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By ANI AMIRKHANIAN | April 29, 2006
In 1985, I was in the second grade. My mother accompanied me to school on my first day. I really didn't know what to expect since it was my first time attending a public school in California. My mother left as soon as I met my new teacher who stood holding a sign that said "Second Grade" in bold black letters. The students lined up in rows with their respective grade levels and prepared to make their way to their classrooms with their teachers. I stood in line behind a girl who, at first glance, resembled a boy. She had short hair and wore round glasses and carried an orange lunch box that had a picture of "Mr. T" on it. We started talking and I learned that my soon-to-be-friend was an Armenian tomboy named Carolyn.
NEWS
By Wayne Jones | April 22, 2007
Here's an answer to questions raised by Allen Brandstater ("Columnist raises some questions," Community Commentary, April 12) and Patrick Azadian ("Going tribal during elections," From the Margins, March 7): When I read Azadian's column I thought, "Is he referring to the Armenian tribe?" I am a member of the short, funny last-name tribe (Jones), difficult to pronounce by some other tribes I am a 48-year resident of Glendale, and I thought of the Armenians as one solitary tribe. Then, thanks to Ani Amirkhanian, a Glendale News-Press staff writer, I got a clearer picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Petrillo | May 5, 2010
It strikes you only a few minutes into “The Playboy of the Western World” how absolutely authentic the presentation feels. The set, the costumes, the characters, the language, all of them working in harmony to quickly transport the audience like a time machine to early 19th-century Ireland. After seeing a few shows at A Noise Within over the past year, I realize now that authenticity is their calling card. “Noises Off” plunged you into the ultra-realistic backstage drama of British theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynne Heffley | December 9, 2011
Adultery, infanticide, overtones of incest and patricidal urges: Eugene O'Neill's 1924 American classic, “Desire Under the Elms,” with its deliberate evocation of mythic Greek tragedy, caused an uproar when it was first produced. Indeed, a 1926 production in Los Angeles was deemed so obscene that its actors were arrested. In reality, of course, the stage has never been a stranger to all manner of sexual dysfunction and brutality. And the shock value of O'Neill's play about the converging fates of a rigid tyrant obsessed with the farm he has scratched from stony ground, the sons who covet it and a seductive new stepmother with a predatory eye - may seem somewhat blunted by today's measure.
NEWS
September 25, 2004
Jackson Bell Now when emergency workers have to respond to homes where the residents don't speak English, they have a useful new tool. Glendale Fire Chief Chris Gray and his staff, while at the city's Civil Service Commission meeting this week, introduced "Bridging the Gap," a translation guide that provides phonetic pronunciations for 36 phrases helpful for firefighters and paramedics. The phrases include, "Do you have pain?"; "Are you taking any medications?"
NEWS
February 19, 2005
ANI AMIRKHANIAN Third in a three-part series. In the past weeks I have been looking at the relationships between Armenian sub-groups. Now, I want to turn my attention to the Lebanese Armenians, the last sub-group I will be discussing in this series. Like the other two Armenian sub-groups, the Lebanese Armenian community is isolated in its own enclave and members tend to group with their "own kind." Perhaps the most distinguishing characteristic, in my opinion, about Lebanese Armenians or "Arevmedahyes," as they are known, is their very distinctive dialect.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | January 18, 2006
The American Dialect Society recently announced its word of the year: "truthiness." For those of you who don't spend your days glued to any of the myriad cable channels that cover the exciting world of professional word-smithing, the American Dialect Society is a group that has crowned itself an authority for sanctioning a word of the year. This year, "truthiness" is their pick. "'Truthiness' refers to the quality of preferring concepts or facts one wishes to be true, rather than concepts or facts known to be true," the society reports on its website.
NEWS
February 26, 2001
Francesca De Cesari stated she was proud not to be an American, because Americans have proven, in her estimation, to be uneducated and racist ("Racists bring down quality of America," Jan. 29). She goes on to say that her native Italy and other countries such as France are somehow more tolerant than the United States, because they have officially recognized the Armenian Genocide. My wife and I are Italian American, and we are very proud of our Italian and American heritages.
NEWS
By ANI AMIRKHANIAN | February 4, 2006
My cousin's 5-year-old son is being raised by parents who speak two different Armenian dialects. His father speaks the western dialect, and his mother, my cousin, speaks the eastern. The boy is conditioned to hearing and speaking both tongues and can differentiate and transition between the two during a conversation. The western and eastern dialects differ in vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar and orthography. Although his speech is developing more and more, he is not as articulate as other 5-year-old children who speak only one Armenian dialect.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynne Heffley | December 9, 2011
Adultery, infanticide, overtones of incest and patricidal urges: Eugene O'Neill's 1924 American classic, “Desire Under the Elms,” with its deliberate evocation of mythic Greek tragedy, caused an uproar when it was first produced. Indeed, a 1926 production in Los Angeles was deemed so obscene that its actors were arrested. In reality, of course, the stage has never been a stranger to all manner of sexual dysfunction and brutality. And the shock value of O'Neill's play about the converging fates of a rigid tyrant obsessed with the farm he has scratched from stony ground, the sons who covet it and a seductive new stepmother with a predatory eye - may seem somewhat blunted by today's measure.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Petrillo | May 5, 2010
It strikes you only a few minutes into “The Playboy of the Western World” how absolutely authentic the presentation feels. The set, the costumes, the characters, the language, all of them working in harmony to quickly transport the audience like a time machine to early 19th-century Ireland. After seeing a few shows at A Noise Within over the past year, I realize now that authenticity is their calling card. “Noises Off” plunged you into the ultra-realistic backstage drama of British theater.
NEWS
By Wayne Jones | April 22, 2007
Here's an answer to questions raised by Allen Brandstater ("Columnist raises some questions," Community Commentary, April 12) and Patrick Azadian ("Going tribal during elections," From the Margins, March 7): When I read Azadian's column I thought, "Is he referring to the Armenian tribe?" I am a member of the short, funny last-name tribe (Jones), difficult to pronounce by some other tribes I am a 48-year resident of Glendale, and I thought of the Armenians as one solitary tribe. Then, thanks to Ani Amirkhanian, a Glendale News-Press staff writer, I got a clearer picture.
NEWS
By ANI AMIRKHANIAN | April 29, 2006
In 1985, I was in the second grade. My mother accompanied me to school on my first day. I really didn't know what to expect since it was my first time attending a public school in California. My mother left as soon as I met my new teacher who stood holding a sign that said "Second Grade" in bold black letters. The students lined up in rows with their respective grade levels and prepared to make their way to their classrooms with their teachers. I stood in line behind a girl who, at first glance, resembled a boy. She had short hair and wore round glasses and carried an orange lunch box that had a picture of "Mr. T" on it. We started talking and I learned that my soon-to-be-friend was an Armenian tomboy named Carolyn.
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