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NEWS
August 22, 2013
The California Department of Public Health has set a draft limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly lower than the current cap of 50 parts per billion for total chromium in drinking water. The state agency used more than a decade of research done by the city of Glendale to set the limit, which once its finalized will impact water providers statewide. “California is the first and only state in the nation to establish a maximum contaminant level specifically for chromium-6 in drinking water,” Ron Chapman, the department's director and public health officer said in a statement.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 23, 2013
While welcoming a draft of a proposed and long-awaited limit on the drinking water contaminant chromium 6, local politicians said they fear the state standard doesn't go far enough. The California Department of Public Health on Thursday set a draft limit of chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly higher than a goal set by state officials in 2011. At the time, officials set a goal of 0.02 parts per billion for the cancer-causing ion, but the Department of Public Health decided on a much higher maximum level, stating that the lower target would not be economically feasible for water agencies.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 5, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) took the California Department of Public Health to task Monday for “dragging its feet” on setting new limits on chromium 6 in drinking water, adding to a growing chorus of frustration among local officials. In a letter sent to the department's director Monday, Schiff called the years-long process for setting more strict contamination limits “unconscionable.” “I want to try to light a fire under them to get moving,” Schiff said in a phone interview.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 12, 2012
Glendale Water & Power has started testing a new filtration method to strip chromium 6 from groundwater and plans to start the process for other techniques next month. Previous methods have had some drawbacks, prompting the fresh approaches. Filtration adds an extra step to current testing, but the others, which include using resins and absorption technology to suck out the cancer-causing contaminant, are new ventures. “We're blazing the trail here,” said Charles Cron, plant manager at a chromium 6 testing facility in northwest Glendale.
NEWS
By Jason Wells, jason.wells@latimes.com | March 27, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) on Tuesday introduced legislation that would set a deadline for establishing a new federal cap on chromium 6 contamination in drinking water. The move comes two weeks after the congressman called on the Environmental Protection Agency to release a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans. Those findings - which would be key for setting new maximum contamination levels - were postponed so the agency could also finish studying the effects of inhaling hexavalent chromium, and then release both reports at the same time.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 14, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) increased pressure on the Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday to issue a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans, calling the slow progress “unconscionable.” In his letter to U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, the congressman whose district has a long-running problem with chromium 6 contamination of underground water said the agency “must stop wasting time...
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | May 25, 2007
Congressman Adam Schiff announced this week that a federal study has linked Chromium 6 in drinking water to cancer in lab animals. Schiff has been the leader in Washington to support efforts by Glendale Water and Power to find ways of eliminating the metal from drinking water. Chromium is a byproduct of manufacturing efforts in years past in the east San Fernando Valley. According to Schiff, a two-year study by the National Institute of Health's National Toxicology Program found that high doses of chromium 6 in drinking water cause cancer in lab rodents.
NEWS
March 14, 2001
Claudia Peschiutta GLENDALE -- Rep. Adam Schiff and other members of the California Congressional delegation are asking for an answers about chromium 6 and its effects. Schiff (D-Glendale) and 10 fellow legislators sent a letter Tuesday urging the National Toxicology Program to conduct a study to determine the carcinogenicity of chromium 6 in drinking water. Low levels of chromium 6 have been discovered in drinking water available to Glendale.
NEWS
September 1, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- Glendale is looking at ways to reduce the level of chromium 6 in drinking water and show the public its supply coming out of the faucet is safe. In an interview Thursday, City Manager Jim Starbird said he wants to alleviate public concerns and ensure that Glendale's drinking supply will be safe when ground water from the contaminated San Fernando Basin aquifer is used by the city Sept. 25 for the first time in decades. The city announced it will hire a consultant to review potentially costly options, and test drinking water at sampling stations in front of homes.
