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THE818NOW
September 17, 2012
Thousands of Armenian Americans celebrated their native land's independence during a festival at Verdugo Park on Sunday that featured dancing, music and, of course, food. The 14th Annual Armenian Independence Day Festival has gained in popularity over the years, attracting more than 5,000 people throughout the daylong event, organizers said. “We enjoy our dancing, our artists, our famous Armenian kebab and our Armenian ice cream and our famous Armenian pastries,” said Garry Sinanian, a member of the Nor Serount Cultural Assn., which puts on the event each year.
FEATURES
By Robert S. Hong | July 2, 2007
Twenty-five women took the stage before a sellout crowd at the Alex Theatre Saturday for an evening of modeling, entertainment and the crowning of the new Miss Asia USA. In the pageant's 19th year, 19-year-old Katherine Sitseri, who represented Thailand, was ultimately crowned winner of the pageant. "It's very exciting, I didn't expect to win," she said after the pageant. She also encouraged any woman who was interested to pursue in participating in the pageant. "If you really want something, you have to do it," she said.
THE818NOW
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 7, 2012
During the annual Armenian cultural and food festival on Sunday, Osanna Bekarian, 77, and Arsine Aposhian, 72, were making what so many Armenian s have grown up with: hand-braided string cheese. Meanwhile, Nyree Derderian, 38, was lamenting about how similar homemade dishes are less often made at home by younger generations who have grown accustomed to purchasing them at the store. “It takes so much time,” she said. “It's easier to get it at the store.” Bekarian and Aposhian - both La Crescenta residents - are members of the Armenian Relief Society of Western U.S.A., which hosts the festival as a fundraiser for its local and international charities.
NEWS
May 7, 2001
Josh Goldstein GLENDALE -- Practicing steps to the traditional Mexican Folklorico dance, 12-year-old Veronica Cruz was ready to dazzle the audience before going on stage Sunday afternoon, despite some pre-show jitters. While her blue dress represents culture and dances from Northern Mexico, her group's performance was meant for everyone. "It's a unique dance," she said simply. "It's about our culture." Veronica and her Glendale-based Mexican Roots dance club were among the several music and dance groups during the fourth Fiesta Latina festival at Verdugo Park.
NEWS
June 2, 2004
I want to thank the News-Press for publishing Ani Amirkhanian's column each week. I've been waiting 20 years for something like this to bridge the gulf between the Armenian and non-Armenian community. Ms. Amirkhanian's column hits the mark because she grew up here and so is an American in much of her thought and culture, but still Armenian in some of her thought and culture -- and, of course, her heritage. I look forward to each of her insightful columns [every other]
LOCAL
By Robert Phipps | June 7, 2008
The Glendale City Council is reportedly considering passing an ordinance regulating smoking in Glendale’s outdoor public areas, similar to those recently passed in Burbank and other California cities. Will it pass? Well, Armenians have told me it doesn’t have a chance. They say Armenians make up much of Glendale’s population, and smoking is a part of their culture, and there’s no way they’ll let it pass. All countries have cultures, and the United States is no exception.
NEWS
May 10, 2004
Why are we constantly being bombarded with facts having to do with events that happened nearly a century ago in an empire that no longer exists? We all have a past, but let's get on with it, folks. I could write about Glendale's Spanish history and culture, too. But this is 2004, and this is America, and we should embrace American life with American customs. Let's move forward to deal with our current lives, here and now, in the present, moving forward.
NEWS
June 26, 2001
Alecia Foster NORTHEAST GLENDALE -- Unity and diversity -- that's what a group of local women are hoping to accomplish through Shades of Culture, a newly formed women's club. "It's nice to have a place to meet and talk about the issues," said Glendale resident Catherine Yesayan, who helped start the Glendale chapter. Shades of Culture is an expansion of the Pasadena Interracial Women's Club. The club began in 1948 when white and black women in the area began meeting on a regular basis for dinner and friendship, Yesayan said.
NEWS
April 9, 2002
I disagree with Mayor Manoukian, who described Ms. Carrico's words as "words of wisdom." I understand he was trying to be kind, but her words were nothing short of discrimination, and she should apologize. However, I know that there are many in this city that understand what she was trying to say, and this has to be a wake-up call to all of us. To those of us who were here before the Armenians came: What have we done to encourage and help them? Coming to a new country can be a frightening thing.
NEWS
May 1, 2002
I watched the City Council meeting (April 23) and was struck by the irony of the many people who stood up to speak only to need an interpreter to tell us what they were saying. One man told us, through the interpreter, that he had lived in Glendale for 23 years! This man did not speak one word of English. I am all for respecting one's heritage, but if you are going to live in America, it behooves you to make some effort to assimilate into the culture, at the very least learn some of the language.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 17, 2014
Glendale arts and culture officials agreed to discuss spending $30,000 Thursday on projects currently outside their scope of work, such as video exhibits and projections in public spaces as well as a photography street exhibit. The move marked another instance where the Arts & Culture Commission showed a willingness to entertain unique proposals. The commission, which has roughly $1.4 million in funding from development fees, recently supported murals on utility boxes and arts in the windows of vacant storefronts.
