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By Dan Kimber | June 25, 2010
Editor's Note: Numerous instances of plagiarism have been discovered in Dan Kimber's “Education Matters” column, which ran in the News- Press from September 2003 to September 2011. In those columns where plagiarism has been found, a For the Record specifying the details will be appended to the piece. Today I'd like to give honorable mentions to two of my retiring colleagues, Hoover High School Principal Kevin Welsh and Supt. Michael Escalante. I use the word "colleague" because I never thought of either as my boss.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | March 21, 2014
Glendale Community College educators said this week they are confident they are meeting the demands for the workforce needs of the region. Don Nakamoto, executive director of the Verdugo Workforce Investment Board, told college officials that Los Angeles County officials predict a 3% growth in jobs in the area through 2014. He urged college officials to keep informed on local employers' needs in order to better train students to meet demand. “Without the employers there at the table telling us what their needs are…we're kind of working from the workforce side and education side in a vacuum, pretending to know what employers need,” he said.
NEWS
October 2, 2004
Darleene Barrientos Two of Glendale's longtime educators will be honored Sunday at the Armenian Educational Foundation's luncheon as this year's best in their profession. Hasmik Danielian, co-principal of Hoover High School, and Armine Hacopian, a member of Glendale Community College's board of trustees, will receive the foundation's Educator of the Year awards at a luncheon at 1 p.m. Sunday at the Sheraton Universal Roof Garden, 333 Universal Hollywood Drive, Universal City.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | March 15, 2008
GLENDALE — The Glendale Unified School District won’t have to lay off educators for the coming school year to cope with looming state budget cuts to education, but the district has informed some administrators and teacher specialists that their job responsibilities could change depending on how proposed state cuts pan out. Today is the state-mandated deadline for school districts in California to inform their certificated employees —...
NEWS
July 26, 2004
Darleene Barrientos The Glendale Unified School District has received a $1 million federal grant to improve U.S. history instruction for fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade students. District officials learned of the award this month. School board members are expected to approve the grant during their next meeting Aug. 17. The U.S. Department of Education issued the grant through the Teaching American History Grant Program. This year's round of funding is the second time Glendale's public schools received the grant.
NEWS
May 22, 2004
Gary Moskowitz Linda Evans wants all of her students to have a chance to take challenging, college-level coursework in high school, even if higher education is not something they plan to pursue. The more challenging the classes students take, the better prepared all students will be for any career they choose, said Evans, co-principal at Crescenta Valley High School. "No matter what students have planned after graduation, if they're taking college-level classes, they will do better in life," Evans said.
NEWS
February 20, 2001
I was glad to see Alecia Foster's article on Greg Krikorian's run for school board in the News-Press' Election 2001 Profile. Why? Three reasons: First, Krikorian has three of his own children in the Glendale public school system. Motivation to see our kids get a great education? You bet! Second, our present school board is mostly made up of professional educators. With all due respect, educators have their own set of motivations, which sometimes conflicts with what parents want for their children.
NEWS
September 21, 2000
Education is the key to everything -- to the future of our children, to our economy, to the safety of our streets. The recent labor agreement reached between the school district and the Glendale Teachers Assn. reveals an understanding of that reality. The association approved a two-year contract equaling a 14% increase in salaries and benefits for some 1,200 Glendale educators. The school board ratified the deal Tuesday. By approving such a hefty compensation package, the school district has affirmed the value it places on local educators.