NEWS
September 29, 2000
In light of the recent news coverage of the carcinogen 6, I am glad to see that state Sen. Adam Schiff has taken a leading role in the fight to ensure that our local drinking water is safe. As a person who judges politicians by their actions not their words, Schiff's introduction of a bill requiring the Department of Health to test for levels of chromium 6 in our drinking water demonstrates his concern for our families. As a Burbank resident and mother I shudder to think that our water supply may be unsafe.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 11, 2013
In a letter to the California Department of Public Health this month, Glendale City Manager Scott Ochoa applauded the agency's draft limit on a cancer-causing water contaminant, but the majority of water agencies whose representatives spoke about the matter at a public hearing on Friday opposed the change. Those who oppose the draft limit, including Pasadena Water & Power, the Coachella Valley Water District and the San Gabriel Valley Water Assn., called the draft limit of 10 parts of Chromium 6 per billion cost-prohibitive and unnecessary.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 23, 2013
While welcoming a draft of a proposed and long-awaited limit on the drinking water contaminant chromium 6, local politicians said they fear the state standard doesn't go far enough. The California Department of Public Health on Thursday set a draft limit of chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly higher than a goal set by state officials in 2011. At the time, officials set a goal of 0.02 parts per billion for the cancer-causing ion, but the Department of Public Health decided on a much higher maximum level, stating that the lower target would not be economically feasible for water agencies.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
The California Department of Public Health has set a draft limit for a water contaminant known as chromium 6 at 10 parts per billion, significantly lower than the current cap of 50 parts per billion for total chromium in drinking water. The state agency used more than a decade of research done by the city of Glendale to set the limit, which once its finalized will impact water providers statewide. “California is the first and only state in the nation to establish a maximum contaminant level specifically for chromium-6 in drinking water,” Ron Chapman, the department's director and public health officer said in a statement.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
After overseeing a multi-million dollar project to research high-tech methods for stripping ground water of the cancer-causing element chromium 6, Glendale officials this week set aside hundreds of thousands more to figure out how to make the process cheaper. The move comes just weeks before the California Department of Public Health is scheduled to release a draft proposal that would set a limit for how much chromium 6 - made famous by the movie “Erin Brokovich” - will be allowed in public drinking water.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 11, 2012
As the sounds of a generator echoed through Glendale's largest reservoir, about 15 residents descended 32 feet underground into the facility's large concrete chamber. “Just thinking that I'm standing where I'll be drinking water from is an amazing experience,” said Hector Lavanchy, whose home neighbors the Diederich Reservoir. Wednesday marked the first time the public could view the south section of the reservoir, which has been undergoing construction improvements for more than a year.
NEWS
By Jason Wells, jason.wells@latimes.com | March 27, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) on Tuesday introduced legislation that would set a deadline for establishing a new federal cap on chromium 6 contamination in drinking water. The move comes two weeks after the congressman called on the Environmental Protection Agency to release a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans. Those findings - which would be key for setting new maximum contamination levels - were postponed so the agency could also finish studying the effects of inhaling hexavalent chromium, and then release both reports at the same time.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 14, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) increased pressure on the Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday to issue a long-awaited final report on the health impact of water tainted with chromium 6 on humans, calling the slow progress “unconscionable.” In his letter to U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson, the congressman whose district has a long-running problem with chromium 6 contamination of underground water said the agency “must stop wasting time...
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 12, 2012
Glendale Water & Power has started testing a new filtration method to strip chromium 6 from groundwater and plans to start the process for other techniques next month. Previous methods have had some drawbacks, prompting the fresh approaches. Filtration adds an extra step to current testing, but the others, which include using resins and absorption technology to suck out the cancer-causing contaminant, are new ventures. “We're blazing the trail here,” said Charles Cron, plant manager at a chromium 6 testing facility in northwest Glendale.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | March 5, 2012
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) took the California Department of Public Health to task Monday for “dragging its feet” on setting new limits on chromium 6 in drinking water, adding to a growing chorus of frustration among local officials. In a letter sent to the department's director Monday, Schiff called the years-long process for setting more strict contamination limits “unconscionable.” “I want to try to light a fire under them to get moving,” Schiff said in a phone interview.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 14, 2011
Glendale Water & Power plans to spend another $550,000 on a research project for stripping cancer-causing chromium 6 from local groundwater that already has cost $7.8 million. City officials say they need to make the expenditure because the current removal method has some drawbacks and the state may tighten restrictions. The additional funding comes from a coalition of stakeholders as California officials consider tightening restrictions on how much of the toxic element - already at 50 parts per billion - is allowed in potable water.
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