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Campaign Finance Reform

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NEWS
By Jason Wells | May 26, 2008
CITY HALL — Glendale voters may have the ultimate say over campaign finance reform after several on the City Council indicated they would prefer to put the issue on the ballot. The city attorney’s office is scheduled to present a report on possible campaign finance restrictions to the council on Tuesday after months of delays to accommodate a public outreach and education effort. Putting campaign finance reform on the ballot would eliminate the perception that the three incumbents for 2009, who have already started refilling their re-election coffers, are closing the fundraising door behind them as potential challengers still consider entering the race, City Council members said.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | July 21, 2008
CITY HALL — The introduction of donor limits to Glendale’s election campaigns, which in recent years have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars, could come swiftly Tuesday when the City Council takes up the long-awaited proposal. The proposed $1,000 contribution limit for individuals, corporations and labor unions to any one candidate would be a significant marker in Glendale’s political history, which so far has had no limit on the amount of money that campaigns can rake in. Lack of money controls has led to races where campaign coffers have exceeded $100,000.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
Claudia Peschiutta GLENDALE -- Fresh from a race that attracted hundreds of thousands of dollars in "soft money" contributions, U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) is working to change the system that helped get him into office. The Glendale congressman announced Tuesday he had started a drive to get fellow freshman legislators to support a campaign-finance reform measure authored by Reps. Christopher Shays (R-Conn.) and Marty Meehan (D-Mass.). "It seemed like an appropriate opportunity to get the freshman class on board ... and say, 'We're new to the process.
NEWS
February 3, 2001
Adam Schiff deserves high praise for starting a drive among his fellow freshman representatives in Congress to support the Shays-Meehan legislation to ban "soft money" political contributions ("Schiff fuels campaign-finance reform," Jan. 24). Sen. John McCain is leading the way to get the companion legislation (the McCain-Feingold bill) passed in the Senate, and the recent support expressed by Sen. Thad Cochran -- a Republican from Mississippi -- shows the momentum growing for this legislation.
NEWS
January 19, 2008
Former councilman likely behind letters A recent letter to the editor regarding the need for campaign finance reform (?Watch for campaign finance reform, too,? Mailbag, Jan. 4) citing former Mayor Rafi Manoukian?s accepting large campaign donations from an applicant for a zone change has generated a number of letters in response attacking Councilman Frank Quintero. It does not take a genius, I think, to see the hand of Manoukian behind these letters. Today?s letter from Michael Kiamen (?
LOCAL
By Laurie Collins | September 2, 2009
Briefly stated, the intent of campaign finance reform is to both level the playing field for non-incumbent candidates and to address pay-to-play. The ordinance provides that contributions not spent during the campaign cannot be carried over to the incumbent’s next campaign. The ordinance as presented to and discussed by the public last year allowed for only $5,000 in excess contributions to be retained by a council member. This was one of the conditions required to get the ordinance passed.
NEWS
January 4, 2001
Alex Coolman WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) was sworn in as the the representative of the 27th Congressional District Wednesday, and he moved quickly to make his first announcement as a member of the House. Schiff immediately pledged his support for the Shays-Meehan/McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform bill that would ban soft money donations to federal campaigns. The fast start was in keeping with an energetic spirit that Schiff said he finds to be common with the new crop of legislators.
NEWS
March 20, 2002
Adam B. Schiff Just when we thought nothing positive could possibly emerge from the Enron debacle, something has -- campaign finance reform will finally find its way past vociferous House and Senate opposition and onto the president's desk. This week, the Senate will take up historic campaign finance reform legislation when McCain-Feingold is brought to the floor. Although the opposition threatens a filibuster, this looks increasingly improbable of success, a sad but potent reminder of the continuing impact of the Enron scandal and perhaps the only positive impact of the corporate collapse.
