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NEWS
February 11, 2011
Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Silver Lake) may have found a new energy source for California — the pavement beneath your car tires. Last week, Gatto introduced Assembly Bill 306, a proposal to launch tests of “piezoelectric” generation of energy. Essentially, sensors would be placed in roadbeds trembling under the weight of vehicles, harnessing that energy and using it to run nearby streetlights and residences. Gatto said Israel is using the sensors, and Italy plans to test them on part of the nation’s autostrada, or superhighway.
NEWS
By Max Zimbert | June 16, 2010
NORTHEAST GLENDALE — Energy-conservation efforts at Glendale Community College have saved $200,000, putting a dent in its $4.5-million deficit this upcoming school year, officials said. The $200,000 saved means fewer concessions facing employee groups as they brace for what's likely to be another year of givebacks, college Controller Ron Nakasone said. "We're going back to the unions and employee groups to take pay cuts, and we're cutting the budget next year, so this saves us $200,000 of cuts," he said.
NEWS
By Sameea Kamal, sameea.kamal@latimes.com | April 21, 2014
Solar ovens. Solar artwork. Solar phone chargers. Out of electricity? No problem. You can still power up. That was the lesson many took away at the third annual Solar Faire, hosted by Glendale Water & Power in partnership with Sebastopol, Calif.-based nonprofit the Rahus Institute and the Glendale Unified School District. This year's festival, which took place on Saturday at Woodrow Wilson Middle School, featured hands-on workshops where participants could build their own solar ovens, create solar etchings and watch demonstrations of solar power, such as how to power up a solar fountain.
NEWS
July 6, 2001
Tim Willert DOWNTOWN -- Glendale Water and Power, in response to the rising cost of wholesale energy, has decided to pass the increase along to its customers. GWP announced Thursday that, effective July 2, it raised consumer energy prices by 2 cents per kilowatt hour for electricity and 2 cents per hundred cubic feet of water. For electricity, that will end up costing customers $25.50 every two months for single-family residences, $11 for apartments every two months and $16 per two months for condominiums, GWP spokeswoman Vickie Gardner said Thursday.
NEWS
July 17, 2001
Alecia Foster NORTHEAST GLENDALE -- Solar energy will be powering more than just part of Glendale Community College's Cimmarusti Science Center. The alternative energy source will be used to power students' minds through a partnership between Glendale Water & Power and the college that will bring state-of-the-art energy and renewable energy programs to the school. College President John Davitt called the program "a milestone in the construction of our science center."
NEWS
October 11, 2001
Tim Willert CITY HALL -- Residents who are low energy users could save as much as $2 on their bimonthly bills under a rate restructuring proposal being considered by the Glendale Water and Power Commission. Conversely, commercial customers who use as much as 25,000 kilowatt hours of energy per month may see their bills go up as high as $2,000 under the proposal, which was discussed Wednesday during a study session attended by commissioners and GWP officials.
NEWS
April 18, 2005
Darleene Barrientos A parade of trucks, vans and cars descended on the parking lot across from Verdugo Park Saturday, not for a festival or a party, but to trade in their halogen lamps for more environmentally-friendly fluorescent models. The city-sponsored Free Torchiere Lamp Exchange day invited residents to bring in their halogen lamps to exchange them for one of 1,200 free, 55-watt fluorescent models, as part of the city's effort to help residents be more environmentally friendly and save money at the same time.
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha | August 21, 2008
GLENDALE — The school board Tuesday night approved energy conservation guidelines for the district in a quest to save money and make schools more environmentally friendly. The guidelines will result in a review of energy and water usage for educational programs, food services, landscaping, transportation, maintenance, new construction and administrative operations. Specific changes that will be requested include a reduction of power during high-peak hours, cutting equipment and lighting usage when a building is closed, and shutting down a classroom or facility when it is not being used.
NEWS
January 30, 2004
Josh Kleinbaum While insisting that it did nothing wrong during the California energy crunch of 2000 and 2001, the city of Glendale has agreed to pay the Federal Energy Regulation Commission $25,000 -- the amount that FERC claims the city owes the federal government -- to settle accusations of manipulating the energy market. If a judge and the commission approve the deal and the commission itself, Glendale will pay $14,000 for allegations that the city manipulated prices during the energy crisis, and $11,000 for doing so in partnership with Enron and Coral Power LLC. "Glendale denies, as we have throughout this proceeding, that the allegations made against Glendale relating to gaming and partnership have any merit," Senior Assistant City Atty.
NEWS
April 22, 2008
The Glendale News-Press visited La Crescenta Elementary School and asked students: ?What did you learn about the different types of energy?? ? ? ? ? ?I learned how light travels in a straight line, and we learned how we use energy with light and heat.? Catrina Voors, 8 Montrose ? ? ? ? ? ?I learned how light and sound can travel easily.? Mitchell Bayles, 9 La Crescenta ? ? ? ?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sameea Kamal, sameea.kamal@latimes.com | April 21, 2014
Solar ovens. Solar artwork. Solar phone chargers. Out of electricity? No problem. You can still power up. That was the lesson many took away at the third annual Solar Faire, hosted by Glendale Water & Power in partnership with Sebastopol, Calif.-based nonprofit the Rahus Institute and the Glendale Unified School District. This year's festival, which took place on Saturday at Woodrow Wilson Middle School, featured hands-on workshops where participants could build their own solar ovens, create solar etchings and watch demonstrations of solar power, such as how to power up a solar fountain.
