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Chinese New Year

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007
Pull out your wok and polish the chopsticks ? Chinese New Year is around the corner, and Sunday night is New Year's Eve. The first day of the traditional 15-day celebration coincides with the new moon. The gods are welcomed and some families abstain from meat. On the second day, prayers are offered to the ancestors. This is also considered the birthday of all dogs, so the family dog merits a treat and special attention. During the following two days, sons-in-law are expected to make a visit of respect to their wives' parents.
NEWS
January 27, 2000
Claudia Peschiutta LOS ANGELES ZOO -- Celebrate the new year -- again. The zoo is commemorating the upcoming Chinese New Year with several events themed around the Year of the Dragon. The festivities kick off at 11 a.m. Saturday with a ceremony featuring Manuel Mollinedo, director of the zoo, and KNBC-TV Channel 4 reporter Ted Chen. There will also be a short talk given about the zoo's Chinese alligators and Komodo dragons. Events will be held between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday in the Eucalyptus Grove, where free fortune cookies and red envelopes will be handed out and children will get to color their own Chinese dragons.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | February 2, 2009
Long, serpentine dragons zigzagged through Los Angeles streets, martial artists twirled swords and nunchucks, and in the middle of it all was the Hoover High School marching band. For the third consecutive year, the band marched in Chinatown’s Golden Dragon Parade, held Saturday in celebration of Chinese New Year, or the lunar new year, which began Jan. 26. Hundreds turned out to watch the parade and take part in a new year’s festival at the end of the 1.7-mile route, which circled the historic district and finished near the intersection of Cesar Chavez Avenue and Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2009
Throngs of onlookers celebrated the Chinese New Year on Sunday with drum performances, ribbon dances and, of course, red envelopes. Chinese and Korean dance troupes took their turns on the Americana at Brand green Sunday in celebration of the annual turn, also known as the Lunar New Year, which fell on Feb. 7 this year. Brightly dressed Chinese ribbon dancers took their turns among calm, synchronized Korean drummers and the requisite lion dance while hundreds watched. The holiday is hugely popular in mainland China, proliferating into the cultures of neighboring countries, including Korea, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia and others.
NEWS
April 22, 2002
The subject of the appropriate use of our nation's flag seems to have been replaced with an uproar over Ms. Carrico's egregious public behavior. Americans are extremely careful about how, when and where they express themselves on Cinco De Mayo, Christmas, Passover, St. Patrick's Day, Chinese New Year's, Gay Pride Day, etc. The Armenian request regarding the use of our flag, therefore, is a very good subject for a healthy debate. In spite of our being a nation where freedom of speech is a right, we greatly discourage personal attacks during public debate.
NEWS
May 5, 2001
Many of the letters regarding the lowering of the flag in commemoration of the Armenian Genocide seem to miss the significance of the Armenian population of Glendale. It is beyond simply being an enclave of a (vocal) minority. Glendale has the highest concentration of Armenians in a single city outside of Armenia. Therefore, Glendale is globally significant to Armenians. So, while the "getting Germany to lower its flag for Chinese New Year" analogy is a clever one, we have a distinct difference here in our city.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | January 26, 2009
A jubilant crowd cheered the Peking Acrobats on Sunday at the Alex Theatre as they jumped through hoops, juggled hats and balanced large vases and tables on their feet. The acrobats donned bright, colorful costumes and executed balancing acts and gymnastics as Chinese folk music played on the eve of the Chinese New Year, the year of the ox. The show opened with six girls waving red flags as acrobats dressed in lion costumes balanced themselves on a single step. The acrobats, who were still wearing lion costumes, jumped onto a large ball, moved the ball with their feet and onto a seesaw.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
Bea Jue passed away October 15, 2010.  She is survived by her six children and thirteen grand children and was proceeded in death by her husband of 40 years, Ed Jue.  Bea was born Beatrice T. Lee in Tuscan Arizona in 1932.  She holds a BA from the University of Arizona and her first career was as a teacher, first in San Diego and then at Cerritos Elementary in Glendale, CA. In 1965 she met, and married, Ed Jue. Together they traveled the world and enjoyed mah jong, lifelong friendships and gourmet food.
NEWS
August 2, 2000
Judy Seckler DOWNTOWN -- Just off of Central Avenue and a couple of blocks south of the Galleria lies the Windsor Crest Preschool. Barely visible from the street, the school provides year-round supervision and instruction for its tiny charges. Here, 48 children from 2 1/2 to 6 are given the space to boldly explore and conquer their universe. The preschool has been a program of the Salvation Army for 30 years, said Director Kandis Phipps, who has been at the school for 23 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Putnam | February 9, 2008
The Chinese New Year celebration is the most important of Chinese holidays. It begins on the first day of the new moon and lasts 15 days. It ends on the night of the full moon with a lantern festival. With so many Chinese restaurants in Burbank, you have no reason to stay at home during this festive season. My cousin Ron and I decided to start celebrating the Year of the Rat at the China Inn Bistro in Burbank. At first, I was confused by the atypical surroundings. Rather than the paper lanterns and deep red hues one naturally expects in any Chinese restaurant, you walk into a bright room flanked on both sides with blue-green colored booths.
