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Citizenship

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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 21, 2013
For Nazik Parazyan, taking the test to become a citizen in 2010 was a breeze because she had already lived in Glendale for 11 years. It takes about five years to apply for citizenship after getting a green card, but Parazyan couldn't get one. She came to the United States seeking asylum, like many others immigrating to Glendale from Armenia in the 1990s. Although her status as someone fleeing from fear of persecution was approved within four months, it would be nearly a decade before her green-card application was approved.
NEWS
March 8, 2001
Alex Coolman NORTHEAST GLENDALE -- Yegnazar Patatanyan came to this country from Armenia in 1987, but he didn't manage to become a citizen for years. Wednesday night, Patatanyan and dozens of other naturalized Americans gathered in the auditorium of Marshall Elementary School. As Thomas Jefferson impersonator Dale Reynolds gave a rousing recitation of the "Declaration of Independence," the group celebrated the accomplishment of becoming citizens.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | December 6, 2012
During a casual conversation with lifelong friends last week, we somehow arrived on the topic of citizenship. Both of them were born right here in Los Angeles, and they knew I was not. What they hadn't known, and what I really hadn't thought about since I was a teenager, was that I became a citizen of the U.S. exactly 10 years ago. It was a quirky, albeit initially shocking revelation. Between sips of tea, we spoke about the long and arduous immigration process, from seeking asylum in the U.S. to being refugees, to becoming permanent residents and then, finally, receiving citizenship automatically through my parents because I was underage at the time.
NEWS
April 19, 2003
Altrusa International of Glendale will host a reception for 25 new citizens Wednesday, and Abraham Lincoln is expected to attend. Lincoln impersonator J.P. Wammack, along with state and city dignitaries, will attend the reception, which will be from 7 to 9 p.m. in the auditorium at Marshall Elementary School, 1201 E. Broadway. The event is not open to the public. Adults who have completed Glendale Community College's citizenship program will be honored at the reception.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert, max.zimbert@latimes.com | July 23, 2010
DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES — Fifteen-year-old Mihran Houhannesyan raised his right hand, said a few words, and picked up his citizenship certificate moments later, getting a high-five and hug from his mother. But there was a problem. "I don't like the picture," Mihran said. No matter, the Glendale resident was granted citizenship Thursday in a ceremony of more than 110 people representing 28 countries, organizers said. "This is the paper," Mirhan's mother, Vardanush Houhannesyan, said.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
Altrusa International of Glendale honored 20 adult students Wednesday for completing the necessary coursework to become citizens of the U.S. The ceremony was held at Marshall Elementary School . Students completed a nine-week Community Based English Tutoring class and learned how to apply for citizenship. The ceremony commemorated the completion of the course. Students were sworn in as citizens prior to Wednesday's ceremony. Students learned about American history, government and the responsibilities of good citizenship, and were expected to develop solid English-language skills.
NEWS
March 12, 2002
Tim Willert GLENDALE -- After a short hiatus, the Character & Ethics Project Awards Program is back. Nominations for April recognition must be received by March 22. An awards ceremony will be at 3 p.m. April 18 in the Glendale Central Library auditorium. The program, launched in January 2000, recognizes businesses and employees who exemplify one or more of the project's 12 guiding principles. Those include respect, honesty, trustworthiness, loyalty, courtesy, self-discipline, integrity, fairness, responsibility, cooperation, citizenship and compassion.
NEWS
April 21, 2003
Hamlet Nalbandyan For the first time since Michelle Greco picked up a basketball, she has no control of what her next move on the court will be. Thanks to the recent labor conflicts in the WNBA, the former Crescenta Valley High standout, like so many graduating seniors this season, is facing an uncertain future in the game of basketball. On Friday, the WNBA and its players' association agreed to a five-year collective bargaining deal in principle, but the deal hasn't been finalized yet, which means that the season and the league's future is still in jeopardy.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | February 15, 2008
I confess to having some difficulty with all the furor created over the absentee ballot applications. Some in our community have called it a “racist” issue, which I find confusing given that individuals from two different groups, Armenians and Koreans, have objected to the proposed change in the present absentee ballot procedures. Which “race” is it that is being targeted for unequal treatment? One group claims that the proposed change is directed only at “its people,” thereby disregarding the objections of the other group.
