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NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | May 12, 2011
This year marks the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War, a conflict that raged for four years. After the war, many veterans moved West to start a new life, and that movement will be highlighted May 21 at “From War to Reconciliation — Moving On and Moving West” at Crescenta Valley Park. Organized by the Crescenta Valley and Little Landers historical societies, the living history presentation will introduce some of those Civil War veterans who came West. One of them is Henry Mingay, who settled in Glendale.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | April 12, 2012
What do the Civil War, a veteran named Henry Mingay and Glendale have in common? The Civil War was one of the first times in history that men from different areas came together to fight the enemy. In previous conflicts, members of a fighting unit came from one community, and when the survivors returned from battle they helped take care of each other. But by the end of the Civil War, units were made up of soldiers from many places, according to the website Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, www.suvcw.org.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | April 10, 2008
A man in a top hat with more than a passing likeness to Abraham Lincoln stood on the athletic field behind Toll Middle School on Wednesday and related some of the key points of the former president’s life to a group of eighth-graders from the school. “I’m here to tell you about the Civil War and what I accomplished while I was president,” said the Lincoln reenactor, who was played by J.P. Wammack, whose children went through the Glendale Unified School District.
FEATURES
By Robin Goldsworthy | June 8, 2007
The Rosemont Middle School cafeteria was transformed into a time machine on Thursday evening, May 31 as students in Stacy Fox's eighth grade history classes presented their Civil War research projects. Students' families and friends were invited for the presentations which included in depth information on subjects such as Civil War medicine, weapon technology and prison systems. The event was the brainchild of Fox, who adapted the idea from "Math Night," an evening spotlighting mathematics that used to be held at the school.
NEWS
April 30, 2005
Darleene Barrientos Using words, songs and clothes rather than the usual cannons and rifles, eighth-grade students at Rosemont Middle School got a realistic picture of life in the mid-1800s and at the horror of the Civil War. Students participated in the fifth annual Civil War program, taking turns at seven stations to hear teachers and members of the community speak for 12 minutes as historical figures from that...
NEWS
April 30, 2003
Ryan Carter Students plugged their ears Tuesday as booming cannon fire rumbled through the air at Rosemont Middle School. As the ringing subsided, the sounds of a banjo echoed in the gym, where Abraham Lincoln sat tapping his toes alongside some eighth-graders. Images of the Civil War swept through the school as actors introduced students to weapons, music, culture and clothing of the early 1860s. Three million people from the northern and southern states clashed over power and slavery, and more than 600,000 died in the war. "It was nice to get detail you might not get in books," said Meagan Denos, 14. "It really gives us an inside story."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2007
Forest Lawn-Glendale is celebrating the 92nd anniversary of its first Memorial Day program. The event will be held on May 28, beginning at 1 p.m., and will feature a memorial march at the Little Church of the Flowers and proceed to the burial site of a Civil War soldier. Civil War re-enactors from the 100th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry-Company K will be featured. A civil war band, The Band of the California Battalion, will supply patriotic music. Amusket and cannon salute will complete the event.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | May 5, 2007
As about 30 eighth-grade Rosemont Middle School students settled into their chairs Thursday, Abraham Lincoln prepared them for what they were about to hear. "I'm here to talk about how I got shot," he said. Lincoln, played by school history teacher Mike Anker, then launched into the story of how the 16th U.S. president came to pull the country through its bloodiest fight — the Civil War. Anker was one of six teachers and community members who had stations set up around the school's soccer field for most of the day as about 700 eighth-graders moved from one character to the next for an up-close and personal take on the war. Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, a Union soldier, a housewife, a social director and field doctor Mary Edward Walker — the only woman ever to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor — were also out on the field.
NEWS
July 5, 2002
major one It is a pity that Mr. Shelton tries to teach cause and effect, because he doesn't seem to know the first thing about these concepts. I don't know if I can help him learn, but I will try. First of all, the Civil War, like any event of comparable magnitude and complexity, had many causes. The split between the North and the South goes back to the very beginning of our nation as a nation, and interestingly enough, this first dispute was about slavery.
