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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | November 21, 2012
City officials say they are on solid legal ground in continuing to transfer tens of millions of dollars in operating revenue from Glendale Water & Power -- no matter how residents vote in April on proposed amendments to the charter's language governing the practice. Pointing to newly found documents from more than 70 years ago, officials last week said that the city currently handles the electricity revenue transfers as intended: take a percentage directly from the utility's operating revenues and transfer it to the General Fund, which pays for parks, police and other general public services.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com and By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 13, 2013
In a 3-2 vote, the City Council on Tuesday night approved five years of electricity rate increases through 2018. When compounded, the increases equate to a 29% hike for Glendale's residents. The rate increases came after several public meetings about the dire financial state of Glendale Water & Power - officials have said it would have become insolvent by 2017 without increasing rates - and a barrage of criticism from customers, who pleaded last week at a council meeting for smaller increases.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | February 6, 2012
Glendale residents may soon be getting another technology device for their electricity-tracking arsenal. In addition to the near-real time reports customers will be able to access online - thanks to smart meters and print-outs mailed to residents comparing their electricity use to similar customers - Glendale Water & Power is also gearing up to offer an app-friendly way to communicate data. Glendale Water & Power is one of a handful of utilities to offer the “Green Button” technology, endorsed by the Obama administration.
NEWS
July 11, 2001
I have a letter from Glendale Water & Power indicating that a small increase in water and electric rates would become effective Jan. 1, 2001. The electric rate increase of a little more than half a cent is approximately a 5% increase. There was also an increase of 3 cents per HCF in the water rate. Six months later, with the cost of electricity and natural gas decreasing in the state of California, our new GWP director has raised electricity 2 cents per kilowatt.
NEWS
February 22, 2005
The News-Press and Leader visited Arax Zarzavatjian's fifth-grade class and asked: 'What aspect of Colonial-American life is still important today?' "I think the Declaration of Independence is the most important thing. It still lasts and gives us our independence." DAVIT JAVADIAN, 10 "Their inventions, because we still use them today, like electricity. We use electricity for games, the [PlayStation 2], the computer, TV." AREEN AZOAIN, 11 "Their inventions, like electricity.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | July 29, 2009
The City Council on Tuesday approved proposed ordinance amendments that will strengthen Glendale Water & Power’s ability to find and penalize the theft of electricity or water service. Service theft, especially of electricity, is estimated to cost the utility several million dollars annually. The proposed amendments define prohibited acts as meter tampering and unauthorized use or theft of service and provides for the recovery of fees and costs. They also include provisions allowing the utility to disconnect services in places where service theft has occurred.
NEWS
May 21, 2001
I am a senior at Clark Magnet High School in the mountain area of La Crescenta. I have read the April 27 story "Glendale enters deal with AQMD" in the News-Press that I did not know about. It was about how Glendale and other surrounding areas were producing electricity for thousands and thousands of people. However, the fact that the Glendale Grayson's power plants are emitting more than double the old limit bothered me very much. The power plant has no choice but to let out polluted air, because it has to produce more electricity.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | July 22, 2009
CITY HALL — Glendale Water & Power customers will soon be able to track how much electricity and water they use in real time under a major $28.5-million plan approved Tuesday by the City Council. The so-called smart grid has been hailed as the greatest advancement Glendale Water & Power has seen in the past 80 years and will include the installation of more than 100,000 advanced electric and water meters. After they’re installed, the meters will allow two-way communication with the utility and will for the first time provide customers with real-time usage data.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | May 12, 2011
Eleven men on Thursday celebrated the completion of a 96-hour-long certification course on “smart meters” at the Verdugo Jobs Center — the first of its kind in Glendale. Under the instruction of Professor Alan Sanga, who has an electrical engineering background and teaches at Glendale Community College, the class learned all things smart meter — which provide utilities with real-time data on customer energy use — along with electricity basics and alternative electricity sources.
NEWS
March 29, 2003
Darleene Barrientos The residents of a Palmer Avenue apartment complex don't know where to turn for help after an accidental kitchen fire displaced everyone who lived in the building. Diana Lopez, 20, said she lost everything in the explosion that left her apartment a charred skeleton of itself. She moved in two weeks prior, she said. The fire started in Lopez's kitchen as she was cooking Wednesday, and quickly gutted her unit. Firefighters had to cut electricity to the building, which happened to be the only electrical line to the entire complex.
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NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | April 10, 2014
Glendale Water & Power's electric section was recognized this week for providing customers with the highest degree of reliable and safe service with the Diamond Reliable Public Power Provider designation from the American Public Power Assn. “It is the highest recognition a public electric utility can receive,” said Glendale Water & Power General Manager Steve Zurn, adding that the award presented on Monday “represents a much appreciated recognition of the utility's staff commitment to provide excellent customer service.” A utility receives the designation if it performs well in these categories: reliability, workforce development and system improvement.
