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By Mary O’Keefe | August 24, 2007
In their continuing effort to reach across faith lines, the Islamic Congregation of La Cañada Flintridge invited Michael Josephson to speak at last Friday?s potluck meeting. Josephson, who is known for his Character Counts commentaries on KNX radio is also founder of the Joseph and Edna Josephson Institute on Ethics, spoke to the audience of their common ethics. Members from all religious backgrounds including Jewish and Christian faiths joined the congregation at the Community Center of La Cañada Flintridge to share a meal and find common ground, said Levent Akbarut, of the Islamic Congregation.
NEWS
December 15, 2011
Strong communities are made up of strong, dedicated and visionary individuals, and one of those people here in Glendale has been Barry McComb with the Alex Theatre and Glendale Arts (“Glendale Arts chief to move on,” Dec. 15). As McComb moves on to Thousand Oaks for another chapter in his career, I wanted to stop for a moment and express our deepest gratitude to this very special person. I've had the privilege of working with Barry not only with Glendale Arts, but with the Glendale Educational Foundation in its formative years.
NEWS
By MICHAEL TEAHAN | September 30, 2009
Every community has challenges when it tries to bring different groups together. The celebration of ethnic diversity occurs only after years of reaching across cultural barriers. Glendale has taken many steps to build bridges between its different ethnicities and cultures, but our communities are much more varied than that. There are differences in social class, income, education and homeownership, and building bridges between them may be an incomplete solution. The thing about bridges is that we can cross over for a brief visit, share some coffee and conversation, but we will always cross back over to where we are most comfortable.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | December 12, 2009
Five seconds never felt so long. Had their triangle-shaped bridge buckled a moment sooner, Crescenta Valley High School’s engineering students would have lost first place. Three teams from CV High swept the awards Friday at Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Invention Challenge, a culmination of months of design, trial and error. The school bested teams from 20 Southern California schools. “We are extremely happy and proud,” engineering teacher Greg Neat said.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
Robert Chacon A local private school is planning to ship hundreds of used textbooks on a cargo container destined for a village in the southwestern region of Uganda. Their destination: a kindergarten through sixth-grade school in the village of Nyamirama. Crestview Preparatory School is joining a loose coalition of groups from as far away as Bakersfield that are sending aid to the impoverished region. The school's contribution is being spearheaded by third-grade teacher Judy Lehman and her husband, Burt.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | December 20, 2006
Holding candles in paper cups, a group of Latino students introduced themselves to an audience of Armenian seniors at the Salvation Army's Silvercrest senior residence Tuesday. "Imanuna Linda," 12-year-old Linda Perez said, which means "My name is Linda" in Armenian. More than 20 Roosevelt Middle School students visited seniors in the Silvercrest residence to sing them Christmas carols. "It's just a little thing we do make them happy," Linda said. Students quickly sang through five standard Christmas songs with musical accompaniment from a piano, clarinet and steel drum.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
For the first time since 2002, residents joined Glendale Police at Palmer Park Tuesday night for a renewed effort at the once-popular National Night Out. The event, which is billed as a way for police departments across the country to reach out to their respective communities, tripped from a string of successful nights in the late 90s due to lack of resources in the Police Department, Sgt. Ron Insalaco said. But since the City Council approved a spending increase for the Police Department in its bid to hire more officers, staffing levels have increased at least enough to staff the Night Out, he said.
NEWS
March 12, 2005
Josh Kleinbaum Anahid Oshagan doesn't have all the answers. She'll be the first to admit that. But she knows how to listen. Oshagan, one of 19 candidates for Glendale City Council, spent three years working for Rep. Adam Schiff, listening to constituents' problems and routing them to the appropriate person. She focused on Glendale and Armenian issues, getting a good feel for concerns and issues important to Glendale's residents in the process. Now, she looks at the City Council and sees a lack of interest.
NEWS
September 17, 2003
Josh Kleinbaum City Manager Jim Starbird does not know much about his upcoming trip to Armenia. He knows when he is leaving -- Oct. 2. He knows when he is coming back -- Oct. 11. But other details on the trip, well, Starbird will find out. "I don't even know who's going," Starbird said. "People are coming up to me on the street and saying, 'I'm going to Armenia with you.'" Starbird is one of 18 delegates to take the nine-day trip to Armenia, with stops scheduled in the country's capital of Yerevan, as well as Karabagh and Ghapan, Glendale's sister city.
NEWS
By PATRICK AZADIAN | March 31, 2007
Driving up Brand Boulevard to my office, the view has been quite nice. Guarded by the tall, skinny palm trees on both sides and concluding at the scenic hills up above, the jewel street of the Jewel City is as sparkling as I've ever seen it. There have been no signs of crazy March weather so far, and the blue skies have been watching over us for the better part of this month. As the cars pass by and the efficient Glendale Beeline does its work transporting residents, I am caught with the thought that we do really live in a nice place.
