Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsBrown Act
IN THE NEWS

Brown Act

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By: Alicia Robinson | August 4, 2005
Costa Mesa's city attorney has rejected a resident's claim that city officials violated the Brown Act by participating in private meetings concerning the city's Job Center. Martin Millard, a Costa Mesa resident who has said the city shouldn't be running the Job Center, sent the complaint to City Attorney Kimberly Hall Barlow on July 12. It alleged that members of the City Council and city staff have worked with an independent committee but withheld information about their involvement and the committee's work.
NEWS
August 19, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum A Glendale resident has accused Mayor Bob Yousefian of violating the Brown Act and the 1st Amendment during the Aug. 10 City Council meeting by pushing the public comment period to the end of the meeting. Lila Ramirez filed a complaint with the city late Tuesday. Yousefian and other city officials insisted he did nothing wrong. Ramirez does not specifically ask for any remedies other than calling on the mayor to let the audience know at the beginning of the meeting if the public comment period will be delayed.
NEWS
October 10, 2002
Janine Marnien The Crescenta Valley Town looks like a governmental body. Its members, elected by the public they represent, gather information on local issues and listen to testimony from residents. It acts like a governmental body, making recommendations on current issues to Supervisor Michael Antonovich -- recommendations that sometimes result in legislation and policy changes. It even sounds like a governmental body, with members speaking authoritatively of parliamentary procedure and the Brown Act and other rules that govern legislative entities.
NEWS
By: Dave Brooks | October 6, 2005
The city attorney has asked county prosecutors to look into allegations that a Huntington Beach planning commissioner violated the state's open meetings law. Bob Dingwall allegedly e-mailed research on an upcoming Target store project to six other commissioners on the planning body before going through the legal communication channels, City Attorney Jennifer McGrath said. The Brown Act makes it illegal for a majority of a government body -- often referred to as a quorum -- to meet privately to discuss current issues.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
Journalists, the good government crowd, even some ordinary people who believe in democracy, felt triumphant last week when the farce in Sacramento over what they called the "gutting … neutering … eviscerating" of California's freedom of information law ended the way they had hoped. A victory for open government, for freedom, they said, proof that the politicians will respond to the public if people get aroused enough. Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature controlled by Democratic super-majorities that allow them to do anything they want with barely whimpers from the Republicans had backed down on making the state's public access law, the Ralph M. Brown Act, optional at the discretion of each and every government agency.
NEWS
March 7, 2002
La Canada Flintridge's policy concerning public comments at the end of public meetings violated the intent of the Brown Act and, specifically, Section 54954.3(a) thereof, regarding special meetings. However, the City Council never operated under the provisions of the resolution they intend to change. The proposed amended resolution will apparently be morally and legally in compliance with said act. Hopefully, the mayor will conduct future meetings in accordance with the amended policy and the public will get the opportunity to express themselves at a time certain (which they expressed a preference for two years ago in a city survey)
NEWS
April 17, 2003
City Hall broke the law and irreparably harmed residents by not informing the public of meetings on an amendment to Glendale's just-cause eviction ordinance, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office stated in a letter to the City Council. The letter also stated that City Atty. Scott Howard was less than forthcoming in his cooperation with the D.A.'s investigation of the matter, a charge Howard denied and to which he said he plans to respond.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | May 18, 2007
Residents of a Valderas Drive apartment complex in Montrose almost got a chance for direct negotiations with their new landlord at Tuesday's Glendale City Council meeting. David Seiler of StarPoint Properties spoke to the council during the public comment period, introducing his firm and its investment program in converting real estate property to high-end rentals. Seiler said the Beverly Hills firm purchased the Montrose property in March, and has been working on the site since then.
NEWS
June 27, 2003
Joshua Pelzer The city's "just-cause" eviction ordinance is destined for a third City Council review, pending amendment proposals by a rental-housing subcommittee. The subcommittee agreed at its meeting Thursday to propose expanding a provision that requires landlords to provide relocation assistance to tenants who have to vacate for building repairs. The proposal would be extended to include tenants who do not fall under the ordinance, but are required by the government to vacate an uninhabitable building due to landlord negligence.
