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Clark Magnet High School

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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 1, 2013
Billionaire Richard Branson may have been celebrating the next step in his quest to make commercial space flights viable this week, but students at Clark Magnet High School also have been busy at work analyzing their own near-space flight. The students launched a high-altitude balloon that reached 85,000 feet over the Angeles National Forest Sunday to collect photos and video from near-space. "Launching a high-altitude balloon is about 99% the same as going to space, and it's as close as you can get without a very expensive, massive rocket," said Clark teacher David Black, who oversaw the launch.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | October 4, 2013
Through a happy accident involving a pair of high-attitude balloons, Clark Magnet High School students have detailed images of the mountains charred by the 2009 Station Fire, allowing them to study how well the area is recovering. The group, working with robotics and engineering teacher David Black, is chasing a $10,000 prize awarded by the Lexus Eco Challenge by studying how invasive plant species put down roots in the wake of forest fires. Team 696, the school's robotics team, will tap into data collected by cameras on high-altitude balloons Clark students launched in 2012 and 2013 that captured photographs of the mountains from a distance.
FEATURES
August 29, 2008
Clark Magnet High School students are getting ready to return to school. Teachers and administrators are having their staff meetings and getting their classrooms ready for another successful year. Clark is a magnet school with a United Nations type of feel, where each area of Glendale and Crescenta Valley is represented. Eighth grade students who are interested in attending Clark place their name in a lottery-type system. The only criteria is that you live within the Glendale Unified School District.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
Glendale Unified School District will have a lottery Thursday to select students entering Clark Magnet High School. The selection begins at 9 a.m. in the district administrative offices, 223 N. Jackson St., Room 203. The lottery is open to the public. The lottery is necessary because the number of applicants to Clark has exceeded the number of spaces available. About 500 applications were submitted for 300 spaces. Each student's name drawn will be assigned a number and a waiting list will be established.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 2, 2014
On a typical morning at the beginning of this school year, a bus known as "Bus 106" carrying dozens of students to Clark Magnet High School from Glendale was late to school again. So, Barbara Melone, then senior administrative secretary at the school, made an announcement she had grown used to making, often in her disgruntled, irritated or sarcastic tone. "Bus 106 has just arrived," she told the entire student body over the school's intercom. Then, only to her colleagues in the school's front office, she joked, "I'm going to put 'Bus 106 has just arrived' on my tombstone.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 29, 2014
After Phiona Mutesi lost her father to AIDS when she was 3 years old, she grew accustomed to always feeling hungry and searching for food in one of the world's worst slums. When she was 9 years old, she followed her brother to where she had heard porridge was promised to her and other children in the Katwe slum of Uganda. When she arrived, she saw the other children playing chess in a program established by Sports Outreach Institute, a Christian ministry that offers sports programs in areas around the world affected by war or poverty.
NEWS
By Arin Mikailian, arin.mikailian@latimes.com | March 27, 2014
Students from Clark Magnet High School emerged as the winners of this year's Smart-a-Thon, a trivia tournament and fundraiser put on by the Crescenta Valley Chamber of Commerce. Thirty-four sponsored teams of four people each representing local businesses, schools and government offices went head to head once again at the Verdugo Hills Hospital Wednesday to see if they knew what was Idaho's nickname or how many different five-card poker hands could be dealt from a 52-card deck. "It's kind of a bragging rights-type thing to win … it's just fun that way, but everyone kind of takes it seriously," said Steve Pierce, chamber president and business ambassador for the Montrose Shopping Park Assn.
NEWS
By Joylene Wagner | January 24, 2014
If education guru Dr. Bill Daggett had his way, the declared goal of the Common Core curriculum would be to prepare students to be career-ready. As he told Glendale teachers last August, the push for “college-and-career-ready” standards came from the higher education contingent among the many representatives who came together to develop the Common Core. In the end, “college and career” won out. I think I understand Daggett's frustration at the dual goal. After all, isn't all education, K-12 through college and graduate school, designed to prepare students for life beyond school?
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | December 13, 2013
Two groups of students at Clark Magnet High School are each in the running to win $30,000 after successfully beating more than 30 other teams at high schools across the western region in an environmental studies competition. As part of the Lexus Eco Challenge, one team looked at how land devastated by the Station Fire is recovering and the other studied the effects of acid rain. After collecting data from two high-altitude balloons students launched in 2012 and earlier this year, Team 696 captured images taken thousands of miles above the Angeles National Forest, including the more than 160,000 acres burned in the Station Fire.
NEWS
By Emily Foxhall, emily.foxhall@latimes.com | December 9, 2013
Eleven years ago, a student graduating from Clark Magnet High School harbored a slight interest in the military. Now, that student's military interest has blossomed and she is set to start flying Black Hawk helicopters for the Army. In a case of changing and pursued passions, Meghedie “Meg” Dersarkissian, 29, will graduate from Army Aviation School in Alabama on Dec. 19. “I've always loved the idea of rescue,” said Dersarkissian, who, while deployed in Afghanistan for the Air Force, still thought she still might pursue a career as a veterinarian.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | November 10, 2013
Over the next three years, Clark Magnet High School students will document the debris plaguing the marine life off the California coast with help from a $99,767 grant they recently received from State Farm. Clark Magnet teacher Dominique Evans-Bye, who will advise the students on the project, has traveled with them to the Pacific Ocean three times over the summer where they documented debris such as fishing lines, plastics and nets that pose a hazard to birds, fish, whales and dolphins.
NEWS
By Joylene Wagner | October 19, 2013
The event was just a practice-round Lego robotics competition for elementary and middle school students, held at Roosevelt Middle School as a way to introduce new teams to how such competitions work. Nonetheless it was a model of how schools can integrate science, technology, engineering and mathematics - often called STEM - into instruction. Much of what education and business leaders have called central to improving education and preserving America's leadership in the world was in evidence at Roosevelt last week.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | October 4, 2013
Through a happy accident involving a pair of high-attitude balloons, Clark Magnet High School students have detailed images of the mountains charred by the 2009 Station Fire, allowing them to study how well the area is recovering. The group, working with robotics and engineering teacher David Black, is chasing a $10,000 prize awarded by the Lexus Eco Challenge by studying how invasive plant species put down roots in the wake of forest fires. Team 696, the school's robotics team, will tap into data collected by cameras on high-altitude balloons Clark students launched in 2012 and 2013 that captured photographs of the mountains from a distance.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 27, 2013
Student response to a decision by the Glendale Unified school board to hire a company to monitor students' public posts on social networks has been mixed. The board approved the year-long $40,500 contract with Geo Listening earlier this month to analyze posts on Twitter and elsewhere made by the district's middle and high school students. The company will provide officials with a daily report about how those posts relate to cyber-bullying, substance abuse, truancy, violence or possible suicide attempts.
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