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By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 4, 2012
The Glendale City Council this week unanimously approved spending $800,000 on two bridges, one of which will connect the Glendale Narrows Riverwalk to the other side of the Los Angeles River and an expanse of parkland there. The riverwalk has been discussed for more than a decade and is part of a larger effort to beautify and restore the Los Angeles River for recreational use. Its components range from equestrian amenities to bike and pedestrian paths. About $1.7 million in construction work for the first phase of the project, from Bette Davis Park on Paula Avenue to the edge of DreamWorks Animation near Flower Street, is already underway.
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NEWS
December 15, 2011
Strong communities are made up of strong, dedicated and visionary individuals, and one of those people here in Glendale has been Barry McComb with the Alex Theatre and Glendale Arts (“Glendale Arts chief to move on,” Dec. 15). As McComb moves on to Thousand Oaks for another chapter in his career, I wanted to stop for a moment and express our deepest gratitude to this very special person. I've had the privilege of working with Barry not only with Glendale Arts, but with the Glendale Educational Foundation in its formative years.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | July 10, 2010
CITY HALL — Glendale could eventually be connected to Griffith Park like never before, according to recently released design concepts for a pedestrian bridge over the Glendale State (5) Freeway that range from $2 million to $30 million. The City Council will consider design options for the proposed pedestrian bridge in coming the months to help parks officials secure grant funding for the project. The bridge is planned as a later phase of the long-awaited Glendale Narrows Riverwalk along the the Los Angeles River, which is set to break ground this summer after years of trying to secure funding and rights-of-way.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | December 12, 2009
Five seconds never felt so long. Had their triangle-shaped bridge buckled a moment sooner, Crescenta Valley High School’s engineering students would have lost first place. Three teams from CV High swept the awards Friday at Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Invention Challenge, a culmination of months of design, trial and error. The school bested teams from 20 Southern California schools. “We are extremely happy and proud,” engineering teacher Greg Neat said.
NEWS
By MICHAEL TEAHAN | September 30, 2009
Every community has challenges when it tries to bring different groups together. The celebration of ethnic diversity occurs only after years of reaching across cultural barriers. Glendale has taken many steps to build bridges between its different ethnicities and cultures, but our communities are much more varied than that. There are differences in social class, income, education and homeownership, and building bridges between them may be an incomplete solution. The thing about bridges is that we can cross over for a brief visit, share some coffee and conversation, but we will always cross back over to where we are most comfortable.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | April 28, 2009
Lilit Abgaryan wasn’t an expert on building bridges, but she had a plan for conquering her latest physics project. Clark Magnet High School physics teacher Gerald Gruss had challenged students to put together model bridges that would be evaluated based on the amount of weight they could support. The bridges had to be constructed out of only simple adhesives and small pieces of wood resembling toothpicks, which were provided by Gruss. Lilit, 17, got input from a friend about the best approach to putting together a model bridge and decided to use arc-shaped supports in a design that resembled a suspension bridge.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | May 29, 2008
The lab table in Gerald Gruss’ classroom at Clark Magnet High School was covered with bits of wood that were the casualties of Wednesday’s testing of student-constructed model bridges. Throughout the day, students who opted to participate in Gruss’ extra-credit, bridge-building assignment walked in with small bridges that they had constructed out of basswood. They then watched as their models snapped and crackled as increasing amounts of weight were hung from them.
FEATURES
By Mary O’Keefe | August 24, 2007
In their continuing effort to reach across faith lines, the Islamic Congregation of La Cañada Flintridge invited Michael Josephson to speak at last Friday?s potluck meeting. Josephson, who is known for his Character Counts commentaries on KNX radio is also founder of the Joseph and Edna Josephson Institute on Ethics, spoke to the audience of their common ethics. Members from all religious backgrounds including Jewish and Christian faiths joined the congregation at the Community Center of La Cañada Flintridge to share a meal and find common ground, said Levent Akbarut, of the Islamic Congregation.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
For the first time since 2002, residents joined Glendale Police at Palmer Park Tuesday night for a renewed effort at the once-popular National Night Out. The event, which is billed as a way for police departments across the country to reach out to their respective communities, tripped from a string of successful nights in the late 90s due to lack of resources in the Police Department, Sgt. Ron Insalaco said. But since the City Council approved a spending increase for the Police Department in its bid to hire more officers, staffing levels have increased at least enough to staff the Night Out, he said.
NEWS
By PATRICK AZADIAN | March 31, 2007
Driving up Brand Boulevard to my office, the view has been quite nice. Guarded by the tall, skinny palm trees on both sides and concluding at the scenic hills up above, the jewel street of the Jewel City is as sparkling as I've ever seen it. There have been no signs of crazy March weather so far, and the blue skies have been watching over us for the better part of this month. As the cars pass by and the efficient Glendale Beeline does its work transporting residents, I am caught with the thought that we do really live in a nice place.
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