NEWS
April 19, 2003
Joshua Pelzer City Atty. Scott Howard fired back this week at charges by the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office that he did not cooperate with the investigation of a group formed to deal with the city's just-cause eviction ordinance. Assistant Head Deputy D.A. Susan Chasworth wrote in an April 9 letter to the City Council that meetings to improve the ordinance were held without public notice in violation of the Brown Act, the state law governing local legislative bodies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 2013
Journalists, the good government crowd, even some ordinary people who believe in democracy, felt triumphant last week when the farce in Sacramento over what they called the "gutting … neutering … eviscerating" of California's freedom of information law ended the way they had hoped. A victory for open government, for freedom, they said, proof that the politicians will respond to the public if people get aroused enough. Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature controlled by Democratic super-majorities that allow them to do anything they want with barely whimpers from the Republicans had backed down on making the state's public access law, the Ralph M. Brown Act, optional at the discretion of each and every government agency.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | January 3, 2013
Board directors for the Montrose Shopping Park Assn. on Thursday voiced support for holding closed-door meetings, with proponents saying the open format discourages frank discussion about potentially uncomfortable topics. The group is a quasi-governmental association set up by the city decades ago, but members say they've gotten mixed messages about whether they have to follow state public-meeting laws. “It depends on who you talk to,” said Executive Director Dale Dawson, adding that for years the group has been following state rules just in case.
NEWS
February 26, 2012
The walls of L.A. County's Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration are so thick and shielding of public scrutiny that even the old-line Commies in charge of the Kremlin in Moscow would be envious. The city's newspapers have assigned teams of reporters over the years to try to break through those walls of secrecy, but they've rarely been able to learn much, apart from the complete failure of the county Department of Children Services and the horror-show of the public health system. The all-powerful county supervisors, given to boasting they have the best jobs in politics, once enforced a formal rule on county employees that made speaking to the press without prior approval of a supervisor grounds for dismissal.
THE818NOW
September 26, 2011
California Gov. Jerry Brown is scheduled to meet with Los Angeles County supervisors Monday afternoon in a closed session over a controversial plan to shift care of some parolees from state workers to county probation officers. The meeting will be held in closed session, according to the governor's official schedule, so the public will not hear the discussion. The state's Brown Act generally requires that local legislative bodies meet in the open so members of the public can attend and participate.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | July 15, 2011
CITY HALL - City Councilman Rafi Manoukian has demanded that closed door proceedings related to City Manager Jim Starbird be made public - claiming the council violated open meeting laws. Manoukian this week confirmed that on Sunday he sent an email to his fellow council members and the city attorney's office, alleging that the City Council had violated open meeting laws during a recent closed session deliberation. Under the Brown Act, legislative bodies are required to meet a slew of regulations and posting requirements intended to ensure that all deliberations and actions are reported to the public.
FEATURES
June 27, 2009
Public can’t read city staff’s minds Frank Quintero, since becoming mayor, has opted to limit public debate. Is he right? The other night, after all the speakers had spoken, Margaret Hammond and I said to the mayor that he had forgotten to let us speak. The mayor said we did not turn in our speaker cards as directed before the start of the agenda’s action items. He said we could come forward and speak this one time, but that in the future, he no longer wanted audience participation after all speaker cards had been turned in to the city clerk and before council discussion.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | August 29, 2008
Glendale City Council members are moving toward a consensus to create some kind of public forum to discuss police-community issues, though there appears to be little support for creating a new police commission. At least three council members seem ready to consider taking the police chief?s advisory committee and turning it into a public body, designed to hear from the public in open sessions. Exactly how this might be accomplished remains to be decided, as the CPAC, as it is called, reports to Chief Randy Adams and is not covered by the Brown Act. Adams said he was prepared to open the meetings to the public if a way can be found to meet legal issues.
FEATURES
August 7, 2008
Area means taking chances with nature In response to Christopher Glass’ letter concerning the coyote problem in the surrounding areas(“Coyotes can adapt to surroundings,” Mailbag, Friday). I love the idea of our tax-payer dollars being used for loud speakers throughout the hillsides to scare away the coyotes. Tell me, how many would be needed and at what cost? Why don’t, instead, you just adapt? We have come through the Ice Age, plagues, wars and yet we are still here, just as the coyotes.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | July 1, 2008
CITY HALL — Frequent City Council critic Barry Allen has filed a letter with the city demanding that Mayor John Drayman revisit the $775.3-million budget adopted on Tuesday and hear the 10 speakers who were disallowed from speaking before the vote. If the city fails to set aside the budget vote and reopen the public comment period within 30 days, Allen said donors to his organization, which is a registered nonprofit, would support a legal challenge in court. In the letter filed Thursday at City Hall, Allen alleges that the City Council violated open meeting laws set out in the Brown Act when Drayman decided to forgo further public comment on the proposed budget and call for the vote.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|