Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: Glendale HomeCollectionsDisease
IN THE NEWS

Disease

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 2004
Robert Chacon Discovering that someone is in the beginning stages of Alzheimer's disease can be a shocking realization not only to the afflicted, but also to the people who will care for them. Verdugo Hills Hospital will offer its first workshop for families and individuals who care, or will care, for loved ones with the cognitively debilitating disease. Officials say they have given workshops for professionals such as live-in nurses or retirement homes before, but a rise in cases of Alzheimer's disease spurred them to offer the "Family & Caregiver Conversation" workshop, which focuses on memory loss and its effect on loved ones.
NEWS
November 6, 2003
Robert Chacon Mary Claire Garcia holds fast to what her late sister said about living with cystic fibrosis. "I think of [having cystic fibrosis] as kind of a race. I can't give up," Garcia said, quoting her sister, Claire Domino, who succumbed to the disease in 1987, at the age of 9. Mary's race is to find a cure for the disease that afflicted a sister she never met. Mary, 15, was born a year after Claire died. Her race continues Friday, when she will participate in the third annual Bowl for Breath at the Montrose Bowl in memory of her sister.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim | December 13, 2006
Professional golfer Cherie Zaun does not let Parkinson's disease stop her from playing golf regularly. "I'm an athlete," said Zaun, a Glendale resident for 28 years. "My passion is golf." Zaun spoke to a support group for Parkinson's disease patients at the USC University Hospital on Tuesday to introduce "Planning Your Course," an educational program designed for people newly diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. Zaun partnered with the National Parkinson Foundation and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc., a Connecticut-based pharmaceutical company to create the educational program.
NEWS
March 12, 2003
Mr. Ray Shelton, your vitriolic outburst against a race that has done you no wrong mirrors the superior, malevolent evil that fueled the most devastating genocide to happen on this planet. Cloaked in the hatred you spout, a slaughter was unleashed that consumed the lives of millions, has no parallel in human history, lasted 500 years and served to dispose a people from the land they had occupied for millennia. The fact it continues to this day shows the "Old World" mentality is alive and well.
NEWS
By Ryan Vaillancourt | January 30, 2008
Linda Macy has gotten to know the woman who always sits next to her at a 50s-plus singles social group over the past three months. They were becoming friends, until one day when, in the middle of a Christmas play, the new friend leaned in to Macy and whispered, ?I hate you.? Soon after, the woman leaned in again and said, ?I can?t stand it when you do that.? Macy wasn?t doing anything abnormal. In fact, she was sitting in silence enjoying the performance. That unsettling incident was the beginning of what Macy now suspects is the onset of Alzheimer?
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | January 17, 2011
Glendale Adventist Academy High School student A.J. Martinson knew little about podoconiosis before he stepped off a plane in Ethiopia in November 2008. But there in front of him were the grotesquely swollen feet, the primary symptom of the disease that has infected about 1 million of the nation's poor. He was accompanying his cousin, Dr. Larry Thomas, co-founder of Tropical Health Foundation Alliance, who has traveled to rural portions of Ethiopia repeatedly for more than a decade to provide health care to underserved communities.
NEWS
May 18, 2002
Sandra Kraisirideja, People GLENDALE -- The Crescenta Valley Support Group, an organization that counsels and educates people with scleroderma, will continue to meet despite the recent death of its founder Jim Brown. Brown died April 21 from complications of the disease. He was 79. Over a year had passed since he sponsored the group's first meeting at his home in La Crescenta. Bonnie Haskell of La Canada Flintridge and Linda Knutson of Glendale are the group's new co-leaders.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Why are so many of our old oak trees from the Verdugo land being cut down? Yes, some, because of disease, but other trees are successfully treated for disease. I think of two oaks in particular that really saddened me. One was on large hillside estate between Rossmoyne and Cortez and the other was on the southwest corner of Stocker and Cordova. That one I remember looking up at and thinking what a wonderful remnant it was of the old Verdugo estate. I thought these trees were protected.
NEWS
November 6, 2004
Robert Chacon A cystic fibrosis benefit held in honor of a local girl who died from the disease in 1987 attracted about 100 schoolchildren to Montrose Bowl on Friday. Students from Crescenta Valley High, Clark Magnet High and Rosemont Middle schools packed Montrose Bowl for the fourth annual Bowl for Breath and raised $3,000 through sponsorships and donations. The event honored the memory of Claire Domino, whose family organizes the event every year.
