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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Famera | March 7, 2011
When it comes to one-act plays, comedy seems to work best. You put a couple of outrageous characters on stage, have them trade barbs with one another for about 10 minutes, and watch the hilarity ensue. It’s quick. It’s simple. it’s hilarious. The Victory Theatre in Burbank has adapted to this formula quite well with “Rewind,” 10 hilarious one-act plays that are all set in a video store. Through the course of the show, we’re treated to everything from an unlikely in-store birth where the newborn flat out disappears, to a wonderfully choreographed song-and-dance number between the video store clerk and his customers.
NEWS
September 13, 2003
Enjoy some innocent laughs Saturday during "A Night of Clean Stand-Up Comedy," hosted by the Bel Air Presbyterian Church Drama Department. The night will be a live taping of professional comedians Robert G. Lee, Cory Edwards and Nick Arnett's latest comedy videos. The event begins at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at The Alex Theatre. The show will last about 2 1/2 hours with one intermission and is recommended for people 6 and older. Tickets can be purchased for $10 at The Alex Theatre box office at 216 N. Brand Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2007
Fans of Andy Samberg and the TV show "Saturday Night Live" may get a rise from Samberg's first feature film, "Hot Rod." The majority of you should spend your Saturday night elsewhere and wait until this low-flying comedy comes out on DVD or cable. Samberg stars as Rod Kimble, a self-proclaimed stunt man who plans to jump 15 school buses on a motorcycle to raise money for his dying and abusive stepfather, Frank. Rod only wants Frank to get better, so he can fight him one last time and finally win. This is an oddball comedy so I'm not going to dump on the plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phillip Hain | June 11, 2008
Although there is no definitive line between a movie with a large box-office gross and one that is considered to be well made, the dichotomy seems to be more common. ?The Promotion? exemplifies this sad state of filmmaking because it is a fresh, funny comedy that will probably not gain a huge audience or make a lot of money. This is the case where a simple idea is well conceived and executed. Doug Stauber (Seann William Scott) is an assistant manager at a fictional Chicago-area supermarket named Donaldson?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dink O'Neal | January 12, 2011
The St. Francis Stage Company's current staging of "The Sunshine Boys" offers quite a few bright spots for local theatergoers despite some uneven technical aspects. Billed as an annual fundraiser for St. Francis Xavier School and parish, this production of Neil Simon's comedy concerning a pair of former vaudevillian partners features some finely honed leading performances and a first-rate set credited to scenic designer Brad Recker. The bumps in the road occur during what feel like interminable set changes between the scenes that make up each of the show's two acts.
NEWS
By Timothy Rutt, Altadenablog.com | August 8, 2011
San Pedro theater troupe Shakespeare by the Sea concluded its summer in Farnsworth Park Sunday night with the Bard's comedy of love and misunderstandings, "Much Ado About Nothing. " For more photos, go to Altadenablog.com
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2005
If you like the comedy of Sara Silverman, you will enjoy "Sara Silverman: Jesus Is Magic." I can't be anymore clear. All right, I'm done with my review. Enjoy your week. Hold everything ... I can't do that to my ever-expanding audience, so here is my take on this low-budget comedy. "Jesus Is Magic" stars Silverman in a film that intertwines her stand-up show with skits and musical numbers. The title is not a slight on Jesus but a reference to a joke she tells in the movie.
NEWS
October 2, 2002
A ROMANTIC COMEDY WITH GREAT CHARACTERS Tracy Kaufman is an office assistant for the studios and lives in Burbank. "Sweet Home Alabama" is a refreshing romantic comedy that is truly a delight to watch. The engaging cast is lead by Reese Witherspoon as a woman torn between two men, the likable Josh Lucas as her husband and the charming Patrick Dempsey as her fiance. Candice Bergen is wonderfully wicked as Dempsey's mother and mayor of New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Petrillo | April 16, 2008
The Falcon Theatre continues its all-comedy season with the world premiere of David Landsberg’s “An Act of Love.” It’s a uniquely modern comedy surprising for its depth and unpredictability. Landsberg takes a formulaic setup and turns it into something believable and resonant. What starts as the familiar story of a neurotic son barely dealing with his overbearing mother splinters off in several directions almost immediately. Luckily, a seasoned cast of mostly TV veterans keeps the action from veering too far off course.
