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Bridge Program

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NEWS
April 17, 2003
The sounds of a first-time drum lesson Wednesday at Hoover High School sounded like a herd of wild elephants stampeding through the school's auditorium. A quick lesson in dynamics led by professional musician Paul Angers also made the auditorium sound like a rain forest at dawn. About 20 Bridge Program students at Hoover High participated in a sort of "drum-circle" exercise with Angers, during a lesson designed to teach students the values of harmony, communication, team work, rhythm and diversity through music.
NEWS
June 16, 2000
Judy Seckler GLENDALE -- Roosevelt and Wilson Middle School faculty can give themselves a pat on the back for promoting most of their students to high school. At Roosevelt Middle School, 480 students will attend the promotion exercise scheduled at 9 a.m. today at the campus field, said Ron Grace, a Roosevelt guidance counselor. The school made the decision to retain 10 students. Those students, identified as having skills below grade level based on standards set by the state, were first identified in September 1998.
NEWS
March 30, 2002
Mirjam Swanson SOUTHEAST GLENDALE -- A man of his word, Jaiya Figueras teaches the students in his bridge program classes at Glendale High, and the student-athletes on the Nitro football team, to free their minds and to do what makes them happy. That's exactly what the 27-year-old is doing. "Be happy, no regrets, no hate, no jealousy, just give me a shot," said Figueras of his current pursuit of a professional football career. Figueras played football at Glendale before starring as a safety at the University of Oregon, and then, in 1999, he came one roster spot short of playing for the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 14, 2009
LA CRESCENTA — The Bridge Program that began last year at Crescenta Valley High School will most likely continue this fall, but with slightly less funding and personnel. The goal of the program is to help ninth- and 10th-grade boys who may have had a difficult transition from Rosemont Middle School, said Crescenta Valley Sheriff Deputy Scott Shinagawa. “It is really a program for kids who felt disconnected from school,” Shinagawa said. “They don’t join any clubs or sports and they can get lost in the system.
NEWS
May 20, 2002
Gary Moskowitz GLENDALE -- The school board will review its middle school accountability system at Tuesday's board meeting. District officials have proposed changes to the current credit system because many feel it is not encouraging middle school students to take higher-level math courses before entering high school. The current system -- started in 2000-01 -- requires 90 credits for promotion to high school, including 20 credits in math and 20 credits in English.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | May 10, 2008
Last year, Karla Acosta Díaz was working at a Glendale Starbucks four or five days a week while going to Glendale Community College full time. But this year, with the help of funds from a new scholarship program on campus, the 24-year-old has been able to scale back the number of hours she spends making coffee drinks, and concentrate on her math major. She received $1,500 in financial aid this year through her participation in the college’s Mathematics and Science Transfer, Excellence and Retention — or MASTER — scholarship program.
NEWS
May 6, 2000
Judy Seckler DOWNTOWN -- The school board got one step closer to approving stricter middle school graduation requirements. The Glendale Unified School District Board of Education on Tuesday discussed a district staff report recommending changes to the way middle school students are advanced to high school. The board will probably take action on the recommendations at its May 16 meeting. "I think it will make a difference, especially for the middle-of-road and lower-performing students who don't feel that there's any importance to why they're in school," board member Lina Harper said.
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NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 14, 2009
LA CRESCENTA — The Bridge Program that began last year at Crescenta Valley High School will most likely continue this fall, but with slightly less funding and personnel. The goal of the program is to help ninth- and 10th-grade boys who may have had a difficult transition from Rosemont Middle School, said Crescenta Valley Sheriff Deputy Scott Shinagawa. “It is really a program for kids who felt disconnected from school,” Shinagawa said. “They don’t join any clubs or sports and they can get lost in the system.
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NEWS
April 17, 2003
The sounds of a first-time drum lesson Wednesday at Hoover High School sounded like a herd of wild elephants stampeding through the school's auditorium. A quick lesson in dynamics led by professional musician Paul Angers also made the auditorium sound like a rain forest at dawn. About 20 Bridge Program students at Hoover High participated in a sort of "drum-circle" exercise with Angers, during a lesson designed to teach students the values of harmony, communication, team work, rhythm and diversity through music.
NEWS
March 30, 2002
Mirjam Swanson SOUTHEAST GLENDALE -- A man of his word, Jaiya Figueras teaches the students in his bridge program classes at Glendale High, and the student-athletes on the Nitro football team, to free their minds and to do what makes them happy. That's exactly what the 27-year-old is doing. "Be happy, no regrets, no hate, no jealousy, just give me a shot," said Figueras of his current pursuit of a professional football career. Figueras played football at Glendale before starring as a safety at the University of Oregon, and then, in 1999, he came one roster spot short of playing for the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League.
NEWS
June 16, 2000
Judy Seckler GLENDALE -- Roosevelt and Wilson Middle School faculty can give themselves a pat on the back for promoting most of their students to high school. At Roosevelt Middle School, 480 students will attend the promotion exercise scheduled at 9 a.m. today at the campus field, said Ron Grace, a Roosevelt guidance counselor. The school made the decision to retain 10 students. Those students, identified as having skills below grade level based on standards set by the state, were first identified in September 1998.
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