NEWS
August 4, 2010
Heart disease is leading Glendale killer Coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death among Glendale residents in 2007, according to a Los Angeles County Department of Public Health report released on Tuesday that detailed mortality rates and top causes for premature death. In Glendale, 594 people died from heart disease; coronary heart disease was also the leading cause of death countywide in 2007, according to the report. In Glendale, the second leading cause of death was emphysema and chronic obstruction pulmonary disease, with 125 deaths, followed by stroke with 124, then pneumonia and influenza with 117 and lung cancer with 112. When age was factored in, the second cause of premature death for people younger than 75 was suicide, followed by motor vehicle crashes, lung cancer and then drug overdose, according to the report.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mark Kellam, mark.kellam@latimes.com | January 4, 2014
A gently used dress in the back of a closet could make a young woman's evening special later this month as the Renal Support Network prepares for its 15th annual Renal Teen Prom for young kidney-disease survivors and their guests. The organization is accepting donated dresses and accessories until Saturday at the Polish Bar, 367 N. Chevy Chase Drive in Glendale from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. Several young women who will be attending the prom will be trying on dresses beginning on Friday, said Lori Hartwell, president and founder of the Glendale-based organization who was on dialysis from age 12 to 24 and has had four kidney transplants.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Why are so many of our old oak trees from the Verdugo land being cut down? Yes, some, because of disease, but other trees are successfully treated for disease. I think of two oaks in particular that really saddened me. One was on large hillside estate between Rossmoyne and Cortez and the other was on the southwest corner of Stocker and Cordova. That one I remember looking up at and thinking what a wonderful remnant it was of the old Verdugo estate. I thought these trees were protected.
NEWS
April 4, 2012
State agricultural inspectors have enacted a quarantine and are going door-to-door in a Hacienda Heights neighborhood in an effort to help save the state's $2-billion citrus industry and beloved backyard fruit trees from a disease that has wreaked havoc in Florida and Brazil . The sale of citrus trees is banned in a five-mile radius around the Los Angeles County neighborhood where Huanglongbing, or yellow dragon disease, was first detected...
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | February 3, 2011
Dozens of women, and a few good-natured men, Thursday slipped into red, sky-high pumps and strutted their stuff at the Glendale Galleria as part of the first Go Red for Women Stiletto Strut. “They are a little uncomfortable, but I am managing,” said professional motorcycle racer Chris Clark, who had squeezed his feet into a pair of red patent heels two sizes too small. “We have got full gear; we are not afraid of falling. We are going to be well protected.” Sponsored by the American Heart Assn.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | January 17, 2011
Glendale Adventist Academy High School student A.J. Martinson knew little about podoconiosis before he stepped off a plane in Ethiopia in November 2008. But there in front of him were the grotesquely swollen feet, the primary symptom of the disease that has infected about 1 million of the nation's poor. He was accompanying his cousin, Dr. Larry Thomas, co-founder of Tropical Health Foundation Alliance, who has traveled to rural portions of Ethiopia repeatedly for more than a decade to provide health care to underserved communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jon Haber | August 18, 2010
Despite personal struggles in her life, Glendale resident Judith Ritchie hasn't let any challenge stop her from educating and giving back to a community she has called home since she was 4 months old. In 1992, Ritchie lost her then-11-year-old son, Alan, to AIDS. Alan had contracted the disease through a blood transfusion when he was 2 days old, and he was diagnosed with HIV in 1988. Although she lost her son at a young age, Ritchie used her own personal tragedy as inspiration to educate others about a disease that so many Glendale parents knew little about.
NEWS
August 4, 2010
Heart disease is leading Glendale killer Coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death among Glendale residents in 2007, according to a Los Angeles County Department of Public Health report released on Tuesday that detailed mortality rates and top causes for premature death. In Glendale, 594 people died from heart disease; coronary heart disease was also the leading cause of death countywide in 2007, according to the report. In Glendale, the second leading cause of death was emphysema and chronic obstruction pulmonary disease, with 125 deaths, followed by stroke with 124, then pneumonia and influenza with 117 and lung cancer with 112. When age was factored in, the second cause of premature death for people younger than 75 was suicide, followed by motor vehicle crashes, lung cancer and then drug overdose, according to the report.
FEATURES
February 25, 2010
More than 40 years ago, Congress first requested that the president designate February as American Heart Month. I am pleased to report that every year since 1964, the president has designated the month to highlight the importance of heart disease awareness and prevention. This year, I am honored to once again co-sponsor a resolution in the House of Representatives in support of the goals and ideals of American Heart Month and National Wear Red Day. This resolution, 1039, unanimously passed the House earlier this month.
SPORTS
By Edgar Melik-Stepanyan | January 4, 2010
Not long ago, all Ron Garcia was focused on was his quest to compete in the United States Powerlifting Federation national competition in Las Vegas in November 2007. At the time, he had no idea of what was just around the corner — an unexpected twist of fate that would not only threaten his future as a powerlifter, but also his life itself. As the 2007 event approached, Garcia was prepared, consuming 5,000 to 7,000 calories a day. He was motivated, as few thought a 44-year-old powerlifter could do much at the nationals.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | December 19, 2009
Mason Arredondo added a healthy dose of banana liqueur to the boiling pan. Several handfuls later, a little more rum, and bam. “And that’s called flambe” the 14-year-old said. “Bananas foster, ladies and gentlemen.” On cue, the Glendale Kiwanis burst into applause. Suddenly, the quietness that had enveloped Mason lifted, and he flashed a broad smile. Mason, a freshman at Hoover High School, had no idea he’d be the star of Kiwanis’ Fulfill A Dream program, which this year was “Kiwanis Cooking Show Starring Mason.
Glendale News-Press Articles Glendale News-Press Articles
|