NEWS
July 1, 2002
The erudite Ms. Todd's letter regarding the causes of the Civil War was a fascinating view of how history can be revised and rewritten by anyone with an agenda. Clearly, Todd's agenda was to "prove" that slavery had no relationship to the Civil War whatsoever, beyond being used as a propaganda tool by evil Northern politicians, the better to elevate the venerable Lee. What nonsense! That the causes of the Civil War were multitudinous, as with any war, really, is beyond debate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 15, 2013
The first time that I saw the sign advertising a gun show in the Glendale Civic Auditorium, for a fleeting moment I thought I was somewhere in rural Alabama. How embarrassing, in this 21st century, to have such activities in a civilized country. How embarrassing, sad and degrading to have a debate as to whether or not everyone should carry guns, machine guns and other weaponry in order to “protect” ourselves and our families and children from our own government and a variety of well-armed, deranged homicidal evildoers.
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NEWS
May 26, 2012
One of my earliest memories dates to my fourth birthday, when it seemed like the whole world was celebrating with me. The whole world was indeed celebrating, but it had nothing to do with me. It was May 7, 1945, the day the Germans unconditionally surrendered, the day before victory in Europe became official. From the Soviet Union to America, vast throngs of people took to the streets to rejoice in that moment of triumph. Three months later, the Japanese surrendered, setting off more celebrations.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | April 12, 2012
What do the Civil War, a veteran named Henry Mingay and Glendale have in common? The Civil War was one of the first times in history that men from different areas came together to fight the enemy. In previous conflicts, members of a fighting unit came from one community, and when the survivors returned from battle they helped take care of each other. But by the end of the Civil War, units were made up of soldiers from many places, according to the website Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, www.suvcw.org.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 31, 2011
Grand View Memorial Park had only been open for an hour on Sunday and had already welcomed 40 cars of people eager to visit tombstones of loved ones at the cemetery. The cemetery has entered negotiations with three prospective buyers. A newly installed irrigation system has turned its dry grass green and 20 volunteers have begun working at the cemetery, allowing the park to regularly open for visitors every Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. On Saturday, Boy Scouts from the Verdugo Hills Council placed American flags on the graves of veterans to commemorate Memorial Day. The tradition of school children placing flags on the graves of veterans at the cemetery dates to 1906, said Lisa Burks, a volunteer.
NEWS
By Katherine Yamada | May 12, 2011
This year marks the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War, a conflict that raged for four years. After the war, many veterans moved West to start a new life, and that movement will be highlighted May 21 at “From War to Reconciliation — Moving On and Moving West” at Crescenta Valley Park. Organized by the Crescenta Valley and Little Landers historical societies, the living history presentation will introduce some of those Civil War veterans who came West. One of them is Henry Mingay, who settled in Glendale.
NEWS
By Pat Grant | November 10, 2010
The quaint lakeside township of Benzonia is the birthplace of noted civil war historian Bruce Catton. His favorite place to write was a summer home perched on a bluff overlooking the sparkling waters of Crystal Lake. A glance to the north offered a spectacular panorama of Lake Michigan, wooded hills and sandy bluffs. Catton's interest in the Civil War was inspired by the presence of Grand Army of the Republic veterans, whose faded blue uniforms, bedecked with medals, were the center of attraction at local patriotic celebrations.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | June 4, 2010
A braham Lincoln reminded 35 fifth-graders at Incarnation Parish School on Thursday that with hard work, not only could they be future presidents, but history might celebrate them forever. For the 54th time this year, J.P. Wammack, a La Cañada Flintridge resident and Civil War buff, recalled the life, presidency and death of the 16th president. "I had one overriding ambition, and that was to maintain the Union," he said. "In America, any man could do any job he set out to do and I wanted that to continue forever."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2009
TODAY Montrose -Verdugo City Chamber of Commerce and Montrose Shopping Park Assn. remember ?Brave Veterans, Past and Present? at a Memorial Day tribute from 8 to 9 a.m. at the Vietnam War Memorial in the Montrose Shopping Center, 2300 Honolulu Ave., Glendale. For more information, call (818) 249-7171. ? The Glendale Chamber of Commerce Patriotism Committee and city of Glendale present the annual Glendale Memorial Day Ceremony at 9:30 a.m. in front of the Glendale Veterans Memorial, which stands near City Hall on the corner of Isabel Street and East Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009
ACTIVITIES Night Walk at Descanso Gardens — May 22 at 7:15 p.m. Docent Jim Jackson and wife Joanne lead an enchanted evening walk that covers botanical and historical highlights along with flora and fauna of the night. Participants must be at least 12 years old. Wear sensible shoes and bring a jacket and flashlight. Space is limited so early registration is recommended. Cost per person for the night walk is $15, $10 Descanso members. To register, call (818) 949-7980.
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