Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsCold War
IN THE NEWS

Cold War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 15, 2003
ADAM SCHIFF Much has changed since the end of the Cold War that augurs well for the survival of our nation. Most significant, the prospect of mutually assured destruction in a nuclear exchange with a foreign power has receded into the background of the last century. The new century has brought on its own terrible dangers, which although not reaching the apocalyptic potential of the Cold War, still have the capacity to shake our world. In an effort to address the national security needs of America in this new environment, my colleagues Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2006
It's 1961, and somewhere behind the Iron Curtain a family from Newark, N.J. has found refuge in an American Embassy. "Don't Drink the Water," a Woody Allen comedy, looks at the Cold War through the eyes of a not-so-typical American family who simply wanted a nice vacation in a Communist country. What they got was an international incident. With the help of a nun who is a practicing magician and a bungling assistant ambassador, the innocent tourists must find a way to escape from behind the Iron Curtain.
NEWS
September 27, 2003
The News-Press is commended for publishing Congressman Adam Schiff's 10 principles of national security after the Cold War. Adam's perceptive blueprint of the post-war principles that will provide this great nation with security, dignity, honor, and stability are statesmanlike, courageous, reflect the reality of the world that we inhabit, and will cause us to think beyond the here and now. Adam is a young congressman...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006
Crescenta Valley High School Drama Department presents Woody Allen's "Don't Drink The Water" at 7 p.m. on Feb. 23, 24 and 25 the CVHS drama room. The comedy takes place in 1961 at the height of the Cold War. A New Jersey family traveling behind the Iron Curtain take what they think are innocent photographs, throwing them into a international spy scandal. They find refuge in an American Embassy where a bungling Ambassador's son is in charge. They work on escaping with the help of a nun, who does magic tricks as a hobby, and is always under the watchful eye of the Communist police.
NEWS
November 24, 2000
Aykut Berk These days, some circles have conspicuously stepped up their nefarious propaganda to use Turkey as their scapegoat just to evade facing their own history. Unlike its accusing "friends," Turkey has nothing in its past to be ashamed of, and it will never succumb to these abominable attempts under any circumstances. No one can cure its own historical trauma by one-sidedly targeting another nation's past. If we are supposed to settle all the accounts pertaining to history, before questioning others, everyone needs to take a closer look into what its own past deeds say. To evaluate a historical incident honestly, we also have to look into the whole truth, including all the aspects, not by selecting and reproducing unsubstantiated claims of the favorite ones.
NEWS
By PATRICK AZADIAN | July 15, 2006
The cold war is over. Isn't it? And yet for many of the ethnics across America, the war continues to rage, even after the destruction of the Berlin Wall. Don't be alarmed. I don't mean to suggest there are many communist sympathizers living here in America waiting to setup a worker's dictatorship in Washington, D.C. No, absolutely not. One would be hard-pressed to even find outspoken liberals in today's political environment, let alone leftist radicals who still cling onto the notion that somehow the now-defunct Soviet system was actually better than the variety of systems offered in the Western hemisphere.
FEATURES
By Theodore Polychronis | May 19, 2006
In a rebuttal to the many statements made in remembrance of the Armenian genocide and holocaust in the hands of the Turks in 1915, the Glendale News-Press printed two letters on April 27. One letter, "Don't forget that Turkey is an ally," by a self-proclaimed "American," states that, in spite of the "anti-Turkish feeling," Turkey is a friend and without her the free world would be part of the Soviet Union today. The other letter, "Reasons for injustice must be publicized," asks whether or not the Armenians somehow incited the Turks to commit genocide against them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | May 29, 2010
F ormer Secretary of the Navy Paul R. Ignatius will talk about his experiences working with President John F. Kennedy and his military service when he is the featured speaker at two Memorial Day events in Glendale. Ignatius grew up in Glendale and graduated from Hoover High School in 1938. He graduated with honors and Phi Beta Kappa membership from USC in 1942. "I went into the Navy for four years, and most of my service was on an aircraft carrier," he said. He achieved the rank of lieutenant and also performed assignments in Washington, D.C. Following his military service, he received a master's degree in business administration from Harvard Business School in 1947.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | November 8, 2013
The cold war is over, and yet there are way more apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic movies being made now than during the fearful '50s. In the last decade, we've had “The Road,” “Seeking a Friend for the End of the World,” “Time of the Wolf,” “2012” and innumerable action epics built around the end of the world. “How I Live Now” shows up with a classy pedigree: director Kevin Macdonald (“The Last King of Scotland”) and writer Tony Grisoni (“Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” “Queen of Hearts”)
