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Chromium

NEWS
April 7, 2001
Claudia Peschiutta NORTHWEST GLENDALE -- Scientists and politicians came together Friday to assure the public they are working to find out what can happen when chromium 6 gets into drinking water. Using the huge metal tanks of the Glendale Water Treatment Plant as a backdrop, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) and other officials announced the National Toxicology Program will soon begin a series of studies on the chemical and its effects. There are "many questions, very few answers," said Schiff, who coauthored a request for the study.
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NEWS
September 14, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- A state investigation to determine the sources of chromium 6 in area groundwater has been narrowed to 210 companies that will be targeted for on-site inspections starting in October, according to an official with the Regional Water Quality Control Board. The move by the state agency that is coordinating the effort with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is causing growing concern among officials of area companies that have used chromium in manufacturing and industrial processes in the past.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | September 10, 2008
CITY HALL — A $4-million project that will test two methods of chromium 6 removal technology at separate Glendale wells lurched forward Tuesday after the City Council approved a $1.8-million contract to build the facilities. The move to approve the project plans was a significant step in the city’s history of fighting underground contamination of water supplies left behind by war-era manufacturing plants along the San Fernando Road corridor. Glendale Water & Power is the lead agency in the multi-jurisdictional removal demonstration project, but has received strong support from state health officials who are developing a new threshold for levels of chromium 6 in drinking water statewide.
NEWS
December 9, 2000
Alex Coolman CITY HALL -- A meeting between Glendale officials and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week did not resolve questions about what the city should do with its controversial supply of drinking water. Wendy Chavez, a spokeswoman for the EPA, said Wednesday's meeting helped the federal environmental officials get a better understanding of Glendale's situation. But, as expected, it didn't give the city any clearer sense of what it should do with drinking water containing chromium 6. The city draws the water from underground aquifers, but has been dumping it into the Los Angeles River because of concerns about its safety.
NEWS
September 30, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- First, chromium 6. Now, arsenic. The concerns over chromium 6 in Glendale's water supply and that of the rest of the region could be overshadowed in the upcoming months by tougher proposed drinking water standards for arsenic -- a carcinogen considered more dangerous than chromium 6 whose health effects on drinking water are still being debated. With final rules to be announced by Jan. 1, the U.S. EPA has proposed setting a standard of 5 parts per billion of arsenic, down from the existing, 58-year-old standard of 50 parts per billion.
NEWS
By: Fred Ortega | October 13, 2005
The city has received a $100,000 grant to fund construction of a pioneering treatment facility that will remove chromium 6 from local groundwater. The money, provided by American WaterWorks Assn. Research Foundation, a water industry trade group, will be added to $900,000 in Environmental Protection Agency grants to build a test facility in the San Fernando Road corridor. The facility is the last step in a three-phase, $3-million program embarked upon in 2002 between Los Angeles, Burbank, Glendale and San Fernando to look for ways to rid water of chromium 6, a naturally occurring compound used to finish metal that has been found to cause cancer in humans when inhaled.
NEWS
March 1, 2003
Tim Willert A toxicologist who resigned under protest from a blue-ribbon panel charged with determining the dangers of chromium 6 in drinking water testified Friday that the panel's report should not be used as a basis for establishing public-health standards. Joseph Froines, a professor of toxicology for the UCLA School of Public Health, and the first scientist named to the panel, told a hearing of the Senate Health and Human Services Committee that the state-sponsored study was too limited in its scope and depth and didn't acknowledge the uncertainties of its research.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 23, 2013
While welcoming a draft of a proposed and long-awaited limit on the drinking water contaminant chromium 6, local politicians said they fear the state standard doesn't go far enough. The California Department of Public Health on Thursday set a draft limit of chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly higher than a goal set by state officials in 2011. At the time, officials set a goal of 0.02 parts per billion for the cancer-causing ion, but the Department of Public Health decided on a much higher maximum level, stating that the lower target would not be economically feasible for water agencies.
NEWS
March 14, 2001
Claudia Peschiutta GLENDALE -- Rep. Adam Schiff and other members of the California Congressional delegation are asking for an answers about chromium 6 and its effects. Schiff (D-Glendale) and 10 fellow legislators sent a letter Tuesday urging the National Toxicology Program to conduct a study to determine the carcinogenicity of chromium 6 in drinking water. Low levels of chromium 6 have been discovered in drinking water available to Glendale.
NEWS
June 6, 2001
Tim Willert GLENDALE -- A bill authored by state Sen. Jack Scott (D-Glendale) that would require the state health department to find ways to remove chromium 6 from drinking water has passed the Senate. The bill, passed Monday and sent to the Assembly, would also require the health department make its findings public, Scott said Tuesday. "They are the scientists," Scott said. "I want them to verify, study, examine and determine what are the ways to most effectively remove chromium 6 from the water."
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