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NEWS
By Ray Richmond | December 7, 2013
If there's one thing we have already learned this holiday season, it's that we want our gratification instantly or not at all. Ordering stuff off of the Internet is now a contest to see who can deliver it to us the quickest and cheapest. Ground shipping? Get out of town, pal. Two-day? So 2009. Even overnight shipping isn't really quite cutting it anymore. That's, like, as many as 24 hours, and we can only sleep for eight of those. What are we supposed to do with the other 16? However, we have good news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynne Heffley | November 22, 2013
Charles Phoenix, humorist, author, food-crafter and gleeful guide to pop culture at its kitschiest and most off-beat, will serve up his one-of-a-kind look at mid-20th century building design in “Charles Phoenix: Architecture in LA!” on Sunday at Art Center College of Design's Ahmanson Auditorium in Pasadena. The show, presented in Phoenix's signature, “histo-tainment,” retro slide-show style, is part of an architecture-themed lecture series hosted by Friends of the Gamble House, the support organization for the 1908 Arts and Crafts-style Gamble House in Pasadena, designed by Charles and Henry Greene.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
About 40 parents of Crescenta Valley High School students turned out for a special meeting called this week after Principal Michele Doll announced she had been promoted to a GUSD administrative post. These concerned parents took great advantage of the chance offered them to tell Supt. Dick Sheehan what they hoped to see in a new principal for one of the district's highest-achieving campuses. Especially given the fact that this meeting was held on a weekday evening, after parents had presumably already put in a full day's work, this was an impressive demonstration of just how serious the folks living in the Crescenta Valley are about the educational environment offered their offspring.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | April 26, 2013
A move that could block a residential development on the Verdugo Hills Golf Course hit a stumbling block last week when the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission voted unanimously to recommend it not be made a Historic-Cultural Monument. More than a dozen speakers voiced support for the nomination - both Sunland-Tujunga locals and descendants of Japanese-Americans who had been interned at the Tuna Canyon Detention Station, which was located on the site during World War II. However, the commissioners ruled that because all historic buildings and structures were demolished in 1960, the site, which is a Crescenta Valley resource, didn't qualify.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 15, 2013
Murals, performing arts programs and lighting upgrades to the Civic Auditorium to showcase art exhibits are among the top priorities for city commissioners who are trying to reshape Glendale as a public arts draw. The Arts & Culture Commission met this week to start strategizing after the City Council on Tuesday unanimously supported a five-year plan to transform Glendale into a popular arts destination, not unlike Pasadena and Santa Monica. “We're on our way with this,” Mayor Frank Quintero said.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 14, 2013
The next hip residential complex in Glendale may be stationed on YMCA property. The City Council, acting in its dual role as the Housing Authority, approved a plan to turn about one acre of land owned by the YMCA into an apartment complex focused on attracting arts and entertainment lovers. Glendale and YMCA officials plan to work together to attract a developer to build the facility at 140 N. Louise St. Those projects with arts components, such as a gallery, or a willingness to partner with the YMCA on joint programming are preferred.
THE818NOW
October 5, 2012
Fern Dell, a garden oasis of ferns, trees and picturesque bridges in Griffith Park, was selected Thursday as one of 14 historic American landscapes in urgent need of preservation. The Cultural Landscape Foundation, a Washington nonprofit that aims to increase awareness of historic landscapes, made the selection as part of an annual program to draw immediate attention to valuable but threatened spaces. Other California landscapes selected were Jack London Lake in Glen Ellen and the Hannah Carter Japanese Garden in Los Angeles.
THE818NOW
September 17, 2012
Thousands of Armenian Americans celebrated their native land's independence during a festival at Verdugo Park on Sunday that featured dancing, music and, of course, food. The 14th Annual Armenian Independence Day Festival has gained in popularity over the years, attracting more than 5,000 people throughout the daylong event, organizers said. “We enjoy our dancing, our artists, our famous Armenian kebab and our Armenian ice cream and our famous Armenian pastries,” said Garry Sinanian, a member of the Nor Serount Cultural Assn., which puts on the event each year.
NEWS
August 20, 2012
Armenian and Korean immigrant communities have been living side by side in the pockets of Los Angeles for decades, but beyond the namesakes of Little Armenia and Koreatown, they've quietly and mutually called the Crescenta Valley home too. So when the idea came up a year-and-a-half ago among community leaders to collaborate on a multicultural festival, it almost seemed like a non-question. In less than three weeks, the Korean Armenian Cultural Festival - organized by the Korean-American Federation of North Los Angeles and the Armenian Community and Youth Center in Montrose - will make its debut at the Crescenta Valley Park.
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