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SPORTS
By Robert Fulton, Special to the Glendale News-Press | January 10, 2014
BURBANK - When Burroughs High's and Glendale's girls' basketball teams met in Friday night's Pacific League bout, it was a game that featured two squads dealing with different realities. For the Indians, they're positioning themselves to repeat as league champs. For the Nitros, they're trying to get the season in gear before it's too late. Burroughs kept its hopes in line, in turn further disrupting the Nitros', as the Indians prevailed, 67-30, at home. The Indians, who have won three straight and five of their last six, improved to 10-6 overall and 2-0 in league.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
Re: “Power comparisons pay off,” Oct. 11. The bimonthly Opower reports compare a consumer's energy use with a composite of their neighbor's usage. I find these mailings irritating and mean-spirited. They employ 'big brother' manipulation, which in effect makes GWP customers feel “less than” when compared with their neighbors. These comparisons fail to take into account that one consumer's usage cannot be matched with another's depending on their circumstances. How can you compare a couple working during the day with a mom who stays at home with her children - especially those with babies who require more heat for their newborns when the weather gets cooler?
SPORTS
By Emin Avakian, Special to the Glendale News-Press | October 31, 2013
GLENDALE - Stakes were high when the Glendale High and Crescenta Valley girls' volleyball squads met on Thursday afternoon. With the coveted fourth seed in the Pacific League standings on the line and playoff implications in play, the Falcons played like it en route to a 25-21, 25-20, 25-18 win over the Nitros at Glendale High School. Emmie Walker led Crescenta Valley with 12 kills and was often times the end result of an offense that was in sync from gaining possession to passing and setting up outside hitters and the middle blocker.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | July 20, 2013
After years of grappling with budget cuts, Glendale Community College is poised to invest millions of dollars in campus infrastructure improvements. The focus of about $2.3 million in spending planned for later this year will be to make the campus more energy efficient, resulting in six-figure annual savings to the college's general fund, Executive Vice President Ron Nakasone said. The work plan is also part of a strategy to leverage new state funding for energy conservation to address a $7-million backlog of deferred maintenance projects, Facilities Director Nelson Oliveira said.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | July 13, 2013
Les Perkins is used to paying roughly $400 every two months to Glendale Water & Power, but his latest electricity bill was markedly different. He owed just $85. "I started giggling with glee," he said. Perkins runs a video-editing company out of his Rancho-Riverside home and the air conditioning and computer equipment can run up his electricity bills. But his green upgrade last September didn't cost him anything upfront because of a popular city subsidy and a leasing program offered by his installer.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | June 29, 2013
The City Council established earlier this week a new state-mandated program for Glendale Water & Power to purchase locally generated renewable energy. The council passed an ordinance on Tuesday adopting a so-called feed-in tariff program under which local generators of renewable energy can sign on for 10, 15, or 20 years to sell 100% of the power they generate to the city at rates calculated to equal the cost of obtaining that electricity elsewhere. Glendale was required by law to establish a tariff program by July 1. The state-wide program was mandated by California State Senate Bill 1122 in 2008 as a means of helping California utilities meet the state's renewable energy requirements.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | May 25, 2013
Glendale Water & Power commissioners are recommending that Glendale's utility wean itself off coal before 2027, with one calling it a "politically important" symbol. If the City Council ultimately decides to go along with the recommendation and make the timetable official, the move would come on the heels of Los Angeles vowing to do the same by 2025. Glendale Water & Power officials have been working on reducing the city's reliance on coal-generated power, but this is the first step toward putting the rollback on an official timeline.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 25, 2013
With the groundbreaking of Glendale Unified's new aquatic center still a year away, school officials have hired a firm to explore adding renewable energy sources to the pool's design to save on future operating costs. The outdoor pool will be built at Glendale High School, but will serve the entire district. The $9.4 million project is still in the design phase. School officials have estimated the pool will cost Glendale Unified $200,000 to $300,000 per year to heat, maintain pumps and purchase chemicals.
NEWS
By Brittany Levine, brittany.levine@latimes.com | December 9, 2012
Once ahead of the game, Glendale has turned its focus from future gains in renewable energy to meeting more short-term state deadlines that it may, in the end, just eke through. All California public utilities must get 20% of their energy from renewable sources by 2013, and then 33% by 2020. As of 2011, Glendale Water & Power was well on its way to meeting the benchmarks, logging a 24% renewable rate at one point. In fact, it was doing so well that it decided to sell some of its renewable energy credits to Pasadena for $5.5 million.
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