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Chromium

NEWS
January 19, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- Chromium 6 contamination of ground water, a problem that hits close to home for city residents, will be the focus of a conference next week in Glendale. The Jan. 25 conference, sponsored by the nonprofit Groundwater Resources Assn. of California, will bring together experts from government agencies, ground water providers and industry groups. The point of the event, association secretary Jim Carter said, is to get a clearer picture of how chromium 6 affects ground water and how the problem can be approached.
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NEWS
October 7, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- In the face of mounting public concern about chromium 6 in the drinking water, city and county officials said they are moving to lower levels of the chemical in the San Fernando Valley Aquifer. Earlier this week, officials said that tests conducted on tap water at 110 county facilities revealed unexpectedly high levels of the carcinogen chromium 6, with the highest reading coming from the Burbank Health Center at 110 W. Magnolia Blvd.
NEWS
January 2, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- Today is the deadline set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the city to deal with its drinking water problems, but no resolution has been reached. Glendale has been dumping water from underground aquifers into the Los Angeles River because of concerns that it contains chromium 6, which can be carcinogenic under some circumstances. The EPA, which frowns on the practice, told the city it had only through today to continue dumping without penalty.
NEWS
October 16, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- Removing chromium 6 from Glendale's ground water could run as high as $7 to $8 million for equipment, City Manager Jim Starbird said Friday. The numbers are part of a report being prepared for the Glendale City Council, which will be looking at alternatives in the upcoming weeks for reducing the chemical in water extracted from wells. The council will have a discussion Tuesday on hiring a Santa Monica firm to serve as an environmental consultant on the water-quality issues facing the city.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | September 9, 2008
CITY HALL — A multimillion-dollar, cross-jurisdictional chromium 6 removal project for Glendale wells is scheduled for a major financial boost tonight, when the City Council is expected to make official a $431,122 private industry contribution toward the effort. Glendale Respondents Group LLC — made up of more than a dozen industrial corporations such as Lockheed Martin and Honeywell that were “potentially” responsible for groundwater contamination over the past several decades — agreed to contribute the money after negotiations this summer with Glendale Water & Power, the lead agency in the ongoing chromium 6 removal research project.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 9, 2013
This article has been amended, see note below for details. After spending more than 10 years and roughly $9 million, engineers testing two high-tech methods for removing chromium 6 from groundwater say neither method can reliably bring levels of the cancer-causing contaminant down to the point where it would hit a state public health goal. In 2011, the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment set a goal of drastically reducing the amount of chromium 6 - the contaminant brought to notoriety by the 2000 film “Erin Brokovich” - in the water supply.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 1, 2012
Despite efforts to stop it, the chemical Chromium 6 has been seeping into Glendale groundwater for years at the site of a defunct plating company. By early next month, that will start to change. Ralphs Grocery Co. plans to finalize the purchase of the nearly 1-acre property near the border of Los Angeles and Glendale within the next two weeks. With that done, it will begin cleaning up the contaminated dirt left behind by Excello Plating Co. in order to expand the grocer's distribution center next door.
NEWS
August 6, 2003
Joshua Pelzer The city hopes to become a national leader in producing cleaner and safer drinking water, using elements of a new system it put on display Tuesday. City officials were joined by Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) at the Glendale Water Treatment Plant to inspect a pilot program to remove chromium 6 and other industrial solvents from the city's water supply. Federal studies are underway to determine the overall health effects of chromium 6, a toxic compound that acts as a carcinogen when inhaled.
NEWS
March 10, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- The regulatory nightmare of chromium 6 contamination could be coming to an end through proposed changes in the way the city's ground water wells are used, but officials say they still aren't sure their plan will work. In a meeting this week with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Glendale officials sketched out the details of their plan, which attempts to find a middle ground between the conflicting demands of three different bureaucracies.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
After overseeing a multi-million dollar project to research high-tech methods for stripping ground water of the cancer-causing element chromium 6, Glendale officials this week set aside hundreds of thousands more to figure out how to make the process cheaper. The move comes just weeks before the California Department of Public Health is scheduled to release a draft proposal that would set a limit for how much chromium 6 - made famous by the movie “Erin Brokovich” - will be allowed in public drinking water.
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