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Clara Barton Award

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By Yasmin Nouh | August 27, 2009
Charles Mason could be considered a self-made man. When he was 10, his mother died of heart failure and his father had already left the family, leaving Mason and his two older sisters orphaned in Noblesville, Ind., a town of 9,000 people. Their neighbor, Myrtle Cosgrove, took the three children in for four years. She had lost her husband six months prior. ?A lot of friends and neighbors came and helped me,? Mason said. That experience colored the way Mason lived, he said, proving to him that it is better to give than to receive.
NEWS
May 29, 2002
Janine Marnien GLENDALE -- The Glendale-Crescenta Valley Red Cross Chapter has seen many natural disasters during its 85 years, including the Montrose flood in 1924 and Glendale's College Hills Fire in 1990. The chapter on will celebrate 85 years on Wednesday, June 5, at the Oakmont Country Club during its annual meeting. But the efforts of the chapter -- whether it's providing families with food, clothing, shelter or emergency information -- wouldn't be possible without the help of the community it serves, said Val Douglas, chairwoman of volunteers.
FEATURES
By Ani Amirkhanian | June 28, 2007
Carolyn Gillis always knew she wanted to donate her time to help with the relief effort after Sept. 11, 2001. When Gillis learned that the American Red Cross needed volunteers, she turned to the local Glendale-Crescenta Chapter. "I knew as of Sept. 11 they needed bodies," Gillis, 64, said. "The state of preparedness was a concern on everybody's mind." She started volunteering for the organization's fundraising events until she discovered that she could put her writing, editing and design skills to good use. Gillis took on the task of writing and designing Red Cross fliers, brochures, thank-you letters and programs.
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By Yasmin Nouh | August 27, 2009
Charles Mason could be considered a self-made man. When he was 10, his mother died of heart failure and his father had already left the family, leaving Mason and his two older sisters orphaned in Noblesville, Ind., a town of 9,000 people. Their neighbor, Myrtle Cosgrove, took the three children in for four years. She had lost her husband six months prior. ?A lot of friends and neighbors came and helped me,? Mason said. That experience colored the way Mason lived, he said, proving to him that it is better to give than to receive.
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