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NEWS
By: FLO MARTIN | September 9, 2005
TV or not TV? Public television, such as our own KOCE-TV, isn't worth the trouble, you say? The children's shows on public television are chock-full of ads, you say? We can find better viewing material on cable channels, such as the Discovery Channel, the History Channel, or A&E, you say? Seeing that the price of local cable services ranges from $50 to more than $110 a month, I seriously doubt that many folks, especially families with lots of kids, actually watch those channels.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 2, 2013
In January, 8-year-old Luke French will return to Lincoln Elementary after spending much of the past year recovering from cancer treatments that tested his strength and set him on a path toward recovery. In early December 2012, an MRI scan revealed two malignant tumors growing on Luke's brain. Weeks before the scan, Luke would unexpectedly throw up at school or at home, with the sudden illness taking hold of him as quickly as it seemed to leave, puzzling everyone around him. After hearing the diagnosis, Luke's parents were shocked.
FEATURES
January 20, 2010
Dan Kimber’s column, “Education Matters,” is always entertaining and thought-provoking. I’m responding to his recent column on golf because it is clearly one of the more difficult sports in which education doesn’t really matter. Dan described painfully the ups, downs, hooks, slices and divot-digging frustrations of the game. Author and humorist Mark Twain called golf, “a good walk, ruined.” As an educator, Dan, it may be helpful for you to analyze your golf game by observing it with both sides of your brain.
NEWS
September 21, 2002
Members of the "BrainWorks" team from the California Science Center's Science Theater on Tour got inside the heads of 672 students at Verdugo Woodlands Elementary School on Friday. The "BrainWorks" team put on a show for students in the school's cafeteria, using a life-sized replica of a human brain, skulls, vertebrae and diagrams of the brain to teach students about how the brain functions. The team, dressed in white lab coats, used humorous skits to explain scientific terms like sensory neurons, glial cells, cerebrum, cerebellum, sensory organs and the central nervous system to students in all grades.
FEATURES
By Natalie Yemenidjian | December 1, 2008
An ambulance’s siren blends in with the hustle and bustle of the city for most people — but not for Robert Coppel. It reminds Coppel of his job as a family care coordinator for OneLegacy, a nonprofit organ procurement organization. The longtime Burbank resident often spends hours in the hallways and waiting rooms of hospitals in Burbank and Glendale, supporting grieving families of potential organ donors with everything from information about donating to simply emotional support.
BUSINESS
By By Vince Lovato | January 23, 2006
New procedure designed to prevent strokes performed at the Glendale Adventist Medical Center on Friday.GLENDALE -- Dr. George Rappard successfully placed a stent in the brain of a patient Friday at Glendale Adventist Medical Center in a pioneering surgery designed to prevent a debilitating or deadly stroke. The 90-minute procedure was the first such operation in California and one of only 10 performed nationwide, said Rappard, the medical director of Glendale Adventist's neuroscience program.
NEWS
February 20, 2002
As the owner of Glendale's DUI school, and author of the book, "Find Your Perfect High" I was impressed with your Feb. 5 editorial on alcohol sales. Toughening the laws may help, but as long as there is demand, people will find supply. And Lord knows, there's demand. We're an interesting society. We accept alcohol as a way of life. We use it to relax, socialize, reduce stress, express our emotions and shed our inhibitions. About $2 billion in alcohol advertising convinces us that alcohol makes us outgoing, sexy and part of the crowd.
NEWS
November 8, 2000
Amber Willard GLENDALE -- A judge refused to dismiss charges Tuesday against Michael Demirdjian, accused of killing two teens in La Crescenta, despite claims of insufficient evidence by Demirdjian's attorney. After refusing to grant defense attorny Charles Mathew's request to dismiss the case, Glendale Judge Barbara Lee Burke ordered the 15-year-old La Crescenta boy to appear for another hearing on Nov. 22 in Pasadena Superior Court. "It shows that what Michael told police was true," Mathews said of what he called a lack of evidence against his client, who is charged with the slayings of Christopher McCulloch and Blaine Talmo Jr. on a school playground in July.
FEATURES
April 21, 2010
Regarding Dorothy Beck’s April 15 letter titled “Suspensions not proper punishment,” she asks if the school administration, parents or police can’t responsibly handle the alarming alcohol/drug problems in schools, who else can? The answer is — the students. Well-meaning coalitions formed to fight increasing substance abuse in our schools and communities have come and gone over the past 20 years, and the problem keeps getting worse. The question that needs to be asked is, “Why?
