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Bottled Water

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FEATURES
December 23, 2006
S ome religious groups, such as the National Coalition of American Nuns, are calling for followers to refrain from drinking bottled water. They say a God-given resource such as water is not something to be packaged and sold while access to drinking water is so scarce in the poorest regions of the world. Water should be free for all, they say. Bottled-water advocates say targeting bottled-water companies is misguided, given the many products that use water, and will not lead to solutions to resource scarcity in poor regions of the world.
FEATURES
October 27, 2009
Do you spend hard-earned dollars on bottled water, thinking it comes from some exotic distant location and must be safer than what comes from the tap? Don’t be fooled by pretty labels. Check the source of your next bottle of water. Many companies hope you will skip the fine print and be foolish enough to pay for a product containing essentially the same water that flows to Southern California from northern sources, and is delivered through the tap by our publicly subsidized, publicly regulated municipal water systems.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | March 10, 2007
GLENDALE — About 2,400 bottles of Jermuk mineral water are being recalled from stores after they were found to contain unacceptable levels of arsenic. The order to recall Jermuk Natural Mineral Water Sparkling brand water came after U.S. Food and Drug Administration testing found 500 to 600 micrograms of arsenic per liter — well above the 10-microgram limit, the agency announced. The water — which is bottled in and shipped from Jermuk, Armenia — was distributed nationwide through three firms, including Glendale-based Kradjian Importing Co., and was also labeled as "Bottled by Jermuk Group CJSC" and "Sale Agent Kradjian Importing Co. Inc.," according to the FDA. Kradjian Importing Co. was notified of the recall Tuesday and has since been working to collect about 200 cases of the bottled water from smaller stores in Glendale, Pasadena, Burbank and North Hollywood, co-owner Vic Kradjian said.
NEWS
February 3, 2001
Will Rogers A City Council majority approved testing bottled water sold at local retail outlets, and eventually received data that city staff and water experts politely assured them from the start would be utterly worthless. But the study overlooked one amazing quality of the water. The commercial supplies apparently had miraculous powers. The miracle performed was magically transforming a bill for $100 into a bill for $36,000. The bad news is that we paid the bill.
NEWS
September 13, 2000
David Silva What has Mike Antonovich been drinking? Well, a lot of bottled water, judging by his remarks in a Sept. 6 news release on the issue of pollutants in Glendale's drinking supply. For reasons fathomable only to the county supervisor, Antonovich felt the need to inform the public -- at the public's expense -- that bottled water was superior to Glendale tap water. Uh, yeah. Next he'll be telling us carrot juice is healthier than moonshine.
NEWS
September 8, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael Antonovich's questioning of the safety of Glendale's drinking water has city officials steamed and asking about his motivation. Antonovich, whose district includes Glendale, issued a statement late Wednesday stating that bottled water was superior to the city's tap water. Glendale's water containsaluminum, arsenic, barium, copper and lead and has higher levels of trihalomethanes and coliform bacteria than averages of 202 brands of bottled water tested by the county, Antonovich stated.
NEWS
May 14, 2005
Paradise Canyon hosts Medieval Faire All hail Paradise Canyon Elementary School's Medieval Faire today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The family event will begin with a Family Fun Run/Walk, a 5K race that begins at 8:30 a.m. Entry fees at the event are $20 for an individual and $50 for a family and include a newly designed Fun Run T-shirt, a bottled water and a mini smoothie from Juice It Up. First-, second- and third-place medals...
FEATURES
April 6, 2007
St. James the Less Catholic School had their annual Jog-A-Thon on Friday, March 23 on the school's upper field. The students were ready with their running clothes on and lap cards in hand. The lower grades launched the event, with kindergarten through fourth graders taking their turn around the lap. Next up at the course were the higher grades, fifth through eighth, and they enthusiastically took their place, ready to run for their school. The students took off in a flash, accompanied by upbeat tunes provided by fellow students and DJs Will Richards and Alex Garcia.
NEWS
By: | October 3, 2005
Bowling for Boobies The second annual Bowling for Boobies event will be held on Thursday at Lucky Strike Lanes, 6801 Hollywood Blvd., in Hollywood, to raise money for breast cancer awareness. The event, sponsored by Soroptimist International of the Verdugos, will run from 7 to 9 p.m., and anyone can participate. Those interested can join the Soroptimist team or build a team of their own. Registration is $15 per person, which includes shoes and bowling.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert, max.zimbert@latimes.com | September 27, 2010
GLENDALE — Legislators want more fresh water in schools, but they won't pay for it. They moved a bill to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger earlier this month that, if signed, requires schools to make fresh water more available to students before next summer. The bill's intent could be satisfied by providing disposable cups and pitchers of water, or bottled water to students during mealtimes. Advocates said making water more readily available would set children on a path for healthy habits throughout their lives, and help their learning and focus in the classroom.
