Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsCuriosity
IN THE NEWS

Curiosity

RELATED KEYWORDS:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 25, 2013
A NASA Mars orbiter is keeping tabs on the Curiosity rover. In June, a camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter snapped a photo of the Red Planet from above. If you look closely, the 1-ton rover appears as a tiny dot in the lower right corner of the image. The rover landed last August and is now traveling toward Mount Sharp, a mountain in the middle of an ancient crater that is the main science target of the mission. The color-enhanced photo from the orbiter shows Curiosity exploring a rock outcrop called Shaler in a region the rover has called home for most of this year.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | November 6, 2012
Several Armenian engineers who helped launch the Curiosity rover to Mars this past summer were celebrated during a visit Monday afternoon at Chamlian Armenian School, where they shared stories about their work. Engineer Arbi Karapetian brought along face masks, full body suits and booties - the everyday outerwear of the rover scientists during the seven years they assembled Curiosity at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. “Imagine working like this 12 hours a day,” Karapetian said.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | April 10, 2013
For the first time since it landed on Mars last year, scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory can't send commands to the rover Curiosity. The one-ton rover and its fellow Martian probes are on a “summer break” until May 1. Earlier this month, the sun came into position between Mars and Earth. The solar conjunction occurs about every 26 months and during this time, communication between the two planets is near impossible. Signals sent from Earth could be distorted on the way to Mars, so Curiosity and its predecessor, the rover Opportunity, are staying parked on the Red Planet for the remainder of the month.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | April 3, 2013
The supersonic parachute that helped the NASA rover Curiosity land safely on Mars eight months ago has become part of an accidental science experiment. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter snapped photos of the 100-pound parachute between August and January that show changes in its shape. Researchers believe this is evidence of wind blowing across the Martian atmosphere. PHOTOS: Mars Science Laboratory's parachute flapping in the wind The parachute was used to slow down the spacecraft holding Curiosity during a harrowing landing on Aug. 5. A photo of the parachute opening on Mars was sent back to Earth shortly after scientists confirmed the rover was alive and safe on the planet.
NEWS
By Liana Aghajanian | September 10, 2012
I'd never visited a psychic, but I'd always secretly wanted to. Despite the outlandish claims and even more ridiculous prices I'd seen when browsing late-night advertising on TV during bouts of insomnia or boredom - and the entire mess that was Miss Cleo - were there genuine people among us who did have a connection to a world we knew little about, but always wondered about? My curiosity got the best of me this weekend and I made an appointment for an indulgent glimpse into my future.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
UFO watchers' eyes were set ablaze recently by reports of what looked like a stony rodent lurking among the rocks on Mars. The so-called Mars rat, spotted in an image taken last year by the NASA rover Curiosity's Mast Camera, captured imaginations even as it inspired several new parody Twitter accounts. But, just so it's clear, this Red Planet rodent - which looks rather more like a guinea pig to this reporter's eye - is no more real than the Man in the Moon. In fact, the rat likely comes from the same source as that lunar visage: the human brain.
NEWS
By Amina Khan | December 9, 2013
Scientists working on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission have been somewhat sparing until now when describing exactly how the rocks drilled, gobbled and cooked by the Curiosity rover paint a picture of a life-friendly environment. Well, no more. In a suite of findings announced Monday, the scientists are painting a vivid picture of Gale Crater: filled with a modest lake of water, rich in the chemical ingredients for life, theoretically able to support a whole Martian biosphere based on Earth-like microbes called chemolithoautotrophs, the Los Angeles Times reported . “Ancient Mars was more habitable than we imagined,” Caltech geologist John Grotzinger, the mission's lead scientist, said of the findings described in six papers in the journal Science and at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | April 7, 2013
NASA's planetary science division - responsible for sending the rover Curiosity to Mars - will get an unexpected budget hike of $123 million for the rest of 2013. These additional funds will be used to continue planetary exploration, officials said. As part of a temporary spending bill signed by President Obama on Tuesday, Congress approved a budget of roughly $1.41 billion for the planetary science division, compared to about $1.19 billion in Obama's requested budget. "That means Congress values [the]
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | July 9, 2013
A rover that NASA plans to launch to Mars in 2020 is slated to collect samples of the Red Planet while setting the stage for a future human mission, the space agency announced Tuesday. The mission, which is estimated to cost $1.5 billion, also has science goals similar to previous Mars rover missions, including the search for past habitable environments. The Mars rover Curiosity, which landed on the planet last August, discovered clues earlier this year, that Mars could have once supported life.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | October 30, 2013
Jeweler and watchmaker Garo Anserlian first started working on timepieces over 40 years ago, and his work has followed him from Beirut to Montrose - but Anserlian never expected his work would one day be connected to another planet. Since 2004, Anserlian, owner of Executive Jewelers and Executive Clock Gallery on Honolulu and Ocean View avenues in Montrose, has created custom mechanical watches that are based on a day on Mars, which is 24 hours and 39 1/2 minutes. Even as new technology has offered other options for the scientists and engineers who were the original customers for the special watches, Anserlian said his Mars connection has brought him new business from collectors and space enthusiasts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Amina Khan | December 9, 2013
