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Cell Towers

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NEWS
By Robert S. Hong | January 3, 2007
CRESCENTA VALLEY — A 60-foot cellphone tower will be built at a Crescenta Valley church after getting the green light from the Los Angeles County Department of Regional Planning Tuesday. Despite concern from the Crescenta Valley Town Council, Omnipoint Communications Inc. — a subsidiary of cellphone service provider T-Mobile — can now build its tower at Gethsemane Lutheran Church, which sits within 100 feet of homes. The Town Council sent a letter to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors last month asking that the county abide by a policy it wrote in April 2002 that requires cell towers be at least 100 feet from residences and at least 500 feet from any school, including day-care centers.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | June 8, 2009
CITY HALL — The City Council tonight is expected to extend a moratorium on cellular towers in residential neighborhoods for another year. The current moratorium, which was put in place to quell protests from north Glendale residents over a proposed T-Mobile antenna in the city’s right-of-way, is due to expire June 24. Attorneys were directed to come back with a draft ordinance that would establish a citywide policy for handling neighborhood...
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | June 10, 2009
CITY HALL — City officials will continue to craft a citywide policy for residential wireless micro-cellular sites after the City Council on Tuesday extended a moratorium on the equipment for another year. The moratorium was put in place to quell protests from North Glendale residents last year over a proposed T-Mobile antenna in the city’s right-of-way and allow time for revised regulations. The ban was set to expire June 24, but city officials said they needed more time to craft the new policy.
NEWS
December 15, 2011
Faced with providing service for ever more data-hungry cellphones, telecommunications carriers are in a nonstop race costing billions of dollars to boost the capacities of their networks. To handle the heavy volume of video, music and Web pages that smartphone users are downloading, office buildings, strip malls, condominiums, schools, churches and just about every other type of structure - including water towers and freeway overpasses - are being pressed into service as cell signal relay stations, or cell towers.
NEWS
By Mark Kellam, mark.kellam@latimes.com | August 16, 2011
AT&T officials showed off the company's stealth cellular antenna site Tuesday near the In-N-Out restaurant on Harvey Drive and said more sites are on the horizon - a signal of what may be to come as service providers seek to boost their capacity to handle the increased data demand of smart phones. The so-called stealth cell sites, masked to resemble trees or hidden inside flag poles, could ease their proliferation into dead zones where cell phone signals are weak. Efforts to do so in residential neighborhood have been met with strong resistance on aesthetic grounds and fears of unknown health risks.
NEWS
By By Fred Ortega | January 26, 2006
LA CA—ADA FLINTRIDGE -- The city is going to keep fighting to salvage its law regulating cell towers along its roadways, despite a decision last week by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that gutted portions of the ordinance. City officials announced Wednesday that they will seek a rehearing before the appeals court, which ruled on Jan. 17 that La Cañada Flintridge cannot regulate the placement of cell towers on public property based on aesthetics. The city's attorneys have until Jan. 31 to file a petition for rehearing.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | February 7, 2009
SOUTHEAST GLENDALE — T-Mobile is withdrawing its application to build a cellular antenna on the 500 block of Cumberland Road in response to strong residential opposition, company representatives said Thursday night. The announcement was made at a community meeting with neighbors of the planned “micro-cell” site in the city’s right-of-way. Residents’ complaints about the project prompted the City Council in January to impose a 45-day moratorium on cellular facilities in residential zones to allow time for a draft policy to handle future applications.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | April 25, 2008
A new cell tower antenna planned to be erected on a structure on Foothill Boulevard is sending waves of frustration for the Crescenta Valley Town Council as council members deal with how to prevent what a federal government mandate protects. A notice was recently received by the council in preparation for the scheduled 9 a.m. May 21 public hearing about the cell tower, to be held at the L.A. County Hall of Records, 320 W. Temple Street in Los Angeles. Since the government has mandated that human health cannot be an issue used to fight cellular towers, and the city of La Cañada Flintridge lost an attempt to fight a different tower, based on aesthetics, council members spent a good deal of the April 17 council meeting debating what, if any, basis could be used to state the council?
LOCAL
By John McMahon | October 27, 2009
I’m writing today to implore Glendale residents to come out and offer feedback on the city’s new draft wireless ordinance. In October 2008, I was home with a sick daughter when I noticed a group of contractors and city employees spray-painting the street in front of my house. Along with several neighbors, I quickly discovered that a 35-foot cell tower was days from being constructed five feet in front of my home. From there, a handful of local neighbors formed a community group called GO ACT, or Glendale Organized Against Cell Towers.
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NEWS
February 17, 2014
Good morning readers. Today's forecast calls for partly cloudy skies with a high of 73 and a low of 46. As you prepare yourself for the week, or bask in the fact you have the day off (lucky you!), check out these headlines from around our area:  Several homes were evacuated Sunday when a brush fire started in the Adams Hills neighborhood, charring a roughly two-acre hillside near  Forest Lawn  in Glendale, officials said. Glendale News-Press City officials will install a four-way stop sign at the intersection of Oak and Myers streets after requests from dozens of parents with children attending St. Finbar School in Burbank, who argued that the current two-way stop sign was unsafe for children walking to and from school.