Advertisement
NEWS
May 26, 2012
One of my earliest memories dates to my fourth birthday, when it seemed like the whole world was celebrating with me. The whole world was indeed celebrating, but it had nothing to do with me. It was May 7, 1945, the day the Germans unconditionally surrendered, the day before victory in Europe became official. From the Soviet Union to America, vast throngs of people took to the streets to rejoice in that moment of triumph. Three months later, the Japanese surrendered, setting off more celebrations.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 2, 2011
The Geopolitics Club at Clark Magnet High School had their second chat last week with Sergei Khrushchev, son of the late Nikita Khrushchev, who led the Soviet Union from 1955 to 1964. The high school students were dressed up for the occasion in suits, ties and dresses as they spoke with Khrushchev in a video call using Skype. The club approached cinema teacher Matt Stroup to ask if Stroup could connect Khrushchev on a conference earlier this year. Club president Grigori Grigoryan sent an email to Khrushchev’s university email account after learning he was a professor at Brown University, where he has worked since 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | May 29, 2010
F ormer Secretary of the Navy Paul R. Ignatius will talk about his experiences working with President John F. Kennedy and his military service when he is the featured speaker at two Memorial Day events in Glendale. Ignatius grew up in Glendale and graduated from Hoover High School in 1938. He graduated with honors and Phi Beta Kappa membership from USC in 1942. "I went into the Navy for four years, and most of my service was on an aircraft carrier," he said. He achieved the rank of lieutenant and also performed assignments in Washington, D.C. Following his military service, he received a master's degree in business administration from Harvard Business School in 1947.
FEATURES
May 26, 2007
W ith Memorial Day upon us, we are a nation at war. If you could give a Memorial Day message, what would it be? As we observe this solemn day, we must remember all the brave men and women in uniform who gave their lives in the service of our country. Today, we are once again a nation at war — and sadly, the conflict in Iraq seems to have no clear end in sight. We find ourselves locked in fierce debate over the war's legitimacy, with the American people sharply divided between supporters and opponents.
NEWS
By Joe Puglia | February 16, 2007
I was sitting with the family around the kitchen table trying my best to run interference on this crazy, fandangled idea about us going on a skiing trip. I'm thinking, maybe if I run the dishwasher the noise will squelch this nonsensical talk and we can then get on with our day. With ballet and Holy Communion classes, it's not like we don't have enough to do. Well, this skiing idea began to pick up momentum and even the din of the dishwasher could not quell the excitement of Sabine and Simone.
NEWS
By PATRICK AZADIAN | July 15, 2006
The cold war is over. Isn't it? And yet for many of the ethnics across America, the war continues to rage, even after the destruction of the Berlin Wall. Don't be alarmed. I don't mean to suggest there are many communist sympathizers living here in America waiting to setup a worker's dictatorship in Washington, D.C. No, absolutely not. One would be hard-pressed to even find outspoken liberals in today's political environment, let alone leftist radicals who still cling onto the notion that somehow the now-defunct Soviet system was actually better than the variety of systems offered in the Western hemisphere.
FEATURES
By Theodore Polychronis | May 19, 2006
In a rebuttal to the many statements made in remembrance of the Armenian genocide and holocaust in the hands of the Turks in 1915, the Glendale News-Press printed two letters on April 27. One letter, "Don't forget that Turkey is an ally," by a self-proclaimed "American," states that, in spite of the "anti-Turkish feeling," Turkey is a friend and without her the free world would be part of the Soviet Union today. The other letter, "Reasons for injustice must be publicized," asks whether or not the Armenians somehow incited the Turks to commit genocide against them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006
Crescenta Valley High School Drama Department presents Woody Allen's "Don't Drink The Water" at 7 p.m. on Feb. 23, 24 and 25 the CVHS drama room. The comedy takes place in 1961 at the height of the Cold War. A New Jersey family traveling behind the Iron Curtain take what they think are innocent photographs, throwing them into a international spy scandal. They find refuge in an American Embassy where a bungling Ambassador's son is in charge. They work on escaping with the help of a nun, who does magic tricks as a hobby, and is always under the watchful eye of the Communist police.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2006
It's 1961, and somewhere behind the Iron Curtain a family from Newark, N.J. has found refuge in an American Embassy. "Don't Drink the Water," a Woody Allen comedy, looks at the Cold War through the eyes of a not-so-typical American family who simply wanted a nice vacation in a Communist country. What they got was an international incident. With the help of a nun who is a practicing magician and a bungling assistant ambassador, the innocent tourists must find a way to escape from behind the Iron Curtain.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|