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NEWS
By Ron Kaye | August 5, 2011
“Money is the mother's milk of politics.” - Jesse “Big Daddy” Unruh, California Assembly Speaker, 1966. With staggering sums from special interests pouring into campaigns for office at all levels, it's become perfectly clear that political money is toxic, corrupting our democratic institutions instead of nourishing them. What we see in the disconnect from our lives in the nonsense in Washington and Sacramento is repeated at the local level all too often. The corrosive effect of money from big business and big unions has produced a political machine in Los Angeles that makes it almost impossible for ordinary citizens to compete for elective office, for the will of the people to be heard except in extraordinary circumstances.
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LOCAL
By Laurie Collins | September 2, 2009
Briefly stated, the intent of campaign finance reform is to both level the playing field for non-incumbent candidates and to address pay-to-play. The ordinance provides that contributions not spent during the campaign cannot be carried over to the incumbent’s next campaign. The ordinance as presented to and discussed by the public last year allowed for only $5,000 in excess contributions to be retained by a council member. This was one of the conditions required to get the ordinance passed.
FEATURES
September 1, 2009
The Glendale News-Press Saturday editorial, “Campaign Changes Needed,” confuses two separate issues. If elected officials feel that they are not adequately compensated for their conduct of city business, that is a question that ought to be addressed by the city and the public. But adequate compensation of our elected representatives for expenses incurred in the discharge of their official duties has nothing to do with campaign contribution limits. The question is what council members do with money given to them after they are elected.
FEATURES
August 20, 2009
Regarding the Aug. 20 Glendale News-Press article “Officials to vote on use of campaign funds” — Hey, Laura! What you City Council members should do is to form a union, “Local Elected Officials Union.” The LEOU could then negotiate a contract, much like the firefighter’s union has historically gotten for its members, that would not only increase your salary, but provide perks such as a car and driver for the chief. Just think, you could go to all those public events in style.
NEWS
February 4, 2009
Zarian to ask city clerk about elections City Clerk Ardy Kassakhian is scheduled to appear live on ?The Larry Zarian Show? Thursday to discuss the upcoming April 7 citywide elections in which residents will vote for six education posts and five seats at City Hall, including three on the City Council. Kassakhian will go over the mechanics of holding a citywide election and explain new changes to the electoral system, including a new absentee ballot application process and campaign finance reform.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | July 21, 2008
CITY HALL — The introduction of donor limits to Glendale’s election campaigns, which in recent years have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars, could come swiftly Tuesday when the City Council takes up the long-awaited proposal. The proposed $1,000 contribution limit for individuals, corporations and labor unions to any one candidate would be a significant marker in Glendale’s political history, which so far has had no limit on the amount of money that campaigns can rake in. Lack of money controls has led to races where campaign coffers have exceeded $100,000.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | May 28, 2008
CITY HALL — Permanent campaign finance reform appears headed to the 2009 ballot after the City Council on Tuesday nudged a possible ordinance closer to formation. “The playing field is not level, and I don’t know how you’re going to get it down to level,” Councilman Dave Weaver said. By the end of Tuesday’s meeting, a clearer picture formed of what a campaign finance reform package for the April 2009 ballot might look like, after several on the council voiced support for an across-the-board donor limit of between $250 and $1,000.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | May 26, 2008
CITY HALL — Glendale voters may have the ultimate say over campaign finance reform after several on the City Council indicated they would prefer to put the issue on the ballot. The city attorney’s office is scheduled to present a report on possible campaign finance restrictions to the council on Tuesday after months of delays to accommodate a public outreach and education effort. Putting campaign finance reform on the ballot would eliminate the perception that the three incumbents for 2009, who have already started refilling their re-election coffers, are closing the fundraising door behind them as potential challengers still consider entering the race, City Council members said.
NEWS
January 19, 2008
Former councilman likely behind letters A recent letter to the editor regarding the need for campaign finance reform (?Watch for campaign finance reform, too,? Mailbag, Jan. 4) citing former Mayor Rafi Manoukian?s accepting large campaign donations from an applicant for a zone change has generated a number of letters in response attacking Councilman Frank Quintero. It does not take a genius, I think, to see the hand of Manoukian behind these letters. Today?s letter from Michael Kiamen (?
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