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Depression

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By Kimberlie Zakarian | September 2, 2009
What do we do when faith is in opposition with psychology? Perhaps these two disciplines do not have to be completely in disagreement. Often, if we are people of faith, it is the full truth that sets us free. An integration of theology and psychology can be very healing. That is what the evolving of Family Faith into Faith and Life is all about ? integration of faith and science, because they do not have to be polar opposites. I enjoy a practice as a therapist where I treat those who are professing Christians as well as those who do not practice a certain religion.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | March 28, 2014
A Glendale Unified psychologist and a mental health services coordinator offered parents direction Thursday night in recognizing depression in teens in order to better prevent suicide. Glendale Unified psychologist Ilin Magran said during a talk hosted by the CV Alliance that depression can weigh on a teen's whole person and affect how they think, feel and behave. But unlike adults, depression in teens and young people can make them appear more distressed, according to Karen Carlson, who is a mental health services coordinator for the school district.
NEWS
December 16, 2003
Darleene Barrientos The holidays are known for happiness and joy, but for some, it is the loneliest time of the year. With pressure building to buy the perfect gift with little money or cope with grief over the loss of a loved one during the holidays, people easily succumb to feelings of sadness or depression. Anxious calls for help increase during the holidays, but the trick is to watch and know yourself, said Janet Richardson, the senior chaplain at Glendale Adventist Medical Center.
NEWS
By KIMBERLIE ZAKARIAN | March 3, 2007
As a pastor, and as someone who is studying to be a psychotherapist, I believe in the integration of theology and psychology. Perhaps 10 years ago I would not have. Psychology is a behavioral science, like medicine is a hard science. There is data and research to support this discipline. When our bodies are sick, we need medication to heal them. Likewise, when our brains are not functioning properly physiologically, we need psychotropic medication. We would not withhold insulin from a diabetic and Christians should not be ashamed to take mediation when they have a physical problem functioning, such as in depression.
NEWS
July 29, 2003
Darleene Barrientos It is oftentimes difficult for some people to see the light at the end of the tunnel when depression sets in, and lately, local police have received more calls from distraught people and their families. Glendale Police went to four locations Wednesday in response to such calls and officers put each person on a 72-hour hold because he or she was a danger to himself or herself or to others, officials said. However, police officers cannot reach them all. A 75-year-old Glendale man hung himself Friday from a tree at Crescenta Valley Park, even as three passersby tried to save him, police said.
NEWS
November 29, 2000
I am writing to raise awareness of what it means to be a caregiver, which, in many cases, is a thankless job done out of love. I am a family caregiver for my 87-year-old father who was diagnosed with vascular dementia three years ago. It isn't an east task. Yet, contrary to public belief, most family members care for loved ones in their home, rather than institutionalizing them. However, for whatever reason, there is still a push by Medicare HMOs to have family caregivers institutionalize their loved ones instead of helping them.
FEATURES
October 3, 2009
In response to the “In Theory” article about school prayer: It’s so wrong, on many levels. First of all, prayer in itself doesn’t make any sense because there has to be somebody on the other line to hear your thoughts. We cannot assume without some kind of proof that God is listening to you. You Christians cannot state things about God without any proof. For your information, faith is not the truth. You only hope that it is the truth. Kids are in school to learn, to get a better knowledge, socialize with other kids, and grow up to be a productive member of society.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
What is the most significant loss you can remember? For some, the answer may come immediately to mind. Others may have to ponder a bit to figure the answer out. Mine is fresh on my memory…my grandmother. She passed Oct. 21, six days short of her 99 th birthday. I will never forget the last time I saw her, nor will ever fail to remember the last conversation we had. My grief started 17 days before her passing when my mother phoned to tell me the end was near. I cried the entire night from somewhere deep within my being.
NEWS
By Kimberlie Zakarian | April 20, 2012
I have a career in which I have the blessing of helping those who have been wounded. Some have deep hurt that is of a physical nature. Others have emotional scars that hurt just as deeply. Often, when we are wounded, our mind cannot stop the cycle of remembering, pondering and ruminating on past events. It can be difficult to move on, feel joy and simply stop the repetitive thoughts of past injuries. These types of wounds, if formed at an early age, are literally hardwired into our brains.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | March 28, 2014
A Glendale Unified psychologist and a mental health services coordinator offered parents direction Thursday night in recognizing depression in teens in order to better prevent suicide. Glendale Unified psychologist Ilin Magran said during a talk hosted by the CV Alliance that depression can weigh on a teen's whole person and affect how they think, feel and behave. But unlike adults, depression in teens and young people can make them appear more distressed, according to Karen Carlson, who is a mental health services coordinator for the school district.
