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NEWS
By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times | September 2, 2012
The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board has concluded an investigation into contamination on the site of the Walt Disney Studios, a senior board official said. The agency's decision comes a day after the Los Angeles Times reported that the board, along with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was investigating whether a vintage air conditioning system and cooling towers at Disney were the source of groundwater and soil contamination from chromium 6, a cancer-causing heavy metal.
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NEWS
By Richard Verrier and Chip Jacobs, Los Angeles Times | August 22, 2012
Federal and state regulators are investigating whether a vintage air conditioning system at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank played a role in contaminating groundwater with chromium 6, a cancer-causing heavy metal widely used in aerospace manufacturing and other industries. A consultant hired by the Environmental Protection Agency recently identified the Disney property among a list of facilities being “investigated as potential sources of chromium contamination in groundwater,” according to an April 2012 report recently posted on the agency's website.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 13, 2012
For the first time, a Glendale research team testing methods for stripping chromium 6 from groundwater has released an estimate for how much it will cost long term - putting the tab at up to $27 million over 20 years. The costs will be a key consideration for the California Department of Public Health, which plans to use the more than 10 years of research carried out by Glendale Water & Power to set a new maximum contaminant level for cancer-causing hexavalent chromium. In doing so, state officials must consider the costs and technical feasibility.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 1, 2012
Despite efforts to stop it, the chemical Chromium 6 has been seeping into Glendale groundwater for years at the site of a defunct plating company. By early next month, that will start to change. Ralphs Grocery Co. plans to finalize the purchase of the nearly 1-acre property near the border of Los Angeles and Glendale within the next two weeks. With that done, it will begin cleaning up the contaminated dirt left behind by Excello Plating Co. in order to expand the grocer's distribution center next door.
NEWS
By Jason Wells, jason.wells@latimes.com | March 27, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) on Tuesday introduced legislation that would set a deadline for establishing a new federal cap on chromium 6 contamination in drinking water. The move comes two weeks after the congressman called on the Environmental Protection Agency to release a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans. Those findings - which would be key for setting new maximum contamination levels - were postponed so the agency could also finish studying the effects of inhaling hexavalent chromium, and then release both reports at the same time.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 14, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) increased pressure on the Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday to issue a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans, calling the slow progress “unconscionable.” In his letter to U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, the congressman whose district has a long-running problem with chromium 6 contamination of underground water said the agency “must stop wasting time...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 12, 2012
Glendale Water & Power has started testing a new filtration method to strip chromium 6 from groundwater and plans to start the process for other techniques next month. Previous methods have had some drawbacks, prompting the fresh approaches. Filtration adds an extra step to current testing, but the others, which include using resins and absorption technology to suck out the cancer-causing contaminant, are new ventures. “We're blazing the trail here,” said Charles Cron, plant manager at a chromium 6 testing facility in northwest Glendale.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 5, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) took the California Department of Public Health to task Monday for “dragging its feet” on setting new limits on chromium 6 in drinking water, adding to a growing chorus of frustration among local officials. In a letter sent to the department's director Monday, Schiff called the years-long process for setting more strict contamination limits “unconscionable.” “I want to try to light a fire under them to get moving,” Schiff said in a phone interview.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich today slammed public health officials for “pathetic bureaucratic inertia” in establishing new maximum allowed levels of chromium-6 in public drinking water. The California Department of Public Health and state EPA have been working for years to establish a new “maximum contaminant level” for hexavalent chromium, which is known to cause cancer, but Antonovich said the process has been too slow. Chromium-6 is currently regulated at under the 50-micrograms per liter, but in 2011, a proposal was submitted to reduce that to 0.02- micrograms per liter.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 18, 2012
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans to install 30 wells in the Glendale-Burbank region in March to monitor levels of chromium 6 in underground water to get a fuller picture of how extensive the contamination is. The move is another step in the federal agency's 2007 investigation into the cancer-causing element's potential threats to human health and the environment. The investigation will also aid California officials who are considering tighter restrictions on how much of the toxic element should be allowed in potable water.
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