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NEWS
October 19, 2010
Bea Jue passed away October 15, 2010.  She is survived by her six children and thirteen grand children and was proceeded in death by her husband of 40 years, Ed Jue.  Bea was born Beatrice T. Lee in Tuscan Arizona in 1932.  She holds a BA from the University of Arizona and her first career was as a teacher, first in San Diego and then at Cerritos Elementary in Glendale, CA. In 1965 she met, and married, Ed Jue. Together they traveled the world and enjoyed mah jong, lifelong friendships and gourmet food.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2009
Throngs of onlookers celebrated the Chinese New Year on Sunday with drum performances, ribbon dances and, of course, red envelopes. Chinese and Korean dance troupes took their turns on the Americana at Brand green Sunday in celebration of the annual turn, also known as the Lunar New Year, which fell on Feb. 7 this year. Brightly dressed Chinese ribbon dancers took their turns among calm, synchronized Korean drummers and the requisite lion dance while hundreds watched. The holiday is hugely popular in mainland China, proliferating into the cultures of neighboring countries, including Korea, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia and others.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | February 2, 2009
Long, serpentine dragons zigzagged through Los Angeles streets, martial artists twirled swords and nunchucks, and in the middle of it all was the Hoover High School marching band. For the third consecutive year, the band marched in Chinatown’s Golden Dragon Parade, held Saturday in celebration of Chinese New Year, or the lunar new year, which began Jan. 26. Hundreds turned out to watch the parade and take part in a new year’s festival at the end of the 1.7-mile route, which circled the historic district and finished near the intersection of Cesar Chavez Avenue and Broadway.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | January 26, 2009
A jubilant crowd cheered the Peking Acrobats on Sunday at the Alex Theatre as they jumped through hoops, juggled hats and balanced large vases and tables on their feet. The acrobats donned bright, colorful costumes and executed balancing acts and gymnastics as Chinese folk music played on the eve of the Chinese New Year, the year of the ox. The show opened with six girls waving red flags as acrobats dressed in lion costumes balanced themselves on a single step. The acrobats, who were still wearing lion costumes, jumped onto a large ball, moved the ball with their feet and onto a seesaw.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | February 21, 2008
Verdugo Woodlands Elementary School students got a virtual tour of several millennia of Chinese history and culture on Wednesday, as they watched the founder of the Lily Cai Chinese Dance Co. perform dances from several ancient Chinese dynasties. Lily Cai does solo performances at schools like Verdugo Woodlands through the Music Center of Los Angeles County’s education division. Dressed in flared pants, a beaded headdress and glittery necklaces, Cai demonstrated a court dance from the Tang Dynasty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Putnam | February 9, 2008
The Chinese New Year celebration is the most important of Chinese holidays. It begins on the first day of the new moon and lasts 15 days. It ends on the night of the full moon with a lantern festival. With so many Chinese restaurants in Burbank, you have no reason to stay at home during this festive season. My cousin Ron and I decided to start celebrating the Year of the Rat at the China Inn Bistro in Burbank. At first, I was confused by the atypical surroundings. Rather than the paper lanterns and deep red hues one naturally expects in any Chinese restaurant, you walk into a bright room flanked on both sides with blue-green colored booths.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007
Pull out your wok and polish the chopsticks ? Chinese New Year is around the corner, and Sunday night is New Year's Eve. The first day of the traditional 15-day celebration coincides with the new moon. The gods are welcomed and some families abstain from meat. On the second day, prayers are offered to the ancestors. This is also considered the birthday of all dogs, so the family dog merits a treat and special attention. During the following two days, sons-in-law are expected to make a visit of respect to their wives' parents.
NEWS
April 22, 2002
The subject of the appropriate use of our nation's flag seems to have been replaced with an uproar over Ms. Carrico's egregious public behavior. Americans are extremely careful about how, when and where they express themselves on Cinco De Mayo, Christmas, Passover, St. Patrick's Day, Chinese New Year's, Gay Pride Day, etc. The Armenian request regarding the use of our flag, therefore, is a very good subject for a healthy debate. In spite of our being a nation where freedom of speech is a right, we greatly discourage personal attacks during public debate.
NEWS
February 9, 2002
Joyce Rudolph GLENDALE -- Talk about a long tradition! The Peking Acrobats bring their 2,000-year-old one to The Alex Theatre in Glendale Sunday. This local gig is one stop in an extensive 50-city tour for this troupe of China's most gifted tumblers, contortionists, cyclists and gymnasts. They recently set the world record for the Human Chair Stack on Fox's Guinness Book Primetime show, having balanced six people atop six chairs 21 feet up in the air -- without safety lines!
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