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NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | July 22, 2009
CITY HALL — Changes to the Fire Department’s emergency services model will free up more rescue vehicles at peak call times, fire officials said Tuesday. The new system, approved by the City Council Tuesday, will replace two firefighters on each ambulance per day and replace them with non-sworn emergency medical technicians to go on less serious emergency calls, said Fire Chief Harold Scoggins. Currently, five ambulances are on call at any given time. With the new system, four ambulances would be on call during the slowest times of the day, with six on call at the busiest times, he said.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
The City Council on Tuesday is expected to approve new employee classifications as part of a cost-cutting shift to the Fire Department’s emergency services delivery model. The new system will replace two firefighters on each ambulance per day with non-sworn emergency medical technicians to go on less serious calls. WHAT TO EXPECT The council will likely approve the classifications as part of the program shift, which will save about $800,000. The plan was a part of the city’s budget adopted earlier this summer.
NEWS
October 4, 2003
Robert Chacon Before a backdrop of hills that burned in a 1999 fire, Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Glendale) and the state Office of Emergency Services on Friday presented Glendale with a new water tender truck. The Glendale Fire Department will use the truck within its jurisdiction to help fight brush fires, but must also staff and deploy it during major emergencies in surrounding cities and throughout the state, at the direction of the Office of Emergency Services.
NEWS
January 20, 2000
Buck Wargo CITY HALL -- Glendale may get shut out of any large-scale financial help to cover its costs of fighting and repairing damage of the December San Rafael Hills fire. Asst. City Manager Bob McFall said officials from the California Office of Emergency Services won't declare the fire a disaster area -- a requirement before Glendale could be eligible for funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The federal agency provides assistance to governments and victims of disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes and floods.
NEWS
June 26, 2004
Harvey 'Don' and Alda Lee Milam Harvey "Don" and Alda Lee Milam of La Crescenta celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary with a party in their home on April 12. They were married April 12, 1944, at the Methodist Church, North Glendale. The couple renewed their vows in a ceremony officiated by their son, Jay L. Milam, who is deacon of the Roman Catholic Church of Fullerton. Father Jude Herlihy of St. Juliana in Fullerton conducted a noon Mass in their home.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
With the overwhelming traffic problems in Glendale, the residents' concern over future water shortages and the stress on our infrastructure, I find it hard to believe the City Council would approve another apartment development exceeding 500 units in downtown Glendale. When a major earthquake occurs (and we know it will) our emergency services would not be able to handle our present population needs. Each time our Council approves a new development it compounds the existing city problems.
NEWS
January 15, 2005
Josh Kleinbaum Local lawmakers took to the skies Friday to get a look at the damage caused by several mudslides, as the state's Office of Emergency Services recommended Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger declare a state of emergency for Los Angeles County. A countywide state of emergency would allow Glendale and its residents to obtain state and federal funds for damages caused by two weeks of rain storms. "When you see how these slopes have failed, it gives you a whole new perspective on the awesome forces at work here," Assembly Majority Leader Dario Frommer said.
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | July 22, 2009
CITY HALL — Changes to the Fire Department’s emergency services model will free up more rescue vehicles at peak call times, fire officials said Tuesday. The new system, approved by the City Council on Tuesday, will replace two firefighters on each ambulance per day and replace them with non-sworn emergency medical technicians to go on less serious emergency calls, said Fire Chief Harold Scoggins. Currently, five ambulances are on call at any given time. With the new system, four ambulances would be on call during the slowest times of the day, with six on call at the busiest times, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 18, 2013
With the overwhelming traffic problems in Glendale, the residents' concern over future water shortages and the stress on our infrastructure, I find it hard to believe the City Council would approve another apartment development exceeding 500 units in downtown Glendale. When a major earthquake occurs (and we know it will) our emergency services would not be able to handle our present population needs. Each time our Council approves a new development it compounds the existing city problems.
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NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | February 2, 2013
Fire officials say the expansion of their ambulance services program yielded faster response times in 2012 and is projected to save the city $2.1 million next fiscal year. The program - which began Jan. 9, 2012, with four basic life-support ambulances working around the clock - saw paramedic response times decrease between five seconds and roughly four minutes among the Fire Department's nine engine companies. Emergency response times improved when paramedics were moved from serving on ambulances to the city's nine engine companies, Battalion Chief Greg Fish said at Tuesday's City Council meeting.
COMMUNITY
July 13, 2012
Bruce Edward Dahlberg June 8, 1955 - July 5, 2012 Bruce left us while doing what he enjoyed. He was visiting friends in Big Bear with his family for the Fourth of July celebration when he collapsed on a hike on a mountain trail. Emergency services were called and the response was the best from the fire department, the paramedics, the sheriff's department and the US Forestry. A rescue helicopter was overhead in the event transportation was required but the terrain kept it from landing in the immediate area.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | December 5, 2011
With the switch of a color-coded light, Glendale firefighters will now get a jump start on emergency calls before leaving the station. The new system, installed in Glendale fire stations at the end of November, sends out a digitalized voice message and signals with a color-coded light, alerting specific fire personnel to the type of equipment needed to respond to a particular emergency, officials said. “The bottom line goal is to get the folks out the door quicker,” said Don Wise, the Verdugo Fire Communications Center's executive administrator.
FEATURES
September 9, 2009
What a tribute to our community how everyone pulled together to help each other during this Station fire disaster. In all my years of being a Southern California gal I do not recall a fire of this magnitude without Santa Ana winds. We were very blessed. But most of all we were blessed with wonderful public servants! How about the next time we are at a grocery store or restaurant, let’s pick up some gift cards and drop them off at one of our local fire, sheriff or police stations.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
The City Council on Tuesday is expected to approve new employee classifications as part of a cost-cutting shift to the Fire Department’s emergency services delivery model. The new system will replace two firefighters on each ambulance per day with non-sworn emergency medical technicians to go on less serious calls. WHAT TO EXPECT The council will likely approve the classifications as part of the program shift, which will save about $800,000. The plan was a part of the city’s budget adopted earlier this summer.
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | July 22, 2009
CITY HALL — Changes to the Fire Department’s emergency services model will free up more rescue vehicles at peak call times, fire officials said Tuesday. The new system, approved by the City Council on Tuesday, will replace two firefighters on each ambulance per day and replace them with non-sworn emergency medical technicians to go on less serious emergency calls, said Fire Chief Harold Scoggins. Currently, five ambulances are on call at any given time. With the new system, four ambulances would be on call during the slowest times of the day, with six on call at the busiest times, he said.
NEWS
By Melanie Hicken | July 22, 2009
CITY HALL — Changes to the Fire Department’s emergency services model will free up more rescue vehicles at peak call times, fire officials said Tuesday. The new system, approved by the City Council Tuesday, will replace two firefighters on each ambulance per day and replace them with non-sworn emergency medical technicians to go on less serious emergency calls, said Fire Chief Harold Scoggins. Currently, five ambulances are on call at any given time. With the new system, four ambulances would be on call during the slowest times of the day, with six on call at the busiest times, he said.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | May 19, 2009
CITY HALL ? Caught between a growing budget deficit and pledges to leave public safety budgets alone, the City Council this week is scheduled to review police and fire services for possible cost-cutting measures as the new fiscal year looms. How the council approaches possible reductions for the Police and Fire departments, which together make up the lion?s share of the city?s general fund budget, will affect how other city services are impacted when the final cuts are made. Having already sustained millions in cutbacks over the past year as tax revenues plummeted with the economy, some city executives have already warned that any more significant reductions could spell the end of certain programs, or even employee layoffs.
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