NEWS
July 21, 2004
Maurice Barnfather Rarely has Glendale Centre Theatre offered a play that is so funny it brings tears to the eyes, like it does here with "Beau Jest." James Sherman's joyous and modern romantic comedy takes a humorous but loving look at Jewish life and the problems of inter-faith relationships. It's one of literature's universal themes -- individuals fighting tradition -- but like a "Seinfeld" situation comedy, the gags come thick and fast in "Beau Jest," producing a kind of comic delirium.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein and By Andy Klein | September 4, 2013
Ernst Lubitsch didn't make merely great movies; he made wonderful movies. His American comedies present a made-up world that show how the world should be. This even applies to his darkest comedy, the 1942 “To Be or Not to Be,” in which the members of a Polish theater company must put aside their monumental egos and insecurities to fool the occupying Nazis. Jack Benny (in handily his best film role) and Carole Lombard (in her last role) play Josef and Maria Tura, the Lunt and Fontanne of Warsaw.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | April 26, 2013
Road pictures come, off the shelf, with an automatic story arc: the characters must get from point A to point B, not just geographically but thematically. More often than not, they end up at a different point B than they had intended or hoped for. The genre is available in three major flavors: person or persons on the run from pursuers (cops, gangsters, or both); unlikely heroes desperately trying to deliver something (like the rare vaccine for a pandemic); romantic comedy odd couple thrown together by chance, then learning how to get along.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | December 30, 2011
Structurally, Roman Polanski's “Carnage” hearkens back to his first feature, “Knife in the Water” (1962). “When a handful of people are stuck in a confined space, the layers of civilized social convention are peeled away, revealing hidden savagery beneath”: that would serve nicely as a TV schedule description of either film. “Knife in the Water” showed a couple and one stranger on a yacht; “Carnage,” two couples in the living room of a New York apartment. The main action here is book-ended by two short scenes in a local park, the first of which sets up the situation: A group of 11-year-olds are having some sort of dispute - we see this from at least a hundred feet away, so it's hard to be sure exactly what's at stake - ending with one of them whacking another on the head with a hockey stick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Klein | December 9, 2011
It was only last year that director Garry Marshall's “Valentine's Day” raked in enough moolah to reach 23 on Box Office Mojo's highest-grossing “romantic comedy” list. That was apparently enough to trigger a follow-up - not, technically, a sequel - so Marshall (“Pretty Woman,” “Young Doctors in Love”) has reteamed with screenwriter Katherine Fugate for “New Year's Eve,” which follows the same template down to the smallest detail: Cast a score of stars in a dozen or so seemingly unrelated stories, all about love in its many forms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terri Martin | August 11, 2011
Steve Melcher, the Emmy Award winning TV writer and producer involved with shows like “Penn and Teller,” “Dennis Miller,” “The Late Show with David Letterman,” and “Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update,” shatters conventional reverence for museum masterworks with tongue in cheek parodies published in his book titled “That is Priceless; Art's Greatest Masterpieces…Made Slightly Funnier.” No iconic artist escapes the author's satirical...
NEWS
By Timothy Rutt, Altadenablog.com | August 8, 2011
San Pedro theater troupe Shakespeare by the Sea concluded its summer in Farnsworth Park Sunday night with the Bard's comedy of love and misunderstandings, "Much Ado About Nothing. " For more photos, go to Altadenablog.com
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Famera | March 7, 2011
When it comes to one-act plays, comedy seems to work best. You put a couple of outrageous characters on stage, have them trade barbs with one another for about 10 minutes, and watch the hilarity ensue. It’s quick. It’s simple. it’s hilarious. The Victory Theatre in Burbank has adapted to this formula quite well with “Rewind,” 10 hilarious one-act plays that are all set in a video store. Through the course of the show, we’re treated to everything from an unlikely in-store birth where the newborn flat out disappears, to a wonderfully choreographed song-and-dance number between the video store clerk and his customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Petrillo | February 18, 2011
It’s surprising how the definition for success in Hollywood has rarely changed over the last century. Whatever their chosen method, each arriving individual yearns to one day make a big important movie that earns universal acclaim, giving them the wealth and confidence to leave their old lives behind. Whether it’s three regular guys named David, Victor and Ben toiling away on a pilot script in some seedy valley apartment, or David O. Selznick, Victor Fleming and Ben Hecht working on the most popular film of all time at Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matt Bellner | February 11, 2011
Everybody deserves a good belly laugh without the hassle or cost of driving to Hollywood. The all-new Flappers Comedy Club in Burbank solves your laughter and dining needs with a unique menu and a spectacular setting where people can witness top-rated comics pushing the envelope for hard-earned chuckles. The night my friends and I went, the featured comic was the star of TV and film, Tom Green. Since Green is in the middle of his World Comedy Tour, he was able to weave in humorous stories about his travels while also poking fun at his current career path of hosting an online talk show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dink O'Neal | January 12, 2011
The St. Francis Stage Company's current staging of "The Sunshine Boys" offers quite a few bright spots for local theatergoers despite some uneven technical aspects. Billed as an annual fundraiser for St. Francis Xavier School and parish, this production of Neil Simon's comedy concerning a pair of former vaudevillian partners features some finely honed leading performances and a first-rate set credited to scenic designer Brad Recker. The bumps in the road occur during what feel like interminable set changes between the scenes that make up each of the show's two acts.
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