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Enceladus

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NEWS
December 9, 2005
Jets of fine, icy particles streaming from Saturn's moon Enceladus were captured in recent images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The images provide unambiguous visual evidence that the moon is geologically active. "For planetary explorers like us, there is little that can compare to the sighting of activity on another solar system body," Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo., said in a prepared statement. "This has been a heart-stopper, and surely one of our most thrilling results."
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | March 17, 2006
A tiny Saturn moon has made a big splash at JPL. The Cassini spacecraft may have found evidence of liquid water reservoirs on the surface of Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons. Cassini is the first spacecraft to explore the Saturn system from its orbit. Since entering Saturn's orbit on June 30, 2004, the spacecraft has sent data and images of not only the planet's rings but also of its many moons. High-resolution Cassini images showed icy jets and towering plumes ejecting large quantities of particles at a high speed.
NEWS
By Sara Cardine | November 9, 2009
Images and data from one of Saturn’s moons sent this week to scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory indicate the possibility of a liquid ocean beneath the surface of Enceladus, which may contain the conditions necessary for life. Information was gathered in a flyby Nov. 2 as part of the Cassini mission to Saturn, currently in its fifth year, in which NASA hopes to learn more about the exact composition of bodies existing within the planet’s rings. During this seventh flyby of Enceladus, the spacecraft called E-7 concentrated its sonar and photographic efforts on a liquid plume emitted through fissures at the moon’s south pole, according to Bonnie Buratti, a JPL astronomer who’s worked on the project since the craft’s 1997 launch.
NEWS
By Michael J. Arvizu | March 29, 2010
Linda J. Spilker, a project scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, grins when she talks about the discoveries made by the Hyugens probe as it nears its sixth year on the surface of Titan, one of Saturn’s moons. “It’s just totally amazing,” she said, referring to the probe’s early exploration of Titan. “Here are some of these pictures coming back, and they’re showing what looks like we’re landing in, perhaps, a streambed or something.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | August 3, 2007
Weather conditions on Earth and Mars are plaguing two Jet Propulsion Laboratory missions. The Phoenix Mars Lander, which had a scheduled launch Friday, has now been postponed to Saturday at 3:02 a.m. PST. The delay is due to severe weather at the Kennedy Space Center, while the rovers Opportunity and Spirit are still battling a severe dust storm on the Martian surface. JPL/NASA announced that Friday's launch of the Phoenix Mars Lander has been postponed 24 hours to 3:02 a.m. PST, Saturday.
FEATURES
By DAVID DREIER | March 27, 2006
This spring, I have spoken with thousands of constituents during our "telephone town hall meetings." The issues raised ran the gamut from international policy to local concerns, like protecting the Angeles National Forest. The calls were a terrific give and take, and they reinforced what I have always strongly believed: Californians are passionate, involved, informed and optimistic. Along these lines, a few recent local stories perfectly capture the talent and promise of the Foothills, and I want to share them with you. As many of you know, I am fervent admirer and supporter of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | March 31, 2006
A little more than seven months after its launch the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has sent back the first set of pictures. The pictures were taken with the spacecraft's High Resolution Imaging camera. "These were test images," Candice Hansen-Koharcheck, MRO research scientist with JPL, said. The photos were taken as a test of the camera as well as the spacecraft, Hansen-Koharcheck said. The stability of MRO plays a role in the results of the photographs as does the aiming mechanics.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | January 2, 2009
Earthbound stories in 2008 dealt with roller coaster gas prices, an economy in crisis and a state budget deficit that continues to grow. But among the stars the stories were of survival, finding new worlds and continuous exploration managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “We started this year with our 50th anniversary of Explorer 1, the first American satellite after Sputnik,” said Dr. Charles Elachi, JPL director, in a year-end interview with the Valley Sun. “That was built at JPL, in our own backyard.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | December 30, 2005
Scientists at JPL can look back at 2005 as the year they ran through cosmic rings, had two Martian birthday parties, and smacked head first into a comet, on purpose. The spacecraft Cassini-Huygens ended the year with a flyby of Saturn's moon, Titan. The spacecraft has been sending back images and data from the planet since its arrival in July 2004. Scientists have discovered new information on the make-up of the famous rings but also on the strange formation they produce. In one case they viewed images of Saturn's F ring which seemed to have knots, kinks and clumps in it. What they discovered through Cassini was that the shepherding satellite Prometheus' gravitational pull caused the unusual phenomenon.
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NEWS
By Michael J. Arvizu | March 29, 2010
Linda J. Spilker, a project scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, grins when she talks about the discoveries made by the Hyugens probe as it nears its sixth year on the surface of Titan, one of Saturn’s moons. “It’s just totally amazing,” she said, referring to the probe’s early exploration of Titan. “Here are some of these pictures coming back, and they’re showing what looks like we’re landing in, perhaps, a streambed or something.
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NEWS
By Sara Cardine | November 9, 2009
Images and data from one of Saturn’s moons sent this week to scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory indicate the possibility of a liquid ocean beneath the surface of Enceladus, which may contain the conditions necessary for life. Information was gathered in a flyby Nov. 2 as part of the Cassini mission to Saturn, currently in its fifth year, in which NASA hopes to learn more about the exact composition of bodies existing within the planet’s rings. During this seventh flyby of Enceladus, the spacecraft called E-7 concentrated its sonar and photographic efforts on a liquid plume emitted through fissures at the moon’s south pole, according to Bonnie Buratti, a JPL astronomer who’s worked on the project since the craft’s 1997 launch.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | March 17, 2006
A tiny Saturn moon has made a big splash at JPL. The Cassini spacecraft may have found evidence of liquid water reservoirs on the surface of Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons. Cassini is the first spacecraft to explore the Saturn system from its orbit. Since entering Saturn's orbit on June 30, 2004, the spacecraft has sent data and images of not only the planet's rings but also of its many moons. High-resolution Cassini images showed icy jets and towering plumes ejecting large quantities of particles at a high speed.
NEWS
December 9, 2005
Jets of fine, icy particles streaming from Saturn's moon Enceladus were captured in recent images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The images provide unambiguous visual evidence that the moon is geologically active. "For planetary explorers like us, there is little that can compare to the sighting of activity on another solar system body," Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo., said in a prepared statement. "This has been a heart-stopper, and surely one of our most thrilling results."
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