NEWS
January 14, 2002
Chuck Benedict "The diagnosis: You are in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. In time, you will lose touch with reality. Eventually, you will be unable ..." That prognosis is frightening. For victims and their families, it often makes the living future seem worse than death. Medical science is feverishly trying to learn the secret of tackling this brain malfunction. It is a hope not yet in sight. Meanwhile, the reverse of that brain pyramid is a real hope for those with anoxia, a condition in which the brain, through accident or illness, has suffered from the lack of oxygen, causing immediate impairment of some capabilities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | January 24, 2014
Local parents asked an expert for tips Thursday night on how to better guide their teens through the vulnerable years in which their brains are still developing. The years during which a teen's brain is developing are also the years when “teens need parents more than ever,” said Tina Givrad, who has a doctorate degree in biomedical engineering. She spoke during a program sponsored by the CV Alliance, a Crescenta Valley-based organization that provides resources to parents and teens about substance abuse.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 2, 2013
In January, 8-year-old Luke French will return to Lincoln Elementary after spending much of the past year recovering from cancer treatments that tested his strength and set him on a path toward recovery. In early December 2012, an MRI scan revealed two malignant tumors growing on Luke's brain. Weeks before the scan, Luke would unexpectedly throw up at school or at home, with the sudden illness taking hold of him as quickly as it seemed to leave, puzzling everyone around him. After hearing the diagnosis, Luke's parents were shocked.
NEWS
May 18, 2013
In the costliest and most vicious City Council race of the Los Angeles election season, the battle for Hollywood has shattered beliefs about Armenian solidarity, with Paul Krekorian's role seen as causing deep rifts in the community. Little Armenia in East Hollywood is a key battleground area where Krekorian's endorsement of labor union darling John Choi and the heavy-handed tactics that are being employed against Mitch O'Farrell, a popular council staffer, have enraged many local community leaders.
NEWS
January 7, 2012
One week into the New Year, that's seven days, or approximately 168 hours since the crystal ball dropped at Times Square, and I'll bet those lofty New Year's resolutions you so foolishly made already are under siege. But not me. I resolved this year not to make any resolutions. I've sailed through the first week of the year oblivious to the temptation to correct any faults or set any goals. Before deciding not to resolve anything in 2012, I did some research. There are hundreds of websites that expound on how to make and keep New Year's resolutions.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | November 17, 2011
For some left brain-thinking parents, communicating about the dos and don'ts of driving with their teens may require them to get a little more creative. John Marshall, founder of Right On Programs in Glendale, has launched a program to help parents and teens better communicate about the fundamentals of driving, including mental games and physical exercises, including Tai Chi. “It's a whole new way of understanding each other,” he said, adding that he hopes the free program will reduce the number of teen-involved collisions.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | June 27, 2011
Music was blasting from speakers hooked up to Mihran Kirakosyan’s laptop as kids ran laps around Matador Dance Studio, where the motto is, “You will never truly grow until you dance.” It was the beginning of Kirakosyan’s hip-hop class for kids ages 5 to 12. After they ran a few laps, Kirakosyan’s warm-up routine would have them stretch and complete reps of sit-ups, push-ups and jumping jacks. Then it was time to dance. With all their eyes on Kirakosyan, the kids followed his steps to his count with no music at all. “It’s simple counts, no counts in between, so they can put steps and choreography into music.
FEATURES
April 21, 2010
Regarding Dorothy Beck’s April 15 letter titled “Suspensions not proper punishment,” she asks if the school administration, parents or police can’t responsibly handle the alarming alcohol/drug problems in schools, who else can? The answer is — the students. Well-meaning coalitions formed to fight increasing substance abuse in our schools and communities have come and gone over the past 20 years, and the problem keeps getting worse. The question that needs to be asked is, “Why?
FEATURES
January 20, 2010
Dan Kimber’s column, “Education Matters,” is always entertaining and thought-provoking. I’m responding to his recent column on golf because it is clearly one of the more difficult sports in which education doesn’t really matter. Dan described painfully the ups, downs, hooks, slices and divot-digging frustrations of the game. Author and humorist Mark Twain called golf, “a good walk, ruined.” As an educator, Dan, it may be helpful for you to analyze your golf game by observing it with both sides of your brain.
NEWS
By Sharon Ragavachary | December 2, 2009
Thanksgiving offers a time for reflection, yet Christmastime always makes me look back and be thankful, too. My husband and I received the greatest gifts of all when our twins, Becky and Josh, were born after we tried for years to have children. Six years ago this month we brought our son and daughter home from the hospital. They were full-term, happy and healthy, and we were thrilled. When Josh was about 6 months old, his head grew very large very quickly. He had developed hydrocephalus, which is caused by a buildup of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | November 23, 2009
GLENDALE — Ten stroke patients were overexposed to radiation during CT scans at Glendale Adventist Medical Center this year, hospital officials said Monday. The patients received three to four times the normal dose of radiation during a triple-imaging brain exam using a General Electric-manufactured CT scan machine, hospital officials said. Risk to the patients due to the overexposure is minimal, hospital officials said. California Department of Public Health officials discovered the problem Tuesday while conducting an audit of CT scan protocols.
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