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NEWS
February 15, 2014
AT&T has withdrawn a proposal to place a cell phone tower in La Crescenta after several concerned residents complained that it would be an eyesore and reduce property values. The telecommunications company had proposed to place a 70-foot tower in the 5000 block of Cloud Avenue on land owned by the Crescenta Valley Water District, saying the structure was necessary to ward off dropped calls and disconnects. But in an email sent on the evening of Friday, Feb. 14, to officials with the Water District, the Los Angeles County Department of Regional Planning and to Cheryl Davis, chair of the Crescenta Valley Town Council's Land Use Committee, AT&T withdrew the proposal.
NEWS
By Matt Sanderson | February 14, 2014
Dozens of concerned residents gathered at the La Crescenta Library Thursday night regarding a proposed cell phone tower several said would be an eyesore and reduce property values. AT&T officials want to place a 70-foot tower in the 5000 block of Cloud Avenue on land owned by the Crescenta Valley Water District, saying the structure is necessary to ward off dropped calls and disconnects. Jerry Ambrose, land use consultant with AT&T, told the audience the tower would be disguised as a eucalyptus tree, and will include 12 eight-foot antennas, 24 AT&T remote radio units, and several other pieces of equipment on the property, including a steel platform with a wood fence.
NEWS
January 20, 2013
Your "In Theory" column is a very interesting part of the newspaper. The thoughts conveyed by those responding to your question of the week are sometimes challenging. The issue of cell towers on churches, appearing in the Jan. 13 paper, failed to address the possible concerns of the congregations. A church is the house of God, and no final authorization should be determined without input from the entire congregation. Pastors can offer their opinions, but they function somewhat like an innkeeper and spiritual advisor.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
I'd like to see in the near term a review of the current policy the city has for community notification in R-1 zones where major improvements are planned using the city's easement rights for erecting/construction of wireless transmission facilities. The current process is deeply flawed and puts the homeowner or the homeowners association in an almost a no-win position, as well as in a financial straitjacket before we know what is hitting us. Signs that are posted become city property, which can't be touched during the 30-day notification period without being a misdemeanor even on homeowners association property.
NEWS
December 15, 2011
Faced with providing service for ever more data-hungry cellphones, telecommunications carriers are in a nonstop race costing billions of dollars to boost the capacities of their networks. To handle the heavy volume of video, music and Web pages that smartphone users are downloading, office buildings, strip malls, condominiums, schools, churches and just about every other type of structure - including water towers and freeway overpasses - are being pressed into service as cell signal relay stations, or cell towers.
NEWS
By Mark Kellam, mark.kellam@latimes.com | August 16, 2011
AT&T officials showed off the company's stealth cellular antenna site Tuesday near the In-N-Out restaurant on Harvey Drive and said more sites are on the horizon - a signal of what may be to come as service providers seek to boost their capacity to handle the increased data demand of smart phones. The so-called stealth cell sites, masked to resemble trees or hidden inside flag poles, could ease their proliferation into dead zones where cell phone signals are weak. Efforts to do so in residential neighborhood have been met with strong resistance on aesthetic grounds and fears of unknown health risks.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | April 14, 2010
CITY HALL — The City Council on Tuesday voted unanimously to more strictly regulate where and how cellular antennas are built in residential neighborhoods, a response to homeowner concerns that the equipment is unsightly and pulls down property values. The regulations take effect in 60 days and cap a yearlong process that started when north Glendale residents successfully organized against a proposed T-Mobile micro-cell site. Antennas and cell towers will be vetted through a tiered system in which cellular equipment proposed for residential areas or in an unattractive form would face a more intense review process, including a requirement for telecommunications companies to prove why they’re needed.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | April 13, 2010
CITY HALL — The City Council tonight voted unanimously to more strictly regulate where and how cellular antennas are built in residential neighborhoods, a response to homeowner concerns that the equipment is unsightly and pulls down property values. The regulations take effect in 60 days and cap a yearlong process that was sparked when north Glendale residents successfully organized against a proposed T-Mobile micro-cell site. Antennas and cell towers will be vetted through a tiered system in which cellular equipment proposed for residential areas or in an unattractive form would face a more intense review process, including a requirement for telecommunications companies to prove why they’re needed.
NEWS
April 8, 2010
The council introduced a set of regulations for local cellular antennas, setting the stage for a final vote next week. Officials have spent more than a year crafting the regulations. The council first introduced a moratorium on all cellular antenna applications in response to a T-Mobile proposal for the 500 block of Cumberland Road that prompted residents to organize an opposition campaign. The proposed regulations — which greatly increase city oversight of the antenna’s placement — take a tiered approach in which cellular equipment proposed for residential areas or in an “unattractive form” would face a more intense review process.
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