NEWS
November 20, 2004
Darleene Barrientos When Evelina Kazaryan prepared to do a drawing about responsibility, she thought of a mother bird taking care of her eggs. "I thought of the different colors and shapes as other animals also taking care of the eggs," Evelina said. The thoughtfulness, color and insight of the 11-year-old girl's drawing was so impressive to the Glendale Character & Ethics project board members that it was selected to grace the cover of their organization's inaugural calendar.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 21, 2013
For Nazik Parazyan, taking the test to become a citizen in 2010 was a breeze because she had already lived in Glendale for 11 years. It takes about five years to apply for citizenship after getting a green card, but Parazyan couldn't get one. She came to the United States seeking asylum, like many others immigrating to Glendale from Armenia in the 1990s. Although her status as someone fleeing from fear of persecution was approved within four months, it would be nearly a decade before her green-card application was approved.
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NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | December 6, 2012
During a casual conversation with lifelong friends last week, we somehow arrived on the topic of citizenship. Both of them were born right here in Los Angeles, and they knew I was not. What they hadn't known, and what I really hadn't thought about since I was a teenager, was that I became a citizen of the U.S. exactly 10 years ago. It was a quirky, albeit initially shocking revelation. Between sips of tea, we spoke about the long and arduous immigration process, from seeking asylum in the U.S. to being refugees, to becoming permanent residents and then, finally, receiving citizenship automatically through my parents because I was underage at the time.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | June 24, 2012
A Glendale Community College counselor who works extensively with undocumented students said he welcomes the spirit of a recent executive order freezing the deportation of some young illegal immigrants, but added that it will have limited effect on their ability to achieve legal residency and get career-track jobs. President Obama announced on June 15 that some illegal immigrants 30 years old and younger will be permitted to apply with the federal government for a two-year deportation waiver.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | October 16, 2011
Anahit Grigoryan has long dreamed of becoming a doctor. She graduated from Glendale High School in 2009, enrolled in community college and set her sights on transferring to a four-year institution. But the 20-year-old would not be allowed to sit for the MCATs, much less take the Hippocratic Oath. Grigoryan, like thousands of other California college students, is in this country illegally, making it impossible for her to secure a social security number, a driver's license or a legitimate job. “My whole life is a lie,” said Grigoryan.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert, max.zimbert@latimes.com | July 23, 2010
DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES — Fifteen-year-old Mihran Houhannesyan raised his right hand, said a few words, and picked up his citizenship certificate moments later, getting a high-five and hug from his mother. But there was a problem. "I don't like the picture," Mihran said. No matter, the Glendale resident was granted citizenship Thursday in a ceremony of more than 110 people representing 28 countries, organizers said. "This is the paper," Mirhan's mother, Vardanush Houhannesyan, said.
FEATURES
By Rima Bek | April 24, 2010
Tae Yoo, 22, emigrated from South Korea to America with his father, mother and sister more than a dozen years ago. The former La Crescenta resident dreams of being successful in making films, writing a book, and even running for a congressional or city council position, he said. “This may sound cheesy, but the ultimate goal is to achieve the American dream, since I am a foreigner,” said Yoo, who lives in Sunland. At Cal State Northridge, Yoo is majoring in screenwriting and history, with a minor in religious studies.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | February 15, 2008
I confess to having some difficulty with all the furor created over the absentee ballot applications. Some in our community have called it a “racist” issue, which I find confusing given that individuals from two different groups, Armenians and Koreans, have objected to the proposed change in the present absentee ballot procedures. Which “race” is it that is being targeted for unequal treatment? One group claims that the proposed change is directed only at “its people,” thereby disregarding the objections of the other group.
NEWS
November 20, 2004
Darleene Barrientos When Evelina Kazaryan prepared to do a drawing about responsibility, she thought of a mother bird taking care of her eggs. "I thought of the different colors and shapes as other animals also taking care of the eggs," Evelina said. The thoughtfulness, color and insight of the 11-year-old girl's drawing was so impressive to the Glendale Character & Ethics project board members that it was selected to grace the cover of their organization's inaugural calendar.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
Altrusa International of Glendale honored 20 adult students Wednesday for completing the necessary coursework to become citizens of the U.S. The ceremony was held at Marshall Elementary School . Students completed a nine-week Community Based English Tutoring class and learned how to apply for citizenship. The ceremony commemorated the completion of the course. Students were sworn in as citizens prior to Wednesday's ceremony. Students learned about American history, government and the responsibilities of good citizenship, and were expected to develop solid English-language skills.
NEWS
April 21, 2003
Hamlet Nalbandyan For the first time since Michelle Greco picked up a basketball, she has no control of what her next move on the court will be. Thanks to the recent labor conflicts in the WNBA, the former Crescenta Valley High standout, like so many graduating seniors this season, is facing an uncertain future in the game of basketball. On Friday, the WNBA and its players' association agreed to a five-year collective bargaining deal in principle, but the deal hasn't been finalized yet, which means that the season and the league's future is still in jeopardy.
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