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THE626NOW
September 27, 2011
Jacqueline K. Barton, a chemistry professor at Caltech, has been awarded the prestigious National Medal of Science, becoming the first woman at the Pasadena campus to receive what is considered the federal government's highest honor to scientists. According to an announcement Tuesday, the White House cited Barton for her discovery of a new property of the DNA helix and her experiments about long-range electron transfers in DNA. She has built electrical sensors capable of detecting DNA mutations and proteins that can distort DNA, experiments that may aid research in such diseases as colon and breast cancer, officials said.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012
Congratulations are in order this week, as several local athletes throughout the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys--from the professionals right down to the high schoolers--achieved major milestones or received league honors. Let's start with the Glendale Fighting Club's mixed martial arts superstar Ronda Rousey, who made history last month when she became the first female fighter to sign with the UFC . This past Saturday, the league officially announced that Rousey's octagon debut will take place on Feb. 23 in Anaheim against Liz Carmouche at UFC 157 . According to Josh Gross , MMA columnist for ESPN.com, the UFC had delayed adding women to its ranks because of concerns over the depth of the talent pool.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | October 4, 2010
Hundreds of girls were run over by a space vehicle Sunday in Pasadena, but most came away smiling. "It tickles, but it feels really cool," said Meghan Gay of La Cañada Flintridge. "It went over my legs easy. I imagine it would go over Mars easily. " Gay and other members of Troop 736 volunteered to let an imitation of Mars rover — a nimble eight-wheeled vehicle about the size of a double-wide skateboard — clamber over them over during the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles Family Science Festival at Caltech.
NEWS
January 15, 2002
Karen S. Kim GLENDALE -- Congressional Science Scholar Forum, presented by Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) in conjunction with Caltech, will air on Charter Communications' public access channels for the rest of the month. The show, which presents quarterly presentations by researchers and professors from Caltech on various science topics, is targeted toward high school and college students. The forum will air on Charter Communications Channel 56 at 5 p.m. Thursday, 5 p.m. Tuesday and 6 p.m. Jan. 30. Charter Communications Channel 25 will also air the forum at 6 p.m. Jan. 24, 9 p.m. Jan. 26 and 8 p.m. Jan. 28.
NEWS
March 21, 2002
Karen S. Kim GLENDALE -- Charter Communications will continue to show the Congressional Science Scholar Forum, presented by Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) and Caltech, through the rest of the month on Channel 25. The forum, called "The Future of Chemistry: Fuel from Sunlight and Water," is the second in a series of quarterly presentations by researchers and professors from Caltech on different science topics. Charter will record and air the lectures for the 2001-02 academic year.
NEWS
November 28, 2002
Janine Marnien The California Institute of Technology has a new five-year contract with an estimated worth of more than $8 billion to continue managing Jet Propulsion Laboratory. NASA awarded Caltech the contract Tuesday, continuing a significant relationship between the three agencies, said Albert Horvath, vice president for business and finance at Caltech. "From our perspective, there's a historical sense of ownership and pride toward JPL," he said.
THE818NOW
By Katie Landan, katie.landan@latimes.com | September 9, 2011
Are you a cat person or a dog person? Or are you just not an animal person? According to a recent CalTech study , our brains are hardwired to react to creatures of the nonhuman kind. CalTech and UCLA researchers found that neurons throughout the brain's center for processing emotions (amygdala) respond preferentially to images of animals. "Our study shows that neurons in the human amygdala respond preferentially to pictures of animals, meaning that we saw the most amount of activity in cells when the patients looked at cats or snakes versus buildings or people," Florian Mormann, lead author on the paper and a former postdoctoral scholar in the Division of Biology at Caltech, said in a press release.
NEWS
March 17, 2004
Robert Chacon William Pickering, the director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from 1954 to 1976 and a central figure in U.S. space exploration, has died. He was 93. Pickering died Monday of pneumonia at his home in La Canada Flintridge, JPL officials said. JPL officials called Pickering a visionary and a titan of the U.S. space program. In 1958, he led the effort to place the first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, into orbit around the earth. It was considered one of his greatest achievements and laid the groundwork for future robotic exploration of the moon and planets.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2006
Money management seminar upcoming David Levy, director of financial aid at Caltech, will present a money-management seminar for college-bound high-school students and their parents from 7 to 8:30 p.m. July 31 in fourth-floor conference rooms B and D at Verdugo Hills Hospital, 1812 Verdugo Boulevard. The event is free and is sponsored by the hospital's foundation and the Caltech Employees Federal Credit Union. For more information and to reserve a spot, call (818) 952-2226.
COMMUNITY
October 9, 2013
Virginia Black Purves, age 88, passed away peacefully in her Flintridge home on September 6th followed by her husband Robert Renton Purves, age 89, who passed the following day. They are survived by Lauren Purves Zaun, her husband Todd, and their children Brooke, Dane and Kelly; son John Renton Purves, his wife Lynette and daughters Sarah and Emma. Both Robert and Virginia were born in Los Angeles and lived in Flintridge for 58 years. Bob and Virginia were graduates of U.S.C. where they met. During WWII Virginia worked at Lockheed as an Engineering Draftsperson and for a brief time she also taught elementary school in Burbank.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Gordon and Monte Morin | October 24, 2013
Thomas Rosenbaum, an expert in condensed matter physics, will become the new president of the California Institute of Technology, officials announced Thursday. Rosenbaum, 58, currently serves as provost at the University of Chicago, where he also holds the position of John T. Wilson Distinguished Service Professor of Physics. He succeeds Jean-Lou Chameau, who left Caltech earlier this year to head King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia. Before becoming Chicago's provost in 2007, Rosenbaum studied the behavior of closely-packed atoms in solids and liquids at the university's Rosenbaum Lab. By experimenting on materials in extreme cold -- temperatures that approached absolute zero -- Rosenbaum and his colleagues were better able to examine the quantum behavior of substances, the Los Angeles Times reported.
