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NEWS
April 26, 2003
Joshua Pelzer Despite facing a possible $10-million budget deficit, the city will have to come up with at least that much for employee retirement funds due to investment losses by the state. Glendale's contributions could exceed $20 million in the next 10 years, according to a budget forecast. "It's going to create significant challenges and burdens to the budget in the coming years," City Manager Jim Starbird said at a budget session Tuesday.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | July 28, 2010
Glendale has joined two other cities in trying to block what could be hundreds of thousands of dollars in additional pension payments for Randy Adams, whose lucrative stint as police chief of Bell continues to have far-reaching consequences via the state's complicated employee retirement system. Adams, who worked for the police departments in Simi Valley and Ventura before coming to Glendale, was forced to step down last week as police chief of Bell amid growing outcry over his $457,000 salary in a relatively poor city of about 40,000 people.
NEWS
The Los Angeles Times | August 11, 2011
Former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams will continue receiving generous retirement benefits even after CalPERS slashed the amount by more than $100,000. Adams, whose $457,000 salary was higher than Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck's and more than double his salary when he was Glendale's chief, will receive a pension of $287,066, according to documents obtained by The Times under the California Public Records Act. That's down considerably from the $411,300 he was expecting to receive.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 19, 2013
Glendale officials warned this week that planned changes to how the state's pension agency calculates contribution rates will have a significant impact on a city still recovering from a prolonged recession. The California Public Employees' Retirement System this week approved a proposal to increase how much cities pay for their benefit plans starting in 2015. The plan is part of an effort to fully fund the system in 30 years. Median contribution rates for public safety and miscellaneous personnel could jump by 34% and 36%, respectively, over 10 years, according to CalPERS.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 11, 2013
Former Glendale Police Capt. Ray Edey is not one to relax, so when he had the opportunity to return to writing grant applications for the city in September 2011, about a week after he retired, he took it. "I don't golf, fish or hunt," said the 30-year employee. "I need to keep my mind busy. " In addition to more work, he also reaped more money. He took home both an annual pension of $198,386 and a self-reported salary of roughly $80,000 a year until about four months ago. Edey is one of 46 city employees who, since 2000, retired and then returned to work at City Hall, according to an analysis of records from Glendale and California Public Employees' Retirement System, or CalPERS.
NEWS
June 25, 2003
Joshua Pelzer The city was on the brink of a final budget late Tuesday night as the City Council worked to set its fiscal future for the next year a week before its deadline. "There will probably be a certain level of discussion that will go over the high points in the budget and on the state impacts, and how those are going to have long-term implications on the city," Assistant City Manager Bob McFall said. "Since we've already gone through all the different parts of the budget with the council, I would imagine that they would consider approving it [Tuesday]
NEWS
July 15, 2003
Joshua Pelzer Two urgency ordinances that would raise the pay and benefits for public-safety personnel and general city staff will go before the City Council tonight. The adjustments compensate for cost-of-living increases stipulated in four-year contract agreements with employee associations, and were incorporated into this year's city budget. The council must pass an ordinance before changes can be implemented. The urgency ordinances allow the council's action to take effect seven days after adoption, rather than the 30 days required for a regular ordinance.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 8, 2013
Glendale officials say they expect the city to end the fiscal year next month $3.9 million in the black - money that could be used to shore up worker compensation and other funds that are in severe need of replenishment. In addition to the surplus for this year, officials this week said they are forecasting a $1 million to $2 million budget gap for fiscal year 2013-14, a far cry from the huge gaps in years past. While the bulk of the surplus could go to bolster so-called internal service funds - workers compensation alone had a $17.7-million deficit as of last June - the council could also use the money to close the smaller projected budget gap, officials said.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 11, 2013
As Glendale struggles to get a handle on its growing pension obligations, records show that about 11% of the nearly 1,350 city retirees draw annual pensions of more than $100,000 a year - and some of them far more than that. At the top of the list is former City Manager Jim Starbird, who draws $238,686, followed by ex-Fire Chief Christopher Gray at $200,783 and former Police Capt. Ray Edey at $198,386. But the sticker shock of high earners doesn't tell the whole story, pension experts said.
