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NEWS
May 16, 2002
Mr. Steel notes that the Supreme Court ruled that the internment of U.S. citizens because of their ethnicity was constitutional. Does constitutionality make it right? I think not. The Supreme Court once found slavery and segregation constitutional. This only points out that the Constitution does not necessarily uphold morality. The Constitution's meaning is still argued every year before the Supreme Court. The Constitution allows for pragmatic rationalizations in the context of time and situation.
NEWS
By Dick Seeley | October 2, 2006
About 220 years ago, shortly after the American colonies had won their freedom from the British, it became quite apparent that the Articles of Confederation formulated by the new nation were unworkable as a governing document. So, in 1786, at the instigation of James Madison and Alexander Hamilton, a convention was agreed upon to be held in Philadelphia. A few statesmen such as Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee, refused to attend and serve. But, eventually, despite bad roads, bad weather and a lack of money in some cases, the convention began debate in May, 1787, with members from nine of the colonies present, among them George Washington and Benjamin Franklin.
NEWS
August 23, 2000
Frank Drewe has sent a surprisingly nasty rant about the League of Women Voters, launching a wide attack without much support across many issues. However, I think that Mr. Drewe is more angry that the League of Women Voters does not specifically endorse his views (which he is kind enough to enlighten us with) than he is at their being "partisan" or "nonpartisan." Perhaps I should point out to Mr. Drewe that nonpartisan means voting for who best represents you rather than voting along party lines.
NEWS
By Stephen A. Wells | October 12, 2006
Like John L. Gregg, in his Monday letter, "Commentary on rights missed a few," I appreciated Dick Seeley's Community Commentary on the Constitution, "These are still words to live by," Oct. 2. Gregg is bothered, though, that Seeley "did pick and choose" from the Bill of Rights, implying that the right to bear arms was intentionally omitted, in what Gregg calls "typical, liberal fashion." That's quite a leap, as assumptions go, about liberals in general and Seeley, in particular.
FEATURES
April 24, 2010
Robert Buniatyan had a letter published recently (“Bill takes away freedoms,” March 26) in which he stated his opposition to passage of the health-care-reform legislation. I found the constitutional logic he utilized to be quite interesting. According to Buniatyan, the health-care legislation was unconstitutional in that nowhere in the Constitution is it mentioned that health care is a right. According to his interpretation of the Constitution, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid are all unconstitutional because none of them are mentioned in the Constitution.
NEWS
By Richard Seeley | December 7, 2006
Perhaps we should begin to pay more attention to our Constitution and to where our leaders, on both sides of the aisle, are taking us. We are misinterpreting or just ignoring our Constitution, especially the 5th, 6th and 14th Amendments, either intentionally or otherwise. While terrorism is a reality in this world of ours, it is my opinion that violating or eliminating our rights in the name of security is without merit and is dangerous. Once the rights that honor us with life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are tinkered with or thrown asunder, they are difficult, if not impossible, to reinstate.
NEWS
August 21, 2010
Richard Tafilaw is too late. Burbank is already a transportation hub (“Don’t aspire to be a transportation hub,” Aug. 18). We have two rail lines, two freeways and an airport, and they are not going away. The challenge for the Burbank City Council and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority, as well as state and regional agencies, is to find ways to mitigate the impacts of these essential facilities. The proposed transportation center at the airport does that by making it easier for passengers to use public transportation by bringing together rail, bus and airline services and making the transfer between them more convenient.
NEWS
By DAN KIMBER | October 17, 2008
Over the years I have tried to explain to my students what the framers of our Constitution had in mind when they created the electoral college. For those of you who have struggled to understand why we have the voting system that we do, you might sympathize with youngsters likewise struggling to comprehend it for the first time. Part of my job is to explain how the system works, and invariably when I attempt to do that a discussion follows, the central question being, “Why doesn’t the presidency just go to the person who gets the most votes?
NEWS
August 1, 2003
The letter by Barbara Pallos concerning her jury experience is a testimonial to what appears to be a growing trend with juries that sit on civil cases. One of the greatest safeguards we have as citizens is the right to a jury trial. The right to a jury trial was not originally written into our Constitution. It became part of the Constitution by the Bill of Rights. The reason for including trial by jury in the Constitution was because our founding fathers felt it was one of those important inalienable rights given to all people.
