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NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | April 27, 2010
CITY HALL — Fees and rates attached to some city services, such as trash pick-up and the city’s Beeline buses, could increase as city officials try to balance stagnant revenues with the increasing costs of service, officials said. “We are at the point where we are consuming every bit of money each year that we are making,” Public Works Director Steve Zurn said of operating the city’s bus and Dial-A-Ride service. “It’s time for us to get together to talk about what the future is of our lines and service.
BUSINESS
By Zain Shauk | April 7, 2010
CITY HALL — City officials on Tuesday reiterated their commitment to improving Glendale’s economy through a range of plans for business development, luring new companies to the area and building a brand identity that consumers can relate to. Their statements came during an update from Glendale development officials about the state of the city’s economy and efforts to address unemployment and low sales tax revenues. The city’s most recent measure of sales tax revenues, from the third quarter of 2009, shows they were down 13.7%, Development Services Director Philip Lanzafame said.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | July 30, 2009
CITY HALL — Ethnic diversity in the city’s workforce has continued to increase in recent years, representing a significant jump in minority representation from 1998 to 2008, according to the city’s most recent workforce demographic report. Last year, whites made up 43.9% of the city’s workforce, compared with 57.5% in 1998, according to the report. Meanwhile, representation of most minority groups has grown, with African Americans seeing their ranks grow by 21% within the 10-year period.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | October 29, 2009
CITY HALL — Adult smoking rates in Glendale have dropped significantly since 2005, but obesity rates have climbed, according to a large-scale report on the city’s health due out Friday. The report culled data from a number of sources, including Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, the U.S. Census Bureau and the city’s own statistics. The first report, which took seven years to compile, was released in 2002. In the latest Quality of Life Indicators Report, various measures were chosen using community input to compare Glendale to surrounding cities, the state and Los Angeles County.
BUSINESS
By Zain Shauk | February 23, 2010
DOWNTOWN — Four restaurants have failed since the start of the year on a two-block stretch of the city’s retail core — an area that has drawn the attention of redevelopment officials hoping to stop a trend of closures. The closed restaurants include Baja Fresh Mexican Grill and Daphne’s Greek Cafe at the Glendale Marketplace and Tofu Village and Dolci Mango at the Exchange on Maryland. The now-empty storefronts add to major vacancies left behind by restaurants and large retailers like Circuit City and Linens N’ Things at the two shopping centers, which account for more than 260,000 of the city center’s 2.1 million square feet of retail space.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | June 28, 2009
CITY HALL — Major renovations to one of the city’s oldest parks should begin this fall if the City Council on Tuesday approves the final concept plan for Griffith Manor Park. Acquired in 1937, the 3-acre park near the San Fernando Corridor is one of the city’s oldest public facilities and hasn’t undergone a major renovation since the early 1970s. The City Council, acting as the Redevelopment Agency on Tuesday, is scheduled to review a concept plan featuring a 2,400-square-foot community building, new restrooms, lights, irrigation systems, a lighted basketball court, benches and picnic pavilions, a new “splash pad” children’s water play area and an expanded parking lot and playground.
NEWS
January 18, 2008
A contingency fund of $100,000 to cover extra, unforeseen costs for the replacement of the adult recreation center was approved Tuesday. The City Council approved the $10.5-million rebuild of the center in 2006, and since then, several changes have been proposed to the site plan that are expected to total at least $68,000. Architects for the project hope to secure final approval of the project’s building plans this month. The project will put a new adult recreation center — which houses the lion’s share of the city’s seniors programs — near the corner of Louise and Colorado streets and eliminate Central Park’s four tennis courts.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | June 30, 2009
CITY HALL — A multimillion-dollar contract to operate the city’s four central parking garages comes back to the City Council dais tonight after a protracted bidding war that has drawn accusations of bias and unfair competition. After challenging the city’s initial attempt to contract with a new vendor, Parking Concepts Inc., the firm that has operated the garages for the last 11 years, came in with the lowest bid at $5.3 million for the three-year contract. Last summer, the City Council voted to negotiate exclusively with Los Angeles-based Modern Parking Inc. on a proposed $5.75-million contract after it submitted the lowest of six bids.
