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NEWS
August 12, 2008
The Glendale News-Press visited Crescenta Valley High School and asked adult students in an Emergency Medical Technician class: “What’s the most valuable thing you’ve learned this summer about being an EMT?”         “Lifesaving skills. For me, I want to be a nurse. I want to start from the bottom and work my way up.” KATIE VAHOVIAK, 22 Burbank           “How to remain calm in stressful situations.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | August 12, 2008
Lydia Vannarattanarat inserted a plastic medical device called an oropharyngeal airway last week into the mouth of a medical mannequin and rotated the device 180 degrees. As she did so, Kelly Chulick, a retired Burbank firefighter and Emergency Medical Technician instructor, peppered her with questions. How did Vannarattanarat know that the device was in properly? If the device were in a real person, how would she tell that it was working? How would she remove this plastic tube-like device when she needed to?
FEATURES
August 22, 2009
Firefighter/paramedic Craig Skidmore , a 22-year veteran firefighter with the city of Glendale, was promoted to the rank of fire captain, effective Aug. 16, and will be assigned to the ?C? platoon. Skidmore joined the Glendale fire family in April 1987 and was certified as a paramedic in 1999. He has participated in many department projects and programs, including the assignments as awards committee chairman, explorer advisor, CPR instructor, Community Emergency Response Team instructor, EMT instructor, certified hazardous materials specialist, urban search and rescue team technician and a member of the Fire Department?
NEWS
October 20, 2001
Amber Willard SOUTHWEST GLENDALE -- An impasse in contract negotiations led to cries of protest among a group of picketing emergency services workers Friday. About 30 paramedics and emergency medical technicians carried protest signs in front of the American Medical Response dispatch office on Broadway. "They start EMTs at $8.46 an hour. That's why we're here," said Carlos Osorio, who has worked for the company as an EMT for 12 years and is a chief shop steward for their union.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | May 20, 2005
The Glendale City Council was advised by Budget Director Robert Franz to add more than $2 million into the 2005-2006 budget to cover urgent costs, including full funding for the city paramedic program. The program is short more than $1 million in needed funding, a fact Fire Chief Chris Gray blamed on the failure of payments to keep up with costs. "We actually have a good payment rate of 80 percent," Gray said. He added that insurance companies are capping fees and Medicare payments remain slow.
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | July 22, 2009
CITY HALL — Changes to the Fire Department’s emergency services model will free up more rescue vehicles at peak call times, fire officials said Tuesday. The new system, approved by the City Council on Tuesday, will replace two firefighters on each ambulance per day and replace them with non-sworn emergency medical technicians to go on less serious emergency calls, said Fire Chief Harold Scoggins. Currently, five ambulances are on call at any given time. With the new system, four ambulances would be on call during the slowest times of the day, with six on call at the busiest times, he said.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | May 26, 2011
CITY HALL — Glendale fire officials are proposing sweeping changes to the department in order to cut costs, including hiring 60 hourly emergency medical technicians to offset the 21 sworn firefighter positions that will be eliminated through attrition within the next two years. The transition could eventually end up saving the city $2.5 million annually, Fire Chief Harold Scoggins said, because the hourly workers wouldn’t require the benefits that their full-time counterparts get. The city’s rising pension obligations have been a driving factor behind the need to cut expenses or face crushing budget deficits.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | August 1, 2009
GLENDALE ? Two fire engines and an ambulance will soon be stationed at Glendale Community College to help train fire cadets and emergency medical technician students. The City Council on Tuesday approved the donation from the Glendale Fire Department to the college?s emergency medical technician program and Verdugo Fire Academy, which trains men and women to become firefighters. Students and instructors at the college?s fire academy currently use the department?s reserve engines to train, but they can?
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NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | May 26, 2011
CITY HALL — Glendale fire officials are proposing sweeping changes to the department in order to cut costs, including hiring 60 hourly emergency medical technicians to offset the 21 sworn firefighter positions that will be eliminated through attrition within the next two years. The transition could eventually end up saving the city $2.5 million annually, Fire Chief Harold Scoggins said, because the hourly workers wouldn’t require the benefits that their full-time counterparts get. The city’s rising pension obligations have been a driving factor behind the need to cut expenses or face crushing budget deficits.
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FEATURES
August 22, 2009
Firefighter/paramedic Craig Skidmore , a 22-year veteran firefighter with the city of Glendale, was promoted to the rank of fire captain, effective Aug. 16, and will be assigned to the ?C? platoon. Skidmore joined the Glendale fire family in April 1987 and was certified as a paramedic in 1999. He has participated in many department projects and programs, including the assignments as awards committee chairman, explorer advisor, CPR instructor, Community Emergency Response Team instructor, EMT instructor, certified hazardous materials specialist, urban search and rescue team technician and a member of the Fire Department?
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | August 1, 2009
GLENDALE ? Two fire engines and an ambulance will soon be stationed at Glendale Community College to help train fire cadets and emergency medical technician students. The City Council on Tuesday approved the donation from the Glendale Fire Department to the college?s emergency medical technician program and Verdugo Fire Academy, which trains men and women to become firefighters. Students and instructors at the college?s fire academy currently use the department?s reserve engines to train, but they can?
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | July 22, 2009
CITY HALL — Changes to the Fire Department’s emergency services model will free up more rescue vehicles at peak call times, fire officials said Tuesday. The new system, approved by the City Council on Tuesday, will replace two firefighters on each ambulance per day and replace them with non-sworn emergency medical technicians to go on less serious emergency calls, said Fire Chief Harold Scoggins. Currently, five ambulances are on call at any given time. With the new system, four ambulances would be on call during the slowest times of the day, with six on call at the busiest times, he said.
NEWS
August 12, 2008
The Glendale News-Press visited Crescenta Valley High School and asked adult students in an Emergency Medical Technician class: ?What?s the most valuable thing you?ve learned this summer about being an EMT?? ? ? ? ? ?Lifesaving skills. For me, I want to be a nurse. I want to start from the bottom and work my way up.? KATIE VAHOVIAK, 22 Burbank ? ? ? ? ? ?How to remain calm in stressful situations. That through controlling your emotions, you can better serve your patients.
NEWS
By Angela Hokanson | August 12, 2008
Lydia Vannarattanarat inserted a plastic medical device called an oropharyngeal airway last week into the mouth of a medical mannequin and rotated the device 180 degrees. As she did so, Kelly Chulick, a retired Burbank firefighter and Emergency Medical Technician instructor, peppered her with questions. How did Vannarattanarat know that the device was in properly? If the device were in a real person, how would she tell that it was working? How would she remove this plastic tube-like device when she needed to?
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | May 20, 2005
The Glendale City Council was advised by Budget Director Robert Franz to add more than $2 million into the 2005-2006 budget to cover urgent costs, including full funding for the city paramedic program. The program is short more than $1 million in needed funding, a fact Fire Chief Chris Gray blamed on the failure of payments to keep up with costs. "We actually have a good payment rate of 80 percent," Gray said. He added that insurance companies are capping fees and Medicare payments remain slow.
NEWS
October 20, 2001
Amber Willard SOUTHWEST GLENDALE -- An impasse in contract negotiations led to cries of protest among a group of picketing emergency services workers Friday. About 30 paramedics and emergency medical technicians carried protest signs in front of the American Medical Response dispatch office on Broadway. "They start EMTs at $8.46 an hour. That's why we're here," said Carlos Osorio, who has worked for the company as an EMT for 12 years and is a chief shop steward for their union.
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