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NEWS
By Max Zimbert, max.zimbert@latimes.com | September 27, 2010
GLENDALE — Legislators want more fresh water in schools, but they won't pay for it. They moved a bill to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger earlier this month that, if signed, requires schools to make fresh water more available to students before next summer. The bill's intent could be satisfied by providing disposable cups and pitchers of water, or bottled water to students during mealtimes. Advocates said making water more readily available would set children on a path for healthy habits throughout their lives, and help their learning and focus in the classroom.
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NEWS
July 16, 2010
Editor's Note: Numerous instances of plagiarism have been discovered in Dan Kimber's “Education Matters” column, which ran in the News- Press from September 2003 to September 2011. In those columns where plagiarism has been found, a For the Record specifying the details will be appended to the piece. A life-long love affair has officially and finally come to an end. A relationship based on a deep and unqualified affection that began back in 1955 when we were both young, and has lasted for about 40 years, is over - kaput.
FEATURES
October 27, 2009
Do you spend hard-earned dollars on bottled water, thinking it comes from some exotic distant location and must be safer than what comes from the tap? Don’t be fooled by pretty labels. Check the source of your next bottle of water. Many companies hope you will skip the fine print and be foolish enough to pay for a product containing essentially the same water that flows to Southern California from northern sources, and is delivered through the tap by our publicly subsidized, publicly regulated municipal water systems.
FEATURES
April 6, 2007
St. James the Less Catholic School had their annual Jog-A-Thon on Friday, March 23 on the school's upper field. The students were ready with their running clothes on and lap cards in hand. The lower grades launched the event, with kindergarten through fourth graders taking their turn around the lap. Next up at the course were the higher grades, fifth through eighth, and they enthusiastically took their place, ready to run for their school. The students took off in a flash, accompanied by upbeat tunes provided by fellow students and DJs Will Richards and Alex Garcia.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | March 27, 2007
GLENDALE — Health officials expanded a recall for Jermuk mineral water over the weekend after tests continued to reveal the water contained unacceptable levels of arsenic. A recall of Jermuk Natural Mineral Water Sparkling brand water was reissued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Saturday after testing continued to show arsenic levels of 454 to 674 micrograms per liter — up to 670 times the legal limit, the agency announced. The latest recall affects water distributed through Andreas Andreasyan DBA Arnaz & Nelli Co., based in North Hollywood.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | March 10, 2007
GLENDALE — About 2,400 bottles of Jermuk mineral water are being recalled from stores after they were found to contain unacceptable levels of arsenic. The order to recall Jermuk Natural Mineral Water Sparkling brand water came after U.S. Food and Drug Administration testing found 500 to 600 micrograms of arsenic per liter — well above the 10-microgram limit, the agency announced. The water — which is bottled in and shipped from Jermuk, Armenia — was distributed nationwide through three firms, including Glendale-based Kradjian Importing Co., and was also labeled as "Bottled by Jermuk Group CJSC" and "Sale Agent Kradjian Importing Co. Inc.," according to the FDA. Kradjian Importing Co. was notified of the recall Tuesday and has since been working to collect about 200 cases of the bottled water from smaller stores in Glendale, Pasadena, Burbank and North Hollywood, co-owner Vic Kradjian said.
FEATURES
December 23, 2006
S ome religious groups, such as the National Coalition of American Nuns, are calling for followers to refrain from drinking bottled water. They say a God-given resource such as water is not something to be packaged and sold while access to drinking water is so scarce in the poorest regions of the world. Water should be free for all, they say. Bottled-water advocates say targeting bottled-water companies is misguided, given the many products that use water, and will not lead to solutions to resource scarcity in poor regions of the world.
NEWS
By: | October 3, 2005
Bowling for Boobies The second annual Bowling for Boobies event will be held on Thursday at Lucky Strike Lanes, 6801 Hollywood Blvd., in Hollywood, to raise money for breast cancer awareness. The event, sponsored by Soroptimist International of the Verdugos, will run from 7 to 9 p.m., and anyone can participate. Those interested can join the Soroptimist team or build a team of their own. Registration is $15 per person, which includes shoes and bowling.
NEWS
May 14, 2005
Paradise Canyon hosts Medieval Faire All hail Paradise Canyon Elementary School's Medieval Faire today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The family event will begin with a Family Fun Run/Walk, a 5K race that begins at 8:30 a.m. Entry fees at the event are $20 for an individual and $50 for a family and include a newly designed Fun Run T-shirt, a bottled water and a mini smoothie from Juice It Up. First-, second- and third-place medals...
NEWS
February 3, 2001
Will Rogers A City Council majority approved testing bottled water sold at local retail outlets, and eventually received data that city staff and water experts politely assured them from the start would be utterly worthless. But the study overlooked one amazing quality of the water. The commercial supplies apparently had miraculous powers. The miracle performed was magically transforming a bill for $100 into a bill for $36,000. The bad news is that we paid the bill.
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