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By Fred Enslow | July 29, 2009
I disagree with Sharon Weisman’s July 27 letter, “Single-payer is the way to go.” She is right when she says Canadians have a longer life expectancy — about one year longer. She is right about the infant mortality rate, which is slightly lower in Canada, however, so is their birth rate, and some believe that is connected to poor prenatal care. If she is right about the 45 million people without health care, how many millions are afraid to come forward for health care due to illegal immigration problems?
NEWS
March 8, 2002
Mr. Kirk Cameron, in his letter of March 5, nails me for not knowing that there's a lot of water "in them hills"! My question was not answered: "Point out where all that water is." My information on the (lack) of water comes from the people who live up there, a hike into Oakmont V, the owners of the property, and the group of city officials, owners and other parties who hiked up there a week ago. None of these people have found any water, during the dry season, in Oakmont V. I was very clear about this time of year, also.
FEATURES
By Chuck Sambar | March 15, 2006
Nearly half of the public schools in California are experiencing serious decline in enrollment and Glendale is among them, since our schools have lost nearly 2,000 students during the past three years. The decline in enrollment is due to a variety of reasons including an out-of-reach cost of housing, a lower birth rate, an aging population, a local service economy with too many low-paying jobs, flight to neighboring states and a lack of affordable rentals. Another factor in Glendale's declining enrollment has been the increase in private, religious and charter schools.
NEWS
August 31, 2001
I have tried to stay indifferent to the issue of genocide commemoration that has been a battleground in the Glendale community for over a year now. I had convinced myself that it is a silly thing to argue over, that there are more serious issues to be concerned with. But it is becoming increasingly apparent that the bickering over how Glendale should commemorate the Armenian Genocide has deeper roots. The arguments by the opponents of lowering of the flag reveal that the real issue is whether the genocide should be commemorated at all. The fact is that a sector of Glendale residents don't want to be bothered with it. The opponents who have now initiated the mayoral recall claim that ethnicity has little to do with their opposing position.
NEWS
February 26, 2005
Stabilizing population growth imperative The recent rains have demonstrated how fragile human-built structures really are. The news shows ugly hillside scars strewn with debris of people's homes and lives, making it clear how little we can control nature. Damage is worst where man has been most active. The massive 280-home Whitebird Inc., development planned for the Verdugo Mountains should be scaled down if it cannot be scrapped altogether. ("Locals to make L.A. plea for hills," Feb. 23.)
NEWS
March 19, 2005
What is the most important issue facing the district? Our most important issue is always twofold: how to continue to challenge all students to reach high standards while keeping them safe. How to do those things with less funding is a particular challenge. Should schools be shifted back to a traditional calendar? And what are the benefits to students? Nine Glendale Unified School District schools entered year-round education because they had to; there wasn't room for the students.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil | April 15, 2013
Students go to college to earn high marks. Now Glendale Community College has a report card of its own. The California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office Tuesday released performance profiles for each of the system's 112 campuses, a new accountability feature known as the Student Success Scorecard. Born out of the Student Success Task Force that was assembled in 2011 to modernize the mission of California community colleges, the scorecard details certificate and degree attainment, transfer rates and other data.
NEWS
By Chuck Sambar | March 2, 2007
In 2001, enrollment in the Glendale schools was 30,374 students. This year, the enrollment is 27,492, a loss of 2882 students. The impact of this decline is a loss of basic revenue of $5,525.00 per student annually for a decline in district income of $15.9 million. This decrease in income presents challenges that require leadership, managerial skill, thoughtful planning, and respectful collaboration. Glendale is not unique in its enrollment decline since more than one half of the school districts in California are experiencing similar declines.
NEWS
By Chuck Sambar | March 3, 2007
In 2001, enrollment in the Glendale schools was 30,374 students. This year, the enrollment is 27,492, a loss of 2,882 students. The impact of this decline is a loss of basic revenue of $5,525 per student annually for a decline in district income of $15.9 million. This decrease in income presents challenges that require leadership, managerial skill, thoughtful planning and respectful collaboration. Glendale is not unique in its enrollment decline, since more than one half of the school districts in California are experiencing similar declines.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | October 26, 2010
Enrollment at Glendale Unified declined for the seventh consecutive year to 26,393 students, which will mean a loss of about $1.3 million in state funding, district officials said Monday. But the drop of 266 students was not as dramatic as anticipated, said Alex Rojas, director of student support services. The district originally planned for a loss of 463 students. "While we are 266 shorter in terms of the number of kids who are enrolled, the good thing is our projected enrollment numbers were slightly more aggressive," Rojas said.
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