Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsChromium
IN THE NEWS

Chromium

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | November 17, 2010
When Clark Magnet High School student Saro Meguerdijian learned last spring about the presence of hexavalent chromium in local groundwater, he began mentally working through a solution. Hexavalent chromium, a cancer-causing carcinogen also known as chromium 6, cannot be removed from water with a traditional filter. "I realized that while standard filtration might fail to remove miniscule hexavalent chromium ions, a negatively charged surface, which would be sticky to positive ions, could remove hexavalent chromium ions," Saro said.
NEWS
By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times | September 2, 2012
The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board has concluded an investigation into contamination on the site of the Walt Disney Studios, a senior board official said. The agency's decision comes a day after the Los Angeles Times reported that the board, along with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was investigating whether a vintage air conditioning system and cooling towers at Disney were the source of groundwater and soil contamination from chromium 6, a cancer-causing heavy metal.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
The California Department of Public Health has set a draft limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly lower than the current cap of 50 parts per billion for total chromium in drinking water. The state agency used more than a decade of research done by the city of Glendale to set the limit, which once its finalized will impact water providers statewide. “California is the first and only state in the nation to establish a maximum contaminant level specifically for chromium-6 in drinking water,” Ron Chapman, the department's director and public health officer said in a statement.
NEWS
By Jason Wells, jason.wells@latimes.com | July 27, 2011
Glendale Water & Power on Wednesday announced that it had received $400,000 to continue its work in testing two methods for stripping underground water of chromium 6. The utility has been the lead agency in a coalition of stakeholders testing two high-tech methods for stripping underground contaminated with the cancer-causing element left behind largely by the San Fernando Road corridor's former aerospace manufacturing industry. The latest grant was awarded by the U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Reclamation.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 5, 2014
The budget for Glendale's long-running research into a cancer-causing contaminant found in the city's groundwater is set to jump to roughly $11 million as the City Council this week approved another $1.1 million in grant funding. But after more than 13 years of research and numerous City Hall meetings requesting council approval for more funding for the chromium 6 research - the majority of which has been paid for by grants from the state and other water agencies - city officials said this would be the last time they'd ask to increase the program's budget.
NEWS
August 23, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- With Glendale a month away from using San Fernando Valley groundwater for the first time in two decades, the state has launched an investigation to identify companies responsible for chromium contamination in area water wells. The investigation by the Regional Water Control Board and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency started with the development of a list of more than 250 companies that could have contributed to the chromium contamination, said Mel Blevins, a court-appointed master who oversees water supplies for the region and is a member of a chromium task force.
NEWS
November 1, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- As the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board is about to step up its investigation of chromium 6 contamination, the agency has announced it will hold a workshop in Glendale to spur debate and help the public understand the chromium issue. The board could send out letters as early as next week to more than 200 area companies to notify them that inspectors will be visiting their properties to determine if there is contamination on the sites, according to Dennis Dickerson, executive director of the board.
NEWS
January 26, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) waded into the murky waters of the chromium 6 debate Thursday, releasing a two-pronged plan for addressing the issue. Schiff proposed that the National Toxicology Program conduct a study to determine whether chromium 6 -- which is known to be carcinogenic when inhaled -- is also hazardous when ingested in water. He also urged the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to release a definitive public health standard for chromium 6. No standard has been set for chromium 6 contamination.
NEWS
February 23, 2001
Claudia Peschiutta GLENDALE -- Two local legislators are working on a bill that would establish a state standard for chromium 6 levels in drinking water. Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Glendale) and state Sen. Jack Scott (D-Glendale) have joined other legislators in backing a bill introduced Thursday that would require the state Department of Health Services to set the standard. "It's the most important thing we can do," said Frommer, the measure's principal coauthor.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 12, 2012
Glendale Water & Power has started testing a new filtration method to strip chromium 6 from groundwater and plans to start the process for other techniques next month. Previous methods have had some drawbacks, prompting the fresh approaches. Filtration adds an extra step to current testing, but the others, which include using resins and absorption technology to suck out the cancer-causing contaminant, are new ventures. “We're blazing the trail here,” said Charles Cron, plant manager at a chromium 6 testing facility in northwest Glendale.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arin Mikailian, arin.mikailian@latimes.com | April 26, 2014
The levels of arsenic and chromium 6 in Glendale's drinking water are above recommended goals set by the state, giving local H20 a toxicity score in the 62nd percentile compared to other Los Angeles County cities, according to a report released by the California Environmental Protection Agency . Most tracts in the community earned scores like 57.74 out of 100, while a small southwestern section of Glendale had a score of 53.86, according to...
