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Chromium

NEWS
September 30, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- Gov. Gray Davis signed a bill Friday that would speed up a review of the health effects of chromium 6 in the drinking water. The bill authored by Sen. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) requires the state Department of Health Services to complete the study by January 2002. State health officials had previously said such a review would take five more years. The Department of Health Services is deciding whether the standard for total chromium in drinking water -- presently at 50 parts per billion -- should be lowered.
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NEWS
November 9, 2001
Karen S. Kim GLENDALE -- Glendale city officials and federal legislators cemented a partnership Thursday to eradicate chromium 6 and other heavy metals from Glendale's groundwater. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Glendale) and U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) secured $750,000 in federal funding to continue Glendale's research on chromium removal technologies. The money is also earmarked for building a pilot treatment plant in Glendale that removes heavy metals like arsenic, lead and chromium 6 from groundwater.
NEWS
November 16, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- Glendale has cut back on the amount of ground water it is drawing from two wells heavily contaminated with chromium 6 in order to meet state standards for dumping the water into the Los Angeles River. The city's action was in response to a letter sent to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board. It called on the EPA for assurances that the standard of 11 parts per billion of chromium 6 is not exceeded when water is dumped into the river.
NEWS
January 15, 2001
Alex Coolman CITY HALL -- The City Council at its Tuesday meeting will consider hiring a consulting firm -- at a price of about $50,000 -- to help with its chromium 6 woes. The firm, McGuire Environmental Consultants, Inc., would be brought on to evaluate the feasibility of treating the city's contaminated sources of drinking water. Glendale's underground aquifers contain small amounts of chromium 6, a substance that can be carcinogenic under certain circumstances.
NEWS
September 14, 2000
Buck Wargo GLENDALE -- Chromium 6 may have been in the ground for decades but has just found its way into the drinking water supply in recent years, according to state official overseeing an investigation on how the pollutant got there. No chromium 6 was found in the groundwater when a federal Superfund investigation began in the mid-1980s, said Dixon Oriola, a senior engineering geologist at the Regional Water Quality Control Board, which is investigation the source of the contamination.
NEWS
February 21, 2001
Alex Coolman GLENDALE -- State Sen. Jack Scott (D-Glendale) will introduce a bill this week that would put $15 million toward finding technologies for dealing with chromium 6 contamination in water. The bill, which Scott plans to introduce some time before Friday, would give money from the state's general fund to the Department of Health Services for the purpose of trying out new treatment technologies, said Arwen Chenery, a legislative aide in Scott's office.
NEWS
By By Fred Ortega | October 13, 2005
City will construct treatment facility to remove chromium from groundwater.GLENDALE -- The city has received a $100,000 grant to fund construction of a pioneering treatment facility that will remove chromium 6 from local groundwater. The money, provided by American WaterWorks Assn. Research Foundation, a water industry trade group, will be added to $900,000 in Environmental Protection Agency grants to build a test facility in the San Fernando Road corridor. The facility is the last step in a three-phase, $3-million program embarked upon in 2002 between Los Angeles, Burbank, Glendale and San Fernando to look for ways to rid water of chromium 6, a naturally occurring compound used to finish metal that has been found to cause cancer in humans when inhaled.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 5, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) took the California Department of Public Health to task Monday for “dragging its feet” on setting new limits on chromium 6 in drinking water, adding to a growing chorus of frustration among local officials. In a letter sent to the department's director Monday, Schiff called the years-long process for setting more strict contamination limits “unconscionable.” “I want to try to light a fire under them to get moving,” Schiff said in a phone interview.
NEWS
By Richard Verrier and Chip Jacobs, Los Angeles Times | August 22, 2012
Federal and state regulators are investigating whether a vintage air conditioning system at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank played a role in contaminating groundwater with chromium 6, a cancer-causing heavy metal widely used in aerospace manufacturing and other industries. A consultant hired by the Environmental Protection Agency recently identified the Disney property among a list of facilities being “investigated as potential sources of chromium contamination in groundwater,” according to an April 2012 report recently posted on the agency's website.
NEWS
By Tania Chatila | October 13, 2006
CITY HALL — A panel of water-quality experts advised the city Thursday on various technologies that could be used to treat and remove chromium 6 from local groundwater. None of the city's water sources come close to containing the maximum levels of the contaminant that the state allows, but Environmental Protection Agency projections estimate that in the next five years, Glendale could exceed that level. "It's important for us to maintain the momentum [toward a solution]
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