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NEWS
March 14, 2014
Good morning, 818 readers. In the Glendale area today, the high will be 74 and low near 52, according to the National Weather Service. Here are the top headlines in your region this morning: The fire that ripped through a Burbank triplex on Wednesday was reportedly caused by an electrical wiring malfunction and caused an estimated $560,000 in damage, authorities said. Hundreds of Los Angeles police officers drove in a procession to Glendale's Forest Lawn following an emotional farewell to Nicholas Lee, the veteran officer killed last week in a Beverly Hills crash.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 7, 2013
A popular digital picture frame used by a test group of Glendale Water & Power customers has significantly increased consumers' awareness of how much electricity and water they use, according to a survey released by the utility on Thursday.  The frame, which shows energy and water usage in near real-time, can also include a rotating selection of personal pictures and advertisements from the city. According to the survey, which gathered input from roughly 70 users before and after the frame was installed, found that: 39% of respondents said they “absolutely know” how much electricity is used in their home each day after using the frame, compared to 4% prior to installation 22% of respondents said they “absolutely know” how much running air conditioning increases their energy costs, compared to 7% prior to installation 20% of respondents said they “absolutely know” how much water is used in their home each day, compared to 5% prior to installation 83% of respondents experimented in some way, such as turning their lights or appliances on or off, to observe changes in utility costs displayed on the frame “It allows them to really manage their usage,” said Glendale Water & Power General Manager Steve Zurn, adding that the digital frame is a tangible way for customers to see the impacts of the utility's modernization efforts.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | October 24, 2013
The transition to Glendale's new electricity rate system , a five-year schedule of increases that started in August, has been mostly trouble-free, though there have been minor inconsistencies and errors, according to a city audit released this month. The City Council, on a split vote, ratcheted up electricity rates through 2018, beginning with an average 8% increase, followed by increases of 7%, 5%, 2% and 2%, in order to lift the utility out of the red. The compounded increases amount to a 29.1% hike for residential customers, 25.9% for commercial customers and 22.9% for small commercial customers.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com and By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 13, 2013
In a 3-2 vote, the City Council on Tuesday night approved five years of electricity rate increases through 2018. When compounded, the increases equate to a 29% hike for Glendale's residents. The rate increases came after several public meetings about the dire financial state of Glendale Water & Power - officials have said it would have become insolvent by 2017 without increasing rates - and a barrage of criticism from customers, who pleaded last week at a council meeting for smaller increases.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 7, 2013
The City Council took the first step toward increasing electricity rates Tuesday night, even after public speakers pleaded to not boost their bills and one woman was on the verge of being tossed out of council chambers. The majority of the council said they were open to five years of increases through 2018, beginning with an average 8% increase, followed by 7%, 5%, 2% and 2%. The compounded increase would be 29.1% for residential customers, 25.9% for commercial customers and 22.9% for small commercial customers, according to a city report.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | August 3, 2013
The City Council on Tuesday is set to discuss a controversial set of electricity rate increases that would raise the compounded rate by 29% for residents and 24% for businesses by 2018. The proposed hikes would begin with an average jump of 8% this year, followed by further increases of 7%, 5%, 2% and 2% in subsequent consecutive years. The rate increases would be compounded on top of each other. Officials have warned that without the hikes, the utility would become insolvent by 2017.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | July 20, 2013
After years of grappling with budget cuts, Glendale Community College is poised to invest millions of dollars in campus infrastructure improvements. The focus of about $2.3 million in spending planned for later this year will be to make the campus more energy efficient, resulting in six-figure annual savings to the college's general fund, Executive Vice President Ron Nakasone said. The work plan is also part of a strategy to leverage new state funding for energy conservation to address a $7-million backlog of deferred maintenance projects, Facilities Director Nelson Oliveira said.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | July 20, 2013
On a Sunday in early April, six out of the power-generating eight units at Grayson Power Plant were all inoperable. One had a blown boiler tube, one was down due to turbine repair work, one was scheduled to be offline and another was out of the picture because two other units were down. The superintendent of the aging plant was able to get some of the units back up and running that evening, 10 hours after calling in maintenance, electrical and plant control-system crews. Others remained unavailable for use for 24 hours.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | June 28, 2013
At Glendale Water & Power's final community meeting Thursday on a series of proposed electricity rate hikes, some residents said they understood the need, they just wish it wasn't such a steep increase. "We are all hurting," said resident Edward Haroutunian at the Pacific Edison Community Center Thursday night. "Come up with a more realistic figure. " Officials have proposed five years of what they call "significant" rate hikes, beginning with an average jump of 8%, followed by further increases of 7%, 5%, 2% and 2% in subsequent consecutive years.
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