Advertisement
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 15, 2014
After receiving 18,000 comments, the California Department of Public Health on Tuesday recommended setting the maximum limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, bringing the new cap on the pollutant that has plagued Glendale water for decades one step closer to finalization. The recommendation is expected to be approved within 30 days by an administrative arm of the state government, known as the Office of Administrative Law, according to a statement released by the public health department.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 5, 2014
The budget for Glendale's long-running research into a cancer-causing contaminant found in the city's groundwater is set to jump to roughly $11 million as the City Council this week approved another $1.1 million in grant funding. But after more than 13 years of research and numerous City Hall meetings requesting council approval for more funding for the chromium 6 research - the majority of which has been paid for by grants from the state and other water agencies - city officials said this would be the last time they'd ask to increase the program's budget.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 11, 2013
In a letter to the California Department of Public Health this month, Glendale City Manager Scott Ochoa applauded the agency's draft limit on a cancer-causing water contaminant, but the majority of water agencies whose representatives spoke about the matter at a public hearing on Friday opposed the change. Those who oppose the draft limit, including Pasadena Water & Power, the Coachella Valley Water District and the San Gabriel Valley Water Assn., called the draft limit of 10 parts of Chromium 6 per billion cost-prohibitive and unnecessary.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 10, 2013
Councilman Ara Najarian tried to put the brakes on funding Tuesday for research into a water contaminant impacting Glendale groundwater, but the majority of the council voted to approve spending another roughly $600,000 on a project that has cost more than $9 million over more than a decade. Najarian said he voted against the funding because he felt the two types of removal methods analyzed thus far have been ineffective . Najarian was also upset that city officials rebuffed a new filtration method invented by a professor from Yerevan University in Armenia, whom he introduced to city staff.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 23, 2013
While welcoming a draft of a proposed and long-awaited limit on the drinking water contaminant chromium 6, local politicians said they fear the state standard doesn't go far enough. The California Department of Public Health on Thursday set a draft limit of chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly higher than a goal set by state officials in 2011. At the time, officials set a goal of 0.02 parts per billion for the cancer-causing ion, but the Department of Public Health decided on a much higher maximum level, stating that the lower target would not be economically feasible for water agencies.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
The California Department of Public Health has set a draft limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly lower than the current cap of 50 parts per billion for total chromium in drinking water. The state agency used more than a decade of research done by the city of Glendale to set the limit, which once its finalized will impact water providers statewide. “California is the first and only state in the nation to establish a maximum contaminant level specifically for chromium-6 in drinking water,” Ron Chapman, the department's director and public health officer said in a statement.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
After overseeing a multi-million dollar project to research high-tech methods for stripping ground water of the cancer-causing element chromium 6, Glendale officials this week set aside hundreds of thousands more to figure out how to make the process cheaper. The move comes just weeks before the California Department of Public Health is scheduled to release a draft proposal that would set a limit for how much chromium 6 - made famous by the movie “Erin Brokovich” - will be allowed in public drinking water.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 9, 2013
This article has been amended, see note below for details. After spending more than 10 years and roughly $9 million, engineers testing two high-tech methods for removing chromium 6 from groundwater say neither method can reliably bring levels of the cancer-causing contaminant down to the point where it would hit a state public health goal. In 2011, the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment set a goal of drastically reducing the amount of chromium 6 - the contaminant brought to notoriety by the 2000 film “Erin Brokovich” - in the water supply.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 2, 2012
After more than a decade and nearly $9 million, Glendale is nearing the end of its research into the water contaminant chromium 6. After the City Council this week approved using $536,000 to put the final touches on the research project, officials said it would be the last time they would be dealing with the money side of what has morphed into a national research effort for the most effective - and financially prudent - method for stripping the...
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|