking to watch." Frommer intends to introduce a bill that would establish an ombudsman to help parents of autistic children get state services to deal with the disorder.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | October 20, 2006
I suspected that there would be feedback from last week's article about boys and girls. Most of my mail was from the ladies who were either in agreement or were appreciative that a male would even suggest that females should take a more active role in running this world of ours. There were a few grumpy males who took umbrage at the suggestion. One snidely commended me for being in touch with my feminine side; another was sure that I was needing to score a few points with the ladies in my life.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | March 25, 2008
As Angie Barajas was getting on the highway in Burbank earlier this month, one of her twin sons, Justin Flores, tried to get her attention from the back seat of the car. But it was typical for Barajas? sons ? who are 8 and autistic ? to try to communicate with her while she was driving. She initially told Justin that she had to concentrate and couldn?t talk to him at the moment. But Justin was insistent, she said, continuing to say, ?Momma.? And he had her full attention when, a few seconds later, he said his brother?
NEWS
June 25, 2010
I agree, it's time to get tough on government spending and management of programs ("Political Landscape: Bill tough on government," June 17). The passage of the Government Efficiency, Effectiveness and Performance Improvement Act, co-sponsored by Rep. Adam Schiff, is a welcome ray of light on a problem that concerns us all. Too often, the performance of government agencies is seen as either overbearing or asleep at the switch. For many informed observers of the activities of government agencies, the Government Efficiency and Performance Improvement Act is a major step toward eliminating mismanagement and waste in government.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | July 20, 2010
After a one-year hiatus because of the sputtering economy, the Glendale tradition in which motorcycle riders hit the hills to raise money for charity will return Nov. 7. This year's Love Ride will be limited to 1,000 riders as they rumble from Glendale to the site of the original event — Calamigas Ranch in Malibu. "We wanted to go back to our roots and start over again," said Harley-Davidson of Glendale owner Oliver Shokouh, who started the Love Ride and watch it grow to 20,000 people in 2008.
NEWS
By: | September 24, 2005
Actor to speak at Race for the Cure Emmy Award-winning actor Patricia Arquette will be a guest at the 14th Annual Komen Orange County Race for the Cure on Sunday at Fashion Island. Arquette, who stars in the television drama series "Medium," lost her mother to breast cancer in 1997. Sunday she will join an expected crowd of more than 30,000. The race, which is presented by the Orange County affiliate of the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, has raised more than $11 million since it began in 1992.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | September 10, 2013
After several challenging encounters with people with autism, Glendale police officers are learning to identify symptoms of the disorder and diffuse tense situations involving autistic people. About 18 months ago, officers responding to a robbery call attempted to stop a suspect running along Glendale Avenue when the man - who stood more than 6 feet tall, weighed 220 pounds and was wearing dark sunglasses - became physically combative and was unresponsive to their commands. It was only after police subdued him with a Taser jolt that his frenzy subsided and his mental condition became apparent.
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NEWS
April 26, 2013
Thank you for the front-page story covering the Walk Now for Autism Speaks event (“ Concerned about the danger, but still walking ,” April 21). In 2002 I was one of a small group of volunteer parents who had this idea of putting on a walk to raise money for autism research and awareness, which at the time was affecting approximately one in 250 children. To see what started back then with 1,400 attendees grow to an event that brings 40,000 families, friends and service providers together is so inspiring, and the potential danger from the week's events in Boston didn't affect the mood.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
Don Short and Tamara Mark's encounter with law enforcement hasn't always been positive, especially when they have been trying to care for their two autistic sons. During a family trip in Hawaii, Short had to restrain one of the couple's son's - 10-year-old Harry, who is nonverbal and prone to injuring himself - because he became extremely agitated at a Honolulu airport. But to the public, his actions looked like child abuse. He was reported to airport police. As Short tried to calm his son, police warned him to let go of his son. He reluctantly complied.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | July 20, 2010
After a one-year hiatus because of the sputtering economy, the Glendale tradition in which motorcycle riders hit the hills to raise money for charity will return Nov. 7. This year's Love Ride will be limited to 1,000 riders as they rumble from Glendale to the site of the original event — Calamigas Ranch in Malibu. "We wanted to go back to our roots and start over again," said Harley-Davidson of Glendale owner Oliver Shokouh, who started the Love Ride and watch it grow to 20,000 people in 2008.
NEWS
June 25, 2010
I agree, it's time to get tough on government spending and management of programs ("Political Landscape: Bill tough on government," June 17). The passage of the Government Efficiency, Effectiveness and Performance Improvement Act, co-sponsored by Rep. Adam Schiff, is a welcome ray of light on a problem that concerns us all. Too often, the performance of government agencies is seen as either overbearing or asleep at the switch. For many informed observers of the activities of government agencies, the Government Efficiency and Performance Improvement Act is a major step toward eliminating mismanagement and waste in government.
NEWS
By Michael J. Arvizu | June 21, 2010
I n 1974, Judy Weber's son, Tobin, was dealing with autism so severe that it would manifest itself as destructive behavior. "He faced state hospitalization," she said. At the time, Weber was serving on a committee serving autistic children within the Los Angeles Unified School District. Tobin was living at UCLA, where researchers were using him as a subject for early autism research. When UCLA was close to completing their research, Weber became frustrated when she found that no school would take Tobin due to the severity of his autism.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | March 25, 2008
As Angie Barajas was getting on the highway in Burbank earlier this month, one of her twin sons, Justin Flores, tried to get her attention from the back seat of the car. But it was typical for Barajas? sons ? who are 8 and autistic ? to try to communicate with her while she was driving. She initially told Justin that she had to concentrate and couldn?t talk to him at the moment. But Justin was insistent, she said, continuing to say, ?Momma.? And he had her full attention when, a few seconds later, he said his brother?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007
The Foothill Autism Alliance, Inc. is proud to offer free monthly family resource seminars. The next seminar will be on Wednesday, June 13, from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at Pasadena Child Development Associates. Topics will include "Recreational Programs for Kids and Adults with Autism" and will feature speakers from the Glendale and Pasadena Parks & Recreation, Special Olympics, YMCA and the Rose Bowl Aquatics program. Pasadena Child Development Associates is located at 620 N. Lake Ave., second floor, in Pasadena (just north of the 210 freeway)
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | May 3, 2007
GLENDALE — New courses aimed at improving communication skills of students with autism — the first courses of their kind for Glendale Unified School District's special education programs — passed the first step in the district's approval process Tuesday. Board of Education members reviewed three new courses of study — social communications I, II and III — that would directly address some of the greatest challenges students with autism face in the world outside the educational setting, said Greg Franklin, assistant superintendent, educational services.
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