FEATURES
By By Herbert Molano | December 9, 2005
There is wisdom in nature, in that our usefulness will eventually diminish and our time comes to an end. The natural order of things eventually leads to death and birth. In that process, others can lead whose vigor and idealism can drive our world into a better future. That said, try convincing a local politician of that ideal when they aim to stay in office long after their useful years have sputtered and waned into a defensive intolerance. The idea of giving up a powerful office was renewed by George Washington.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2014
Our City Council likes to brag how we are spending millions of dollars on parkland services. But, nearly 90% of the parkland money comes from grants by the county, state or federal government. Thus, only 10% comes from the city's General Fund. With over 63% of the city's budget going for just the police and fire union employees for their salaries and pension benefits plus about 84% of our pension obligations being unfunded, our council will continue to count on using grant money to fund essential needed city services.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 11, 2013
As Glendale struggles to get a handle on its growing pension obligations, records show that about 11% of the nearly 1,350 city retirees draw annual pensions of more than $100,000 a year - and some of them far more than that. At the top of the list is former City Manager Jim Starbird, who draws $238,686, followed by ex-Fire Chief Christopher Gray at $200,783 and former Police Capt. Ray Edey at $198,386. But the sticker shock of high earners doesn't tell the whole story, pension experts said.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 11, 2013
Former Glendale Police Capt. Ray Edey is not one to relax, so when he had the opportunity to return to writing grant applications for the city in September 2011, about a week after he retired, he took it. "I don't golf, fish or hunt," said the 30-year employee. "I need to keep my mind busy. " In addition to more work, he also reaped more money. He took home both an annual pension of $198,386 and a self-reported salary of roughly $80,000 a year until about four months ago. Edey is one of 46 city employees who, since 2000, retired and then returned to work at City Hall, according to an analysis of records from Glendale and California Public Employees' Retirement System, or CalPERS.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 8, 2013
Glendale officials say they expect the city to end the fiscal year next month $3.9 million in the black - money that could be used to shore up worker compensation and other funds that are in severe need of replenishment. In addition to the surplus for this year, officials this week said they are forecasting a $1 million to $2 million budget gap for fiscal year 2013-14, a far cry from the huge gaps in years past. While the bulk of the surplus could go to bolster so-called internal service funds - workers compensation alone had a $17.7-million deficit as of last June - the council could also use the money to close the smaller projected budget gap, officials said.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 19, 2013
Glendale officials warned this week that planned changes to how the state's pension agency calculates contribution rates will have a significant impact on a city still recovering from a prolonged recession. The California Public Employees' Retirement System this week approved a proposal to increase how much cities pay for their benefit plans starting in 2015. The plan is part of an effort to fully fund the system in 30 years. Median contribution rates for public safety and miscellaneous personnel could jump by 34% and 36%, respectively, over 10 years, according to CalPERS.
NEWS
The Los Angeles Times | August 11, 2011
Former Bell Police Chief Randy Adams will continue receiving generous retirement benefits even after CalPERS slashed the amount by more than $100,000. Adams, whose $457,000 salary was higher than Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck's and more than double his salary when he was Glendale's chief, will receive a pension of $287,066, according to documents obtained by The Times under the California Public Records Act. That's down considerably from the $411,300 he was expecting to receive.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | May 17, 2011
CITY HALL — As negotiations with city employee unions get underway, the city’s top pension advisor has warned that Glendale’s skyrocketing tab for retirement benefits could remain high for years. Public safety employees who had retired in the past five years as of 2001 received an average of $35,400 annually for their years working in Glendale, according to a report by John Bartel, an actuary who advises more than 100 cities throughout the state. By 2009, the average had jumped to $78,400.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | July 28, 2010
Glendale has joined two other cities in trying to block what could be hundreds of thousands of dollars in additional pension payments for Randy Adams, whose lucrative stint as police chief of Bell continues to have far-reaching consequences via the state's complicated employee retirement system. Adams, who worked for the police departments in Simi Valley and Ventura before coming to Glendale, was forced to step down last week as police chief of Bell amid growing outcry over his $457,000 salary in a relatively poor city of about 40,000 people.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | April 23, 2010
Glendale’s contribution to employee pension plans in 2001: zero. The city’s check in 2009: $22.6 million. The growing burden of the California Public Employees Retirement System on Glendale’s bottom line in the last decade has been steep, and city officials are asking employees to pay a larger share of the costs. In addition to increased contributions from current employees, city officials are proposing a two-tier retirement system with scaled-back benefits for all new hires.
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