NEWS
August 5, 2002
Gary Moskowitz District officials are saying there needs to be a better understanding among students, parents and educators about how money is being spent on technology and how that technology is to be used for education. The school board will meet at 3:30 p.m. today to discuss how they can help guide a technology master plan committee of parents and educators toward what Supt. Jim Brown calls more of a "total ownership" of district computers.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
In “Glendale teachers prepare for Common Core standards,” Sept. 21, it was mentioned that the new Common Core standards are slowly and efficiently being implemented in Glendale schools and that teachers are teaching the new material to other teachers. It was also mentioned that students are being transitioned into the new standards through tests proctored through computers. I believe that the methods used for transitioning both teachers and students into Common Core from the old standards are effective, however I cannot fully agree on the testing method used on children.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 25, 2014
Fewer Glendale Community College students transferred to four-year universities in California during the 2012-13 academic year compared to the year before - a decrease blamed on state education funding cuts that educators say impacted the Glendale campus. In 2012-13, there were 251 students who transferred from Glendale Community College to a UC school, down by about 50 when 299 students transferred in 2011-12. Also, 574 students transferred from Glendale Community College to a Cal State campus in 2012-13, a decline from 738 students who transferred in 2011-12.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 11, 2014
Glendale and Burbank students recently began taking the new computerized exams that have replaced the pencil-and-paper standardized exams across California. Both school districts have spent months preparing to administer the new exams that align with the state's newly implemented curriculum known as the Common Core. The schools will not receive scores measuring how well students do this year - which is considered a transitional period with many state and local educators seeing it as a year to “test the test.” Burbank Unified students began taking the exams earlier this month and, so far, it “has gone very well,” said Sharon Cuseo, director of instruction and accountability for Burbank Unified.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 10, 2014
Access to music programs in Glendale schools recently won the district recognition from a music industry group. Late last month, the National Assn. of Music Merchants designated Glendale Unified as one of about 375 school districts in the country as one of the year's “Best Communities for Music Education.” The NAMM Foundation, in a release, stated it aims to recognize districts that commit to making music a core part of its curriculum. The foundation surveyed school districts across the country to assess how school districts fund and staff their music programs, as well as evaluate how many classes and programs districts offer.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 3, 2014
For eight days last month, Crescenta Valley High teacher Christina Engen took night hikes in a Costa Rica jungle, observing leatherback sea turtles that were laying eggs along the coastline of the Pacuare Nature Reserve. Through Ecology Project International, the science teacher was one of two instructors from California to join more than a dozen other teachers from across the country who received fellowships to learn about Costa Rica's diverse ecology. While at the nature reserve, she worked alongside 18 researchers to track over 6-foot-long leatherback sea turtles as they came to shore to lay their eggs.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | March 21, 2014
Glendale Community College educators said this week they are confident they are meeting the demands for the workforce needs of the region. Don Nakamoto, executive director of the Verdugo Workforce Investment Board, told college officials that Los Angeles County officials predict a 3% growth in jobs in the area through 2014. He urged college officials to keep informed on local employers' needs in order to better train students to meet demand. “Without the employers there at the table telling us what their needs are…we're kind of working from the workforce side and education side in a vacuum, pretending to know what employers need,” he said.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | March 7, 2014
Glendale Community College educators are gearing up to implement a state law that aims to improve students' graduation and transfer rates. When the fall semester begins, incoming students will be asked to create an educational plan, stating whether they are interested in earning a specific degree, a certificate or whether they want to transfer to a four-year school. "The way that I like to explain a student education plan - it's like having a personal GPS so that you know how to get where you're going," said Jeanette Stirdivant, who is the interim dean of student services for the college.
NEWS
By Brian Crosby | February 14, 2014
Last week Hoover High had a Recruitment Night for the eighth-grade parents of Toll Middle School. About a few dozen Toll parents showed up. More than 100 Hoover students and faculty were in attendance. What's wrong with this picture? There are 450 eighth-graders at Toll; if 45 families were present that night, that would translate to a 10% return, with 90% no-shows. Back in September, I bemoaned the low parent turnout for Back to School Night. This night was more disheartening.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | February 8, 2014
Classical musician and composer Arturo Sandoval, who discovered his love for music as a boy growing up in Cuba, will share his talent at the Alex Theatre later this month in a concert aimed to cultivate music education in today's youth. His Glendale-based institute will also donate proceeds from the show to the Glendale Educational Foundation and Glendale Arts - two organizations that promote the arts and music education among local students. Sandoval's performance, titled "Save the Music 2," comes about a year after his institute's first performance that helped raise thousands of dollars for music education last year.
NEWS
February 8, 2014
Good morning, 818 readers! Today is Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014. Weather in the Glendale area is expected to hit a high of 66 degrees and a low of 51. We're rounding up the top headlines in the region: Los Angeles County transportation officials presented several alternatives this week for a new overpass and other road work in the San Fernando Corridor that would pave the way for the closure of one of the most dangerous street-level crossings...
NEWS
By Joylene Wagner and By Joylene Wagner | February 7, 2014
Parents have a lot to decide about their children's education. From a child's earliest years to adulthood, parents grapple with the choices they or their child must make in the pursuit of success and happiness. In my lifetime, the educational opportunities available to children have increased dramatically, to the point that today's families are bombarded with possibilities and recommendations. Where I started school in the San Gabriel Valley in the late 1950s, very few children attended preschool.
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