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Chromium

NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 18, 2012
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans to install 30 wells in the Glendale-Burbank region in March to monitor levels of chromium 6 in underground water to get a fuller picture of how extensive the contamination is. The move is another step in the federal agency's 2007 investigation into the cancer-causing element's potential threats to human health and the environment. The investigation will also aid California officials who are considering tighter restrictions on how much of the toxic element should be allowed in potable water.
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NEWS
January 16, 2002
Marshall Allen GLENDALE -- Chromium 6 is great for industry, but bad for the body when inhaled -- this much is known. But the presentations by scientists Monday evening at a City Hall public meeting on chromium 6 -- moderated by Congressman Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) -- showed that much is unknown. Chromium is not easy to define, and therefore is hard to regulate. Plus, more research needs to be done. One challenge is that chromium can exist in many states.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | December 18, 2010
CITY HALL — Glendale Water & Power officials are pushing to expand a multimillion-dollar chromium 6 removal project after long-stalled state funding was freed up. The stalled grant reimbursements from the state had prompted utility officials to threaten suspending operations at the two test facilities, a move that would have been a major setback for a project that could end up having far-reaching implications for how agencies strip the...
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | September 13, 2010
CITY HALL — Regional water officials have been discussing progress on a Glendale Water & Power chromium 6 removal project, as the utility awaits millions in reimbursement from the state. Last week, the advisory committee for the $5-million multi-jurisdictional research project met to receive an update on its final phase — facilities testing two methods for stripping the cancer-causing contaminant from the water supply. Committee members said the long-awaited information would help agencies across the state determine the most cost-effective methods for the contaminant's removal.
NEWS
February 5, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) on Friday expressed support for Glendale's approach to dealing with chromium 6 in its drinking water. Glendale, in defiance of requests by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to use water containing chromium 6, has been dumping the water. City officials say conflicting state and federal standards for chromium safety make it difficult to know whether the water should be used. Schiff wrote that he understood the city's concerns about the safety of the water.
NEWS
August 24, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- Half of the more than 250 companies targeted in a state investigation for sources of chromium in the 112,000 acre-San Fernando Basin aquifer are based in the Glendale-Burbank area, according to the head of a chromium task force. The investigation by the Regional Water Quality Control Board comes as Glendale Water & Power Wednesday said it is trying to reassure the public that the drinking water supply is safe. The water department received a handful of calls this week after the Los Angeles Times published an article Sunday on how state calls for slashing levels of the suspected cancer-causing agent have gone unheeded, despite fears the level of chromium 6 in turning up in greater quantifies in wells, particularly in the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
January 11, 2002
Gretchen Hoffman GLENDALE -- The health effects of chromium 6 in drinking water are under debate, but Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) wants to make sure residents are up to date on the latest research. Federal scientists will testify about that research findings at a community meeting at 6 p.m. Monday at Glendale City Hall, 613 E. Broadway. The meeting is co-sponsored by Schiff, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health and the city of Glendale.
NEWS
January 9, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- For months, chromium 6 in the ground water has looked like an almost intractable public health problem, but city officials say they're getting closer to a solution. Glendale has through the end of January to tell the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency what its long-range plan is for dealing with its chromium-tainted water. The water, which comes from underground aquifers, contains between 15 and 17 parts per billion of chromium 6, a substance that can be carcinogenic under some circumstances.
NEWS
November 29, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- A month after they heard testimony about the health dangers of chromium 6, four state lawmakers on Tuesday asked the state health agency to take a more active role informing the public about the carcinogen. During a news conference at Burbank City Hall, the legislators called on the Department of Health Services to adopt an "action level" plan for the information campaign about chromium 6, also known as hexavalent chromium.
NEWS
September 1, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- Glendale is looking at ways to reduce the level of chromium 6 in drinking water and show the public its supply coming out of the faucet is safe. In an interview Thursday, City Manager Jim Starbird said he wants to alleviate public concerns and ensure that Glendale's drinking supply will be safe when ground water from the contaminated San Fernando Basin aquifer is used by the city Sept. 25 for the first time in decades. The city announced it will hire a consultant to review potentially costly options, and test drinking water at sampling stations in front of homes.
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