Scientists working on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission have been somewhat sparing until now when describing exactly how the rocks drilled, gobbled and cooked by the Curiosity rover paint a picture of a life-friendly environment. Well, no more. In a suite of findings announced Monday, the scientists are painting a vivid picture of Gale Crater: filled with a modest lake of water, rich in the chemical ingredients for life, theoretically able to support a whole Martian biosphere based on Earth-like microbes called chemolithoautotrophs, the Los Angeles Times reported . “Ancient Mars was more habitable than we imagined,” Caltech geologist John Grotzinger, the mission's lead scientist, said of the findings described in six papers in the journal Science and at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | October 30, 2013
Jeweler and watchmaker Garo Anserlian first started working on timepieces over 40 years ago, and his work has followed him from Beirut to Montrose - but Anserlian never expected his work would one day be connected to another planet. Since 2004, Anserlian, owner of Executive Jewelers and Executive Clock Gallery on Honolulu and Ocean View avenues in Montrose, has created custom mechanical watches that are based on a day on Mars, which is 24 hours and 39 1/2 minutes. Even as new technology has offered other options for the scientists and engineers who were the original customers for the special watches, Anserlian said his Mars connection has brought him new business from collectors and space enthusiasts.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
The Mars rover Curiosity won't be left in park on the Red Planet this week, but no updates about the mission will be tweeted. Scientists and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge are reporting to work despite the partial federal government shutdown that took effect on Tuesday, JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said. Curiosity and other missions that the center manages, including another Mars rover - - Opportunity --- and two Mars orbiters, are not currently impacted.
NEWS
By Amina Khan | September 27, 2013
A series of discoveries from NASA's Curiosity rover are giving scientists a picture of Mars that looks increasingly complex, with small bits of water spread around the surface and an interior that could have been more geologically mature than experts had previously thought. Curiosity's formidable arsenal of scientific instruments has detected traces of water chemically bound to the Martian dust that seems to be covering the entire planet. The finding, among several in the five studies published online Thursday by the journal Science, may explain mysterious water signals picked up by satellites in orbit around the Red Planet, the Los Angeles Times reported . The soil that covers Mars' surface in Gale Crater, where Curiosity landed last year, seems to have two major components, according to data from the rover's laser-shooting Chemistry and Camera instrument.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | August 29, 2013
If the NASA rover Curiosity runs into any obstacles on its trek to a mountain in the middle of an ancient crater on Mars, a new navigation system should steer it to safety. Engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge have turned on a technology that allows the rover to drive itself. The rover used the system for the first time on Tuesday. The 1-ton rover, which landed on Mars in August 2012, won't be able to take a joy ride on the Red Planet. Rover drivers and scientists who work at JPL will continue to plan its schedule and decide its destination.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity celebrated its first year this week since landing on the Red Planet, and scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have been looking back on the year since its nail-biting arrival with the "seven minutes of terror. " The rover drilled, lasered and imaged its way across 1.08 miles of Martian terrain during that first year, making some ground-breaking discoveries along the way. But now, scientists say, they're looking forward to the new year -- and the new set of challenges it will bring.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
A NASA Mars orbiter is keeping tabs on the Curiosity rover. In June, a camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter snapped a photo of the Red Planet from above. If you look closely, the 1-ton rover appears as a tiny dot in the lower right corner of the image. The rover landed last August and is now traveling toward Mount Sharp, a mountain in the middle of an ancient crater that is the main science target of the mission. The color-enhanced photo from the orbiter shows Curiosity exploring a rock outcrop called Shaler in a region the rover has called home for most of this year.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | July 18, 2013
The House Appropriations Committee has restored nearly $100 million to NASA's planetary science division, which funds missions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, officials announced Thursday. “It's definitely good news for JPL and good news for planetary science fans around the country,” said Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) in an interview. President Obama's 2014 budget proposal includes about $1.2 billion for the agency's planetary science division, around $200 million less than the previous year.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | July 9, 2013
A rover that NASA plans to launch to Mars in 2020 is slated to collect samples of the Red Planet while setting the stage for a future human mission, the space agency announced Tuesday. The mission, which is estimated to cost $1.5 billion, also has science goals similar to previous Mars rover missions, including the search for past habitable environments. The Mars rover Curiosity, which landed on the planet last August, discovered clues earlier this year, that Mars could have once supported life.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
Perhaps it was only a matter of time before NASA 's Mars Curiosity rover got its own official Lego avatar. The Mars Science Laboratory robot was picked by thousands of fans to be designed in toy brick form, and it joins a pantheon of other Red Planet spacecraft that have become popular playthings over the years. The rover was picked after thousands of people voted to have it turned into a Lego set at a company website that lets layfolk submit their own ideas for Lego sets.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|