NEWS
March 10, 2004
Ryan Carter Clark Magnet High School government teacher Nick Doom found a topic Tuesday that really got his students talking. It was a proposed amendment to the state Constitution, co-sponsored by Assemblywoman Carol Liu (D-La Canada Flintridge), that would give teens younger than 18 the right to vote in state elections. The idea, called "Training Wheels for Citizenship," was proposed Monday by state Sen. John Vasconcellos (D-Santa Clara) and backed by legislators including Liu, Assemblywoman Sarah Reyes (D-Fresno)
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NEWS
July 2, 2013
It is gratifying that Rep. Schiff praises the end of governmental discrimination against gay Americans in regard to marriage laws - an end in which he had no political role or responsibility in ending. However, in regard to his actual political responsibilities, Rep. Schiff is simply failing. When will Rep. Schiff actually take seriously his oath to “uphold the Constitution against all enemies both foreign and domestic”? Rep. Schiff has not led, or even participated, in the effort to repeal the Patriot Act, the Congressional act passed shortly after 9/11, giving the federal government powers to spy on every American; to create secret courts; to imprison people indefinitely without hearings or trials; to commit acts of covert war without a Congressional declaration of war - all in blatant violation of the American Constitution.
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NEWS
February 14, 2013
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) has introduced a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United, the landmark Supreme Court decision that lifted the ban on direct corporate and union political spending, giving rise to the so-called “super PACs.” Schiff's amendment, announced Thursday, would also overturn the Supreme Court's decision in Arizona Free Enterprise Club's Freedom Club PAC v. Bennett, which struck down a law permitting public financing...
NEWS
December 18, 2012
I have the deepest sorrow for the loss of 20 children and six adults who were gunned down Friday in Newtown, Conn. The Glendale Civic Auditorium is a frequent venue for marketing and sale of firearms that many of us believe contributes to the cycle of deadly violence in our nation. After seeing the images of a small school where 20 young children lay dead, how can we ever sit idle and allow “business as usual” and profit from these gun shows? It is clear that easy access to handguns and semiautomatic rifles is one of the main contributing factors in the number and severity of these unthinkable acts.
NEWS
By Adam Schiff | September 21, 2012
Three months ago, in a decision all but lost in the tumult over the Supreme Court's ruling on the Affordable Care Act, the justices overturned a century-old Montana law that prohibited corporate spending in that state's elections. In the Montana case, the Supreme Court had the chance to revisit its deeply flawed 2010 decision in Citizens United. But despite the urgings of members of the court itself and a public shell-shocked by the recent torrent of unregulated corporate expenditures, the court chose instead to double down and reaffirm the conclusion of Citizens United that corporations are people, at least as far as the First Amendment is concerned.
THE818NOW
October 20, 2011
In light of reports of ousted Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi's death, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) released a statement Thursday calling the news “an end to the first chapter of another popular revolution.” “Now the Libyan people and their new government must begin the hard work of reconciliation and unifying the armed forces and police under civilian control,” he said. “They must draft a new constitution and begin the process of electing a government that will be representative of its people for the first time in decades.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken, melanie.hicken@latimes.com | June 3, 2011
GLENDALE - Los Angeles County transportation officials may have earmarked $6.6 million for safety upgrades to the Doran Street rail crossing, but state officials say they will continue push to have it closed, citing the danger posed by a nearby propane facility. The decision will ultimately lie with the California Public Utilities Commission, which would have to approve the upgrades or any closure of the crossing. Located in Glendale near the Los Angeles border, the Doran Street crossing is considered one of the most dangerous in the Metrolink system because of the constricted intersection, which can leave cars on the tracks, and because of the proximity of an adjacent propane and industrial gas storage facility.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert, max.zimbert@latimes.com | September 20, 2010
A constitution is posted inside and outside Linda Cleverley's fourth-grade classroom at Keppel Elementary School, but this 2010 version one-ups Thomas Jefferson, students said. As a class, students wrote a declaration of their own for their domain — Room 1305. "We the students of Mrs. Cleverley's class, in order to form a more perfect classroom, establish friendship, ensure respect, promote fairness, promote equity and secure a good education for ourselves, do ordain and establish this constitution for the class of 1305.
NEWS
August 21, 2010
Richard Tafilaw is too late. Burbank is already a transportation hub (“Don’t aspire to be a transportation hub,” Aug. 18). We have two rail lines, two freeways and an airport, and they are not going away. The challenge for the Burbank City Council and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority, as well as state and regional agencies, is to find ways to mitigate the impacts of these essential facilities. The proposed transportation center at the airport does that by making it easier for passengers to use public transportation by bringing together rail, bus and airline services and making the transfer between them more convenient.
FEATURES
April 24, 2010
Robert Buniatyan had a letter published recently (“Bill takes away freedoms,” March 26) in which he stated his opposition to passage of the health-care-reform legislation. I found the constitutional logic he utilized to be quite interesting. According to Buniatyan, the health-care legislation was unconstitutional in that nowhere in the Constitution is it mentioned that health care is a right. According to his interpretation of the Constitution, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid are all unconstitutional because none of them are mentioned in the Constitution.
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