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Discrimination

NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | July 15, 2010
GLENDALE— A federal judge has narrowed the scope of a lawsuit filed by five Glendale police officers who alleged discrimination and harassment due to their ethnic backgrounds. After reviewing arguments and a motion by the city to dismiss the case, U.S. District Court Judge Christina Synder on Friday dismissed at least two dozen defendants from the lawsuit because the allegations against them weren't sufficiently severe, according to federal court records. City officials hailed the ruling as indicative of the weak case against the Police Department.
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NEWS
By Max Zimbert | April 17, 2010
About two dozen Glendale High School students and teachers were taking their seats Friday to protest prejudice and harassment of all types, when a student a few yards away repeatedly yelled a derogatory term for homosexuals. The incident occurred as students handed out small notices that said they muted themselves to represent the unheard victims of discrimination and name-calling as part of the national Day of Silence. Participating students kept silent all day and wrote their responses to questions.
NEWS
February 17, 2010
Sheehan confirmed as new GUSD supt. Dick Sheehan will be named Glendale Unified?s new superintendent after the Board of Education finalizes his contract, school board members said Tuesday. The expected appointment of Sheehan from his deputy post to the top job came about a month after Supt. Michael Escalante announced plans to retire at the end of the school year. With Sheehan?s tenure expected to begin July 1, the contract will likely be finished by late March, officials said.
FEATURES
February 6, 2010
The Super Bowl is this weekend. But the game won’t be played without a bit of controversy. CBS has rejected an ad from a gay dating website. While entirely commercial in nature, CBS argues, the spot “is not within the network’s broadcast standards for Super Bowl Sunday.” While CBS has rejected other ads (one featuring a man named Lola), the folks behind the dating site say it is “straight-up discrimination.” What do you think? Is it discrimination?
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | January 26, 2010
GLENDALE — Four Armenian officers and one former officer have filed a joint lawsuit against the Glendale Police Department, alleging years of discrimination, derogatory comments and harassment because of their race. Officers John Balian and Robert Parseghian; Sgts. Vahak Mardikian and Tigran Topadzhikyan; and former Officer Benny Simonzad filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court on Wednesday, alleging myriad on-the-job discrimination and harassment incidents. When confronted with complaints of the discrimination, command staff failed to respond, according to the federal lawsuit.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | January 6, 2010
GLENDALE — A Glendale police sergeant has dropped his lawsuit against the city for alleged retaliation and discrimination because of his race and a physical injury, court officials said. Sgt. Vahak Mardikian had filed a lawsuit in 2007 alleging he was denied several promotions and the right to return to work as a full-duty officer after a knee injury because he is Armenian. Jury selection was originally scheduled to start Tuesday, but he filed for dismissal of the lawsuit Friday.
FEATURES
December 28, 2009
I’ve been a lawyer for many decades, and my clients have mainly been health-care providers. Lawyers, doctors, nurses and other professionals are required to take continuing education. But once they are licensed they are not required to take a six-hour SAT-like examination in order to continue their professions (“Deadline set for earning CLAD,” Dec. 22). Doctors and lawyers may take exams to become board certified or certified in a specialty, but these exams are voluntary.
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