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NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | December 13, 2012
The 46-year-old man who jumped to his death Wednesday morning from the northbound Glendale (2) Freeway overpass was living with his parents and suffering from depression, police said. The man, Michael Romo, of Glendale, left a suicide note inside his 2001 Toyota Camry before he plunged to his death just before 6 a.m. from the overpass near Chevy Chase Canyon, Glendale Police Sgt. Tom Lorenz said. Police received a call from a witness who saw Romo standing on the ledge of the overpass just before it happened, Lorenz added.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
What is the most significant loss you can remember? For some, the answer may come immediately to mind. Others may have to ponder a bit to figure the answer out. Mine is fresh on my memory…my grandmother. She passed Oct. 21, six days short of her 99 th birthday. I will never forget the last time I saw her, nor will ever fail to remember the last conversation we had. My grief started 17 days before her passing when my mother phoned to tell me the end was near. I cried the entire night from somewhere deep within my being.
NEWS
By Kimberlie Zakarian | April 20, 2012
I have a career in which I have the blessing of helping those who have been wounded. Some have deep hurt that is of a physical nature. Others have emotional scars that hurt just as deeply. Often, when we are wounded, our mind cannot stop the cycle of remembering, pondering and ruminating on past events. It can be difficult to move on, feel joy and simply stop the repetitive thoughts of past injuries. These types of wounds, if formed at an early age, are literally hardwired into our brains.
NEWS
By Dan Evans | March 10, 2012
Our communities have been rocked in the last few weeks with a spate of suicides: Two teenage boys have killed themselves and a 13-year-old girl tried to do so. What is going on? In the case of 15-year-old Drew Ferraro, the specter of bullying has been raised by fellow students and his parents. Drew jumped to his death from a three-story building on the Crescenta Valley High School campus during lunch period in early February. But school and public safety officials have steadfastly denied bullying was the cause, pointing to a series of suicide notes stating a different reason.
NEWS
By Kimberlie Zakarian | May 12, 2010
If only our culture could slow down its rapid pace, we may see an increase in health ? especially in Los Angeles, where we live in a culture prone to rushing in various aspects of our lives. We hasten to get our children ready and to school, rush to work, and text and make calls as we drive. We have become so driven and achievement-oriented that often children are hurriedly picked up from school and driven to their many after-school activities. Add to this the need for meal preparation, homework, hygiene, our evening work, e-mails, Facebook, Twitter and texting, and we are a culture on overload.
FEATURES
October 3, 2009
In response to the “In Theory” article about school prayer: It’s so wrong, on many levels. First of all, prayer in itself doesn’t make any sense because there has to be somebody on the other line to hear your thoughts. We cannot assume without some kind of proof that God is listening to you. You Christians cannot state things about God without any proof. For your information, faith is not the truth. You only hope that it is the truth. Kids are in school to learn, to get a better knowledge, socialize with other kids, and grow up to be a productive member of society.
LOCAL
By Robert Morrison | September 24, 2009
I have been depressed for months over the inane and stupid attacks on President Obama, personally and on his proposed legislation. In November, after he won the presidential election, and again at the time of his inauguration, I mused to my wife what a house of horrors he had inherited from his predecessor and I wondered how long it would be before his actions and proposed legislation would come under severe attack. I quickly got the answer — it was not even a millisecond, it seemed, after he became president before he came under ferocious, unrelenting and mind-numbing attack by many Republicans and the loudmouths that claim to speak for the party.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | December 19, 2008
SOUTHEAST GLENDALE — A 30-unit, $13-million affordable housing project will soon rise from the gaping hole at 303 E. Garfield Ave., but even as stakeholders celebrated the groundbreaking Thursday, city officials said the days of successive low-income housing developments had drawn to a close. After more than five years of ushering in one city-subsidized housing project after another, the Housing Authority finds itself in no position to take on another multimillion-dollar development as the worsening economy continues to freeze up the credit market, city officials said.
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