NEWS
By Yasmin Nouh | July 2, 2009
GLENDALE — While the amount of trash littering Glendale’s sidewalks and public areas remains fairly low overall, more of it gets left behind along the city’s busiest roadways and in the southern region, according to the latest survey. In a report to the Committee for a Clean & Beautiful Glendale on Thursday, Neighborhood Services officials found that, on a scale of 1 to 4 — with 1 reserved for “no litter” and 4 assigned to “extremely littered” — Glendale registered an overall grade of 1.52, mirroring the score for 2008.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | April 18, 2014
Glendale's ongoing issues with pedestrian safety have claimed the lives of two 86-year-old men just within the past four months. The figure is specifically distressing to Daniel Mehrabian because his grandfather was one of those men killed. "I wasn't ready to lose him," he said. Determined to find answers as to why pedestrians, particularly seniors, are being killed by vehicles in Glendale, Mehrabian sat down with community stakeholders Thursday night at the highly-anticipated UC Berkeley pedestrian workshop to discuss the city's enduring traffic safety problem.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine | April 17, 2014
Lolita Gonzalves used to think of Councilman Dave Weaver as a father figure, but that was before she filed a complaint with Glendale's city attorney alleging that he groped her at a Mexican restaurant last year. Gonzalves has spoken to Los Angeles County District Attorney officials about the incident and attorneys for Gonzalves and Weaver have been negotiating a settlement to prevent a civil lawsuit. Weaver, who ended his one-year term as mayor last week, had last offered $2,000.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Good morning, readers. Today is Wednesday, April 16. Forecasters predict the high will be 75 and low 54 in the Glendale region. The top headlines in your area this morning : Attorneys for the city of Glendale asked a federal judge last week to dismiss a lawsuit filed against the city that calls for the removal of a local statue honoring women forced to work as sex slaves for the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II. ...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 15, 2014
For the second week in a row, city officials have postponed a free self-defense class for women as the city attorney continues to review the legality of the gender-exclusive classes. The city and its Commission on the Status of Women host the popular classes annually in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, but a letter sent by the National Coalition for Men questioning the classes' legality because they exclude men and boys prompted officials to put them on hold. The coalition, which was founded in 1977, claimed in its March 13 letter that barring men from the free self-defense training on public property violates equal-protection clauses of the state and federal constitutions.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 15, 2014
After receiving 18,000 comments, the California Department of Public Health on Tuesday recommended setting the maximum limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, bringing the new cap on the pollutant that has plagued Glendale water for decades one step closer to finalization. The recommendation is expected to be approved within 30 days by an administrative arm of the state government, known as the Office of Administrative Law, according to a statement released by the public health department.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 14, 2014
Attorneys for the city of Glendale asked a federal judge last week to dismiss a lawsuit filed against the city that calls for the removal of a local statue honoring women forced to work as sex slaves for the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II. The request is the latest development in the controversial saga related to the so-called “comfort women” monument since Glendale installed the 1,100-pound, bronze memorial in Central Park in...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 11, 2014
City officials aim to increase the life of the 535-acre Scholl Canyon Landfill - both a moneymaker and money saver for Glendale - by more than a decade with two proposed expansion options that are currently under environmental review. The first option involves an approximately 11.5-million-cubic-yard horizontal expansion that would add 13 years to the landfill's life, while the second includes both horizontal and vertical extensions equaling about 16.5 million cubic yards, increasing the landfill's life by 19 years, according to the project's draft environmental impact report.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 3, 2014
From the booming downtown development scene to new retailers at the Americana at Brand and Glendale Galleria, there are plenty of positives to highlight in Glendale, but there are also looming problems that could take the wind out of the city's sails, Mayor Dave Weaver said at the annual State of the City luncheon Thursday. Weaver was referring to two separate lawsuits aiming to end the annual transfer of tens of millions of dollars from Glendale Water & Power to the city's General Fund that pays for police and other general services as well as a proposed ballot measure to repeal the utility users tax, which also supports the General Fund.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 2, 2014
A consultant is set to be paid $130,000 to fix Glendale's broken water rates following City Council's approval this week. That's on top of about $50,000 the city already paid Berkeley-based Bartle Wells for an initial analysis of the miscalculated rates. The new contract with Bartle Wells was necessary because the consultant has to completely scrap the former water rates, which had numerous errors , and conduct a new cost-of-service analysis, said Steve Zurn, director of Glendale Water & Power, during a council meeting Tuesday.
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