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COMMUNITY
October 9, 2013
Virginia Black Purves, age 88, passed away peacefully in her Flintridge home on September 6th followed by her husband Robert Renton Purves, age 89, who passed the following day. They are survived by Lauren Purves Zaun, her husband Todd, and their children Brooke, Dane and Kelly; son John Renton Purves, his wife Lynette and daughters Sarah and Emma. Both Robert and Virginia were born in Los Angeles and lived in Flintridge for 58 years. Bob and Virginia were graduates of U.S.C. where they met. During WWII Virginia worked at Lockheed as an Engineering Draftsperson and for a brief time she also taught elementary school in Burbank.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | January 18, 2013
The car-sized rover Curiosity had a clean landing on Mars five months ago. But planetary missions didn't always run so smoothly at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Mariner 3, a probe sent to do a first-ever flyby in 1964, failed to get to the Red Planet during a stressful time at the space agency. Engineers were under intense pressure to beat Russia in the space race. Another spacecraft launched three weeks later, Mariner 4, eventually made it to Mars. It returned the first grainy close-up images of a foreign terrain.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012
Congratulations are in order this week, as several local athletes throughout the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys--from the professionals right down to the high schoolers--achieved major milestones or received league honors. Let's start with the Glendale Fighting Club's mixed martial arts superstar Ronda Rousey, who made history last month when she became the first female fighter to sign with the UFC . This past Saturday, the league officially announced that Rousey's octagon debut will take place on Feb. 23 in Anaheim against Liz Carmouche at UFC 157 . According to Josh Gross , MMA columnist for ESPN.com, the UFC had delayed adding women to its ranks because of concerns over the depth of the talent pool.
THE626NOW
September 27, 2011
Jacqueline K. Barton, a chemistry professor at Caltech, has been awarded the prestigious National Medal of Science, becoming the first woman at the Pasadena campus to receive what is considered the federal government's highest honor to scientists. According to an announcement Tuesday, the White House cited Barton for her discovery of a new property of the DNA helix and her experiments about long-range electron transfers in DNA. She has built electrical sensors capable of detecting DNA mutations and proteins that can distort DNA, experiments that may aid research in such diseases as colon and breast cancer, officials said.
THE818NOW
By Katie Landan, katie.landan@latimes.com | September 9, 2011
Are you a cat person or a dog person? Or are you just not an animal person? According to a recent CalTech study , our brains are hardwired to react to creatures of the nonhuman kind. CalTech and UCLA researchers found that neurons throughout the brain's center for processing emotions (amygdala) respond preferentially to images of animals. "Our study shows that neurons in the human amygdala respond preferentially to pictures of animals, meaning that we saw the most amount of activity in cells when the patients looked at cats or snakes versus buildings or people," Florian Mormann, lead author on the paper and a former postdoctoral scholar in the Division of Biology at Caltech, said in a press release.
SPORTS
By Andrew Campa, andrew.campa@latimes.com | September 6, 2011
PASADENA — The Caltech University women's volleyball team's bid to open the season on a winning note came up a bit short Tuesday evening, as the host Beavers fell to Pacific Union, 23-25, 25-21, 25-10, 25-12 at the Braun Athletic Center. "Even though we lost, I was really proud of the effort," Beavers second-year coach Jodi Lindsay said. "We played well, but we also played with some first-game jitters that won't be there next time. " The match's turning point appeared to take place in the second game.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | October 4, 2010
Hundreds of girls were run over by a space vehicle Sunday in Pasadena, but most came away smiling. "It tickles, but it feels really cool," said Meghan Gay of La Cañada Flintridge. "It went over my legs easy. I imagine it would go over Mars easily. " Gay and other members of Troop 736 volunteered to let an imitation of Mars rover — a nimble eight-wheeled vehicle about the size of a double-wide skateboard — clamber over them over during the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles Family Science Festival at Caltech.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charly Shelton | April 18, 2008
O I am next to useless when it comes to physics. Give me any other subject and I can at least do a little something with it, but physics is just one of those things that does not compute in my brain. A couple of friends were with me that night for the lecture — the one who invited me, initially hearing about it from a Pasadena Community College math teacher, and the other, who has studied astronomy and cosmology. I study paleontology and religions, so I felt significantly inferior in this intellectual community of my peers.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | March 21, 2008
?Profound silence? is how Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist Bob Nelson described the response he and fellow scientists received from local and federal politicians when they were contacted about ?invasive? background checks. Nelson is one of 28 JPL employees who brought a lawsuit against NASA/Caltech for what they claim is a violation of constitutional rights. Nelson spoke to members of the La Cañada Flintridge Democrat Club on Sunday, March 